Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00082
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: December 1936
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00082
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LANTERN

Published monthly from October to June by the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter Octboer 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, fw Hampshire, under the
act of August 24, 1912.

Vol. 12 DECEMBER, 1936 No. 3 /'

TRAVELS OF AN ARTIST \"
HEADS AND TALES, by Malvina Hoffman., -
The autobiography of this well known sculptor is devoted largely to her world
tour in search of models for the Field Museum of Chicago. Desirous of portraying
the races of mankind before any should become extinct, the Museum commissioned
Miss Hoffman to make a series of models which, cast in bronze, inhabit its Hall of
Man. This was not merely a matter of sculpture, but of overcoming the religious
prejudices of primitive people, of working sometimes under very difficult conditions,
of combatting the technical problems of carrying her materials, of fighting illness
and the inconvenience of travelling far off the beaten paths. The results, judging
by the photographs in the book, are magnificent. Both art and ethnography have
been well served.

"AND BAY THE MOON"
MY TALKS WITH DEAN SPANLEY, by Lord Dunsany.
"The difficulty about transmigration," said the author at his club, "is that no-
body ever yet remembered having lived a former life." "H'm," said Dean Spanley,
a remark which prompted the author to invite him to dinner and to loose his tongue
with a rare old wine. After just the right number of glasses the Dean would talk
of chasing rabbits and foxes, of greeting a cart at the back door and learning the
news from the smells on its wheels. "I always distrusted the moon," said he. "It
had no smell, as a proper enemy should. I guarded the Masters against it, and
it never deared to come any nearer." Though it is quite possible that Dean Span-
ley was a dog in a former existence, we strongly suspect that it was Lord Dunsany
himself, who for obvious reasons does not wish to reveal how he came to know
so much about a dog's thoughts.

"DACHAIGH AN FROMHAIR"
AWAY TO CAPE BRETON, by Mrs. Gordon Brinley.
The Duchess, of course, suggested it, but like Barkus, Dan was willing and,.
aided by the faithful Sally, these amiable, breezy travellers set out to see Cape
Breton Island. Their route lay through Northern New England, New Brunswick
and Nova Scotia. Finally, the Sir Charles Tupper bore them safely across the
Strait of Canso and deposited them at Port Hawkesbury. When they reached
Baddeck with Beinn Bhreagh in the background, it was a case of love at first sight,
and they understood why Alexander Graham Bell loved his Island home. The
Cabot Trail made up for its lack of elevation by its breathtaking curves and its
vistas of unexpected beauty. There was much fishing, sketching (we'd like a
sketch of Dan and his audience at Neil Harbour) a real "milling frolic," visits to
the home of Giant McAskill, to the Fortress of Louisburg, and many new friend-
ships. As in Away to the Gaspe, the book includes practical notes for the traveller.
Where will Sally take them for their next adventure?


P. 1X. A3. (33,







JEHANNE, HERSELF
JOAN OR ARC; SELF PORTRAIT, comp. and tr. by Willard Trask.
Trask has no new material on Jeanne d'Arc but he has arranged the old to
good effect. From the records of her trials he has gathered Jeanne's own simple
statements and arranged them to give a fairly complete narrative of her life. The
result is a story of great simplicity, sincerity and faith. It is short and naive; one
can not help but wonder how the hard men of her time could have taken her seri-
ously and have treated her so severely.


THE HERMITS OF EGYPT
THE DESERT FATHERS, translated by Helen Waddell.
To go to the Latin sources (the Vitae Patrum) of the lives of the early Christian
monks, to translate these into English, making of them gems of narrative writing,
yet preserving the spirit and thought of the early Christian centuries is no easy
task, but one which Miss Waddell has admirably accomplished. It was from this
same source that Anatole France took his Thais. Romance, love, piety, austerity,
are rendered with poetic beauty in these devout tales.


