Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00081
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1936
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00081
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LANTERN

Published monthly from October to June by the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter Octboer 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire, under the
act of August 24, 1912.

Vol. 12 NOVEMBER, 1936 .No. 2

CHILDREN'S BOOK NUMBER /
(See pages 2 and 3)

AFTER TWENTY-FIVE YEA4 S !
WAS COLLEGE WORTH WHILE? by John R. Tunis.' \ " -
The question can be argued indefinitely, but this book iF c -ned only w /,
facts, ascertained by a questionnaire sent to members of the var ass fi9
by one of their number. What is the average salary of a men of tlh' clahs-.4
Did college fit him for life? How many married college women? ~i atd
think of careers for their wives? The happiest members of the class are those who
live in small towns and rural areas, and those who are farmers, physicians, scien-
tists, and teachers. A brief study of the Yale and Princeton classes of 1911 is
included for comparison. The book will settle no questions, but it suggests to the
present generation what their college career may and may not do for them.

REVOLUTIONARY NEW YORK
DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK, by Walter D. Edmonds.
An authoritative historical novel dealing with the American Revolution, cover-
ing the eight years from 1776-1784 when the Mohawk Valley was a raiding para-
dise for Tories and Indians. Settlers, hard-working frontiersmen and their families,
constantly had to scurry into blockhouses and forts to avoid certain death, leaving
their homes to be pillaged or burned. Gilbert Martin and his wife, Magdelana,
are the chief characters, and it is their story which is told against a background of
revolution and political disturbance. The struggling young couple are busily en-
gaged in clearing land for their home when torn apart by the war; however, they
are brought closer to each other by reason of ensuing hardships endured together.

THE GOLDEN YEARS
THE FLOWERING OF NEW ENGLAND, by Van Wyck Brooks.
This literary history of New England is written so vividly that it conveys a
sense of contemporaneity. We see George Ticknor and Edward Everett sailing
for Europe, and returning to plant the seeds of literary consciousness in the fertile
soil of Cambridge and Boston. This was the beginning of the movement that pro-
duced Longfellow, Hawthorne, Lowell, Thoreau, and had its supreme flowering
in Emerson. A most readable, even exciting narrative, yet one which is docu-
mented to the smallest detail.

FROM THE NORWEGIAN
GUNNAR'S DAUGHTER, by Sigrid Undset.
A tale of medieval Norway told in Sigrid Undset's incomparable style. The
violence of primitive emotions is the motivation of a story as fateful as that of
~ ri ristan and Iseult.

0%. N vau
-t n. i Ai, tu w19t







CHILDREN'S BOOKS
The following books, and possibly other new titles not yet received, will be on display in the Library
during Children's Book Week, November 15-21. Postals may be had at the main desk for reserving any of
these books.

PICTURE STORY BOOKS
GEORGE WASHINGTON, by Ingri and Edgar D'Aulaire.
The story of George Washington's life simply told and beautifully illustrated.
SAMBO AND THE TWINS, by Helen Bannerman.
Little Black Sambo rescues the twins from the wicked monkeys.
HANSI, by Ludwig Bemelmans.
Hansi's Christmas vacation with his aunt and uncle in the Austrian Tyrol.
TAMMIE AND THAT PUPPY, by Dorothy and Marguerite Bryan.
When the children get a puppy Tammie is so jealous he runs away.
NO-SITCH: THE HOUND, by Phil Stong.
No-Sitch isn't nearly as sad as he looks and has a good time with the boys.
THE SONGS WE SING, by Hendrik van Loon.
Nursery rhymes set to music, with Mr. van Loon's amusing comments.
BLUEBONNETS FOR LUCINDA, by Frances Clarke Sayers.
Lucinda and Barnacle learn something about geese when they visit Herr and
Frau Geranium in bluebonnet time. Barnacle? Oh! he's Lucinda's cat.
MITTENS, by Clare Turlay Newberry.
Mittens is an irresistible kitty and we don't blame Richard for wanting him.
BEPPO, by Emma Brock.
LITTLE JEEMES HENRY, by Ellis Credle.
COWBOY TOMMY, by Sanford Tousey.
THE MERRY MOUSE, Helen and Alf Evers.
LITTLE ONES, by Dorothy Kunhardt.
SNIPP, SNAPP, SNURR AND THE YELLOW SLED, by Maj Lindman.

BOOKS FOR THE IN-BETWEENS
THREE GOLDEN ORANGES, by Ralph Bowman and Mary Gould Davis.
Ten Spanish folk tales collected and translated by these two authors.
FIERCE FACE, by Dhan Gopal Mukerji.
The biography of a young tiger. Beautiful illustrations by Dorothy Lathrop.
THE MAGIC PUDDING, by Norman Lindsay.
A nonsense book full of chuckles about Bunyip Bluegