Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00083
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: January 1937
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00083
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN

Published monthly from October to June by the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University
of New Hampshire ./ r '
Entered as second-class matter Octboer 10, 1927, at the post office at, New Hampshire under the
act of August 24, 1912.
Vol. 12 JANUARY, 1937 I No. 4


AT THE CALL OF THE BIRDS
AUDUBON, by Constance Rourke.
The ancestry of John James Audubon is still veiled in mists of conjecture,
but this excellent biography dispels any false ideas still prevalent about the char-
acter of the man. "He was not a dreamer in any true sense at all, admirable though
dreamers may be." He failed in business, but other, men have failed in business
who were not driven as he was by an undeniable urge to capture the color and
characteristic attitudes of his feathered friends and to record them faithfully in
water colors. Luck Bakewell was an ideal wife for Audubon and kept the family
together by her teaching when the family purse was empty. The twelve colored
plates from original Audubon prints make this a book to be treasured.


INTO INCENSE LAND
THE SOUTHERN GATES OF ARABIA, by Freya Stark.
Travel in Arabia is difficult at best, but when it is undertaken by a woman,
alone but for her native attendants, it is something to marvel at. Miss Stark has
written her second book of Oriental adventures, the first having dealt with Per-
sia. The Hadhramaut in southern Arabia is the land of the incense tree, source
of great riches in ancient days. It is mostly desert, with wadis or water courses
sometimes a thousand feet deep, and towns which in the illustrations resemble
more closely a conglomeration of New York apartment houses than one's idea
of desert villages. Miss Stark's objective was Shabwa, city of sixty temples and
center of the incense trade, still unvisited by Western man. Unfortunately when
only three days distant she was so incapacitated by illness that she had to be taken
out by airplane. But after reading of the experiences which she so bravely met
we should not be surprised if she were to try again.


"THE LONG LOOK BACK"
HANDWROUGHT ANCESTORS, by Marion Nicholl Rawson.
This brings the number of Miss Rawson's books on antiques to the magic
seven. If you collect or admire antiques, if you have ever strutted in a pair of
copper-toed shoes, or worked the bellows for a friendly blacksmith, you will not
want to skip a word of this book. The author is concerned, "not so much with
what the workman made in his shop, as what the shop made of the workman."
Articles for daily use had to be made by hand in the early days. Often they
were crude, sometimes beautiful, but the act of creation added something to
the characters of our ancestors which is lacking in this world of "ready-mades".
The book is generously illustrated with pictures of old shops, signs, tools and
0 nished articles and New Hampshire is well represented.

L,. .d% Of








OF GREAT MUSIC
OF LENA GEYER, by Marcia Davenport.
As the daughter of Alma Gluck, Marcia Davenport has had an enviable edu-
cation in music, and an acquaintance with many of the great contemporary musi-
cians. She has drawn upon this background for a novel of great beauty and
strength, dealing with an opera singer who is probably, in part at least, a com-
posite of several actual figures. By introducing many real people the author
heightens the illusion that this is biography rather than fiction, and so alive are
the imaginary characters that the reader accepts them as fact. We can hear
great singers today, but none can quite console us for having missed Geyer!


WAR AND WITCHCRAFT IN AFRICA
THE AFRICAN WITCH, by Joyce Cary.
Rimi is a small district on the Niger, ruled over by an Emir who is in his
dotage. There are several claimants to his throne, the chief one being Louis
Aladai, Oxford-educated prince. Louis feels the responsibility of leading his
people and cherishes the futile hope of bringing civilization to them through edu-
cation. His illiterate sister, Elizabeth, a powerful ju-ju priestess, wants his suc-
cession because she wrongly thinks he will protect her ju-ju. The few British
people stationed in Rimi are satirically portrayed as being chiefly interested in polo
and petty gossip around the club, and as being completely lacking in understand-
ing and sympathy for the natives. Civil war breaks out and both sides turn
against the English. Elizabeth has organized an army of young native women
because she knows the English will not shoot women. Mr. Cary shows both
knowledge and understanding of the black man's burden.

A SEARCH FOR EXCITEMENT
KIT BRANDON, by Sherwood Anderson.
Kit Brandon, self-educated, intelligent, tells her life's story as she drives ex-
pertly at the wheel of a car. Kit was a Virginia mountain girl who was driven
from home while still a young girl. She found work in a valley mill town where
she mingled freely with the workers. She here tells something of their lives,
their hardships and their ambitions. She met and married the son of the local
bootlegging king, and became a member of his gang. Due to her daring she.soon
became almost a legend. Eventually the gang was broken up and Kit, who had
tired of life, looked into the future only to find it very bleak. However, one
soon realizes that unlike Mr. Anderson's earlier perplexed characters, Kit's new
philosophy, which has evolved while she tells her story, offers her a solution which
may mean a happier life for her.

REMINISCENCES OF AN AMERICAN AUTHOR
THREE WORLDS, by Carl Van Doren.
This autobiography of one of America's leading literary figures is divided into
three parts. The first deals with his early life on an Illinois farm, then with
his student days in Urbana when the University of Illinois was still a young school,
and with his first years of teaching at Columbia. The second part is concerned
with the post-war years when he was a literary critic on the Nation. The last
part deals with the recent years of depression. As one would expect, Van Doren
gives intimate portraits of his literary colleagues, particularly his brother, Mark.
The first part of the book makes unusually good reading; the author led a normal
boy's life in a happy family and his childhood experiences are well-written.