ON THE RANDD"
GOLD FEVER, by L. M. Nesbitt.
Gold Fever, together with The Hell-Hole of Creation and Desolate Marches,
gives us a kind of autobiography of Nesbitt, that brilliant young engineer who
courageously and successfully faced some of the world's most dangerous and diffi-
cult jobs and who was killed in an airplane crash in 1935. Gold Fever is about
subterranean Johannesburg; that place of wealth, turmoil, noise, toil, speed, danger
and death. Nesbitt saw Johannesburg clearly, felt it keenly, was not ashamed of
his feelings and has described all dispassionately. It is a grim book; "it is the vivid,
sympathetic memory of youth recorded with the more complete judgment of ma-
turity."

WHEN THE SOUTHWEST WAS YOUNG
EARLY AMERICANA AND OTHER STORIES, by Conrad Richter.
Nine short stories of pioneer days in the Southwest. The author understands
his medium and is adept in creating the desired atmosphere with few words. We
will not blame you if now and then you take a furtive peep over your shoulder as
you read to reassure yourself that no Indians are lurking in the vicinity. The char-
acters are very convincing, especially Frank Gant and his obstinate refusal to admit
the loss of his power with the inevitable coming of the railroad, and Sabina Clark's
courage during the Indian raid.


CIVIL SERVANT OF ITALY
MACHIAVELLI AND HIS TIMES, by D. Erskine Muir.
Many people who are familiar with The Prince, know very little about its
author. Dr. Muir presents Niccolo Machiavelli in a clear light, ably interpreting
the part he played in that stormy period of his country's career. Savonarola, the
Medici and the maligned Borgia family were also leading figures of that era. The
latter part of the book deals with Machiavelli's political theories set forth in The
Prince and other writings.







CHARLES DANA GIBSON
PORTRAIT OF AN ERA, by Fairfax Downey.
Charles Dana Gibson began his artistic career when a very young boy, by
cutting out silhouettes of animals. Early in his youth he turned to pen and ink.
His first drawing was accepted by Life and from then on, the stories of the artist
and the magazine are closely allied. The best remembered of his subjects is the
Gibson Girl-no one particular person, but a model herself for American woman-
hood. Through the Gibson Girl, this artist told feminine following what to wear,
how to act and the type of man to love. Gibson, a clever satirist and cartoonist,
was not politically-minded. However, at the advent of the World War, he took
over the chairmanship of the Division of Pictorial Publicity and did a fine piece
of work. Throughout the entire text are reproductions of Gibson's pictures and
as one glances through these pages, the meaning of the title becomes clear.

THE BEAUTIES OF GREENLAND
WITH 'PLANE, BOAT AND CAMERA IN GREENLAND, by Ernest Sorge.
In the summer of 1932, a German expedition, financed by Carl Laemmle, set
out for Greenland. They intended to make two motion pictures, and to carry on
a scientific investigation of icebergs and the oceanography of various fiords. The
author was expert adviser to Dr. Fanck, leader of the expedition, and carried on
scientific study. He explains the particular difficulties in taking motion pictures
on, and of, treacherous, undependable icebergs. His own experience on the Rink
Glacier when his boat was smashed by a calving of the glacier is exciting. There
are two hundred pictures, marvels of photography, done in blue and white. The
pictures of the inhabitants, the members of the expedition, and the surroundings
were taken both from the ground and the air.

WHERE IS LAUGHTER?
IN PURSUIT OF LAUGHTER, by Agnes Repplier.
A volume of nine essays which trace the history of the pursuit of laughter from
the Middle Ages to the present day. The thirteenth century was alive with hearty
laughter which the Church attempted to suppress. Through the fourteenth and
fifteenth centuries, laughter steadily declined. In Elizabethan times, an unsuccess-
ful attempt was made to revive it. Here are some of the persons mentioned in the
essays: Bunyan, who, of all people, was possessed of a keen wit; Hogarth, por-
trayed as a social reformer of no little talent; Sidney Smith, who lost a bishopric
because of unseemly laughter; Lord and Lady Holland, host and hostess in the
"House of Laughter". Some Americans are mentioned: Artemus Ward, Mark
Twain, Bill Nye and Will Rogers. In conclusion, Miss Repplier quotes to the
effect that yesterday's laughter is gone and never will return, probably because its
pursuit is ill-organized.

PRESENT, PAST AND FUTURE
BURNING CITY, by Stephen Vincent Benet.
"This is for you who are to come, with Time,
And gaze upon our ruins with strange eyes."
New York is the "Burning City" being consumed with the slow-burning flame
of Time and destroying everything in its great conflagration. A number of these
poems are new, but many have appeared in magazines. They are not all concerned
with New York. We might say the general theme is present conditions linked with
the past and our future. Regardless of the fact that critics do not agree about
the caliber of the poems, we feel that Notes To Be Left in a Cornerstone, Ode To
Walt Whitman, Sparrow, and Nightmare Number Three, will at least have a wide
appeal.







FROM CUCHULAIN TO DE VALERA
DEAR DARK HEAD, by Helen Landreth.
This is a history, not so much of outward events as of the spirit of the Irish
people. The beginning of Irish history is lost in legend, and the old legends are
retold by an author who has steeped herself in the rich poetic lore and who writes
with all the fervor of the ancient bards. Coming to historic times, Miss Landreth
tells of the Renaissance, which came to Ireland seven hundred years before it blos-
somd in Italy, only to be crushed by Viking raids and later by English oppression.
This oppression overshadows the story down to the rise of Sinn Fein. Both the
legendary and historic parts of the books contain a vast amount of material ably
presented, based on wide research and documented to the smallest detail.


SUGGESTIONS
BIRD ALONE, by Sean O'Faolain.
A new novel by one of the most important of contemporary Irish writers. It
is a prose poem with something of an epic quality, filled with the fervor and wild
imaginings and intense living of the Irish people.
RICH LAND, POOR LAND, by Stuart Chase.
A timely and powerful indictment of the course America has persued in the
merciless depletion of its natural resources, with practical suggestions as to what
can be done towards remedying a situation which, in many instances, is becoming
serious even to the present generation. Fascinating reading despite the discourag-
ing picture it paints.
THE AMERICAN IDEAL, by Arthur Bryant.
THE DECLINE AND RISE OF THE CONSUMER, by Horace M. Kallen.
AMERICAN DEMOCRACY AND THE WORLD WAR; PRE-WAR
YEARS, 1913-1917, by Frederic L. Paxson.
MAINLAND, by Gilbert Seldes.
INTIMATE THINGS, by Karel Capek.
DEMOCRACY ENTERS THE COLLEGE, by R. L. Duffus.
ROAD TO EXILE, by Emilio Lussu.
GOMEZ, TYRANT OF THE ANDES, by Thomas Rourke.
SELF AND PARTNERS, by C. J. Holmes.
THE COWBOY, by Philip A. Rollins.


FICTION, POPULAR AND SERIOUS
JOHN DAWN, by Robert P. Tristram Coffin.
THE MAN FROM NORLANDS, by John Buchan.
WHITE BANNERS, by Lloyd Douglas.
THREE BAGS FULL, by Roger Burlingame.
THE OLD ASHBURTON PLACE, by Margaret Flint.
WINDS OVER THE CAMPUS, by James W. Linn.
THE KIDNAP MURDER CASE, by S. S. Van Dine pseudd.)
CO-OP, by Upton Sinclair.
CANDLE INDOORS, by Helen Hull.
HARVARD HAS A HOMICIDE, by Timothy Fuller.
DEATH OF A MAN, by Kay Boyle.
HONOR BRIGHT, by Frances P. Keyes.
MOSCOW SKIES, by Maurice Hindus.
A PRAYER FOR MY SON, by Hugh Walpole.




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