A NATURALIST'S ALMANAC
THROUGH THE WOODS, by H. E. Bates.
Those who enjoyed Clare Leighton's Four Hedges, will welcome this com-
panion book which describes the English woodland through a complete cycle of the
seasons. "The small intimate English wood with its variation of trees, its many
flowers and bird-voices, its feeling of being only a part but never the whole of a
countryside." The delightful wood engravings are by Agnes Miller Parker.


CONFLICT IN GERMANY
THE WAR GOES ON, by Sholem Asch.
A novel of post-war Germany in which many threads of character and idea
are woven into a vivid picture. The main theme is the conflict between Jews
and Christians, an economic and religious conflict, with the Jews sometimes in
the position of defending Christianity against the Christians. There are unfor-
gettable scenes of life amid the uncertainties of inflation, with people starving or
eating the most appalling food. This is an excellent portrayal of the conditions
which led to the rise of Hitler.


G. K. C. TO THE FRONT
AS I WAS SAYING, by G. K. Chesterton.
Keen observation, punctuated with humorous fancies about thoughtless
thoughts and remarks of some moderns. Can the pacifist hold up armies with a
"glittering eye" as did the Ancient Mariner, or is there a difference between peace
and pacifism? And how is it possible for the "Bright Young Thing" to quarrel
with both father and grandfather? For if she disagrees with one she must agree
with the other! And the last essay, how appropriate, Royal Weddings.
THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF G. K. CHESTERTON.
Chesterton, in his inimitable style, has given us not only his autobiography but
pertinent bits about life in the good old Victorian Days and since, together with
glimpses of characters Dickensonian and otherwise. Altogether a delightful book.

THIS ENGLAND, by Mary Ellen Chase.
With wit and sincerity Miss Chase has compared the weather, the food, the
manners and the countryside of the United States and England. After a two year
visit to England she writes so that the charm of the life there triumphs over the
drainpipe situation and even the weather, with its almost daily report-"Further
outlook: Unsettled."
WILD GARDENS OF NEW ENGLAND, by Walter P. Eaton.
Spirited plea for the preservation of flowers in their natural setting, with
memoirs of a pleasant childhood in New England.
SEVENTY YEARS OF IT, by Edward A. Ross.
Frank autobiography of a well-known American pioneer sociologist and
author of many books.
ANN DOUGLAS SEDGWICK: A PORTRAIT IN LETTERS.
Self-portrait by means of 180 personal letters "of a charming and finely bred
woman whose novels enjoyed great popularity and earned deserved praise for their
excellent style."
THE SEVEN SOVEREIGN HILLS OF ROME, by Margaret Jackson and
Elizabeth Hodder.








RURAL NEW ENGLAND
PURITANS AT HOME, by Clarence M. Webster.
The author takes for his task that of giving a true picture of a typical Puritan
Town, Ridgeford, Connecticut. The name of the town is fictional but is back-
ground is entirely authentic, for the author is himself a "native" of the town
described. Be means of a series of short chapters on the various social aspects
of the town he successfully refutes many of the preconceived ideas relative to the
dyed-in-the-wool New England character. He emphatically states that "To know
a Puritan you must first realize that Puritanism took a tract of land a few miles
square, called it a town, and made a religion and a conscience of it." The rural
New England town has not changed materially in spirit and tone, as is often re-
iterated, despite constant efforts on the part of foreigners, artists, literati, etc.;
it resists all such efforts with true native resourcefulness and often teaches the
"reformer" a well-deserved lesson. This is a very interesting and entertaining
book and, we believe, no modern author had done a better piece of work in in-
terpreting his section of the country to the world.


SUGGESTIONS
I FOUND NO PEACE, by Webb Miller.
A very interesting autobiographical record of an American newspaper cor-
respondent who saw service in the most important world events during the past
twenty years.
THE ANATOMY OF FRUSTRATION, by H. G. Wells.
In a critique of the ideas and works of a hypothetical American author, Mr.
Wells gives us again his own thoughts on the state of the world in general.
THE NATIONALIZING OF BUSINESS, 1878-1898, by Ida M. Tarbell.
"It may fairly be said that no other book on the subject offers so clear a
picture of the sweep of American economic development-its freshness, its vitality,
its lack of moral scruple." Comprises a volume in A History of American Life
series.
ARE AMERICAN TEACHERS FREE? by Howard K. Beale.
This comprehensive survey leaves no doubt as to the answer to the question
contained in the title. The author concludes that "The really important question
is: Dare society face the consequences of not permitting the teachers of the next
generation complete freedom?"
THE FUTURE OF LIBERTY, by George Soule.
THE BROTHERS ASHKENAZI, by I. J. Singer.
BEYOND SING THE WOODS, by Trygve Gulbranssen.
MORE POEMS, by A. E. Houseman.
SAM ADAMS; PIONEER IN PROPAGANDA, by John C. Miller.
THE'LIFE OF GEORGE MOORE, by Joseph Hone.
GREEN MARGINS, by E. P. O'Donnell.
PREFACE TO PEASANTRY, by Arthur F. Raper.
FORAYS AND REBUTTALS, by Bernard DeVoto.
OLD WIRES AND NEW WAVES, by Alvin F. Harlow.
FUNNY PIECES, by Stephen Leacock.
THE HIGHER LEARNING IN AMERICA, by Robert M. Hutchins.
PARAGUAYAN INTERLUDE, by C. W. Thurlow Craig.




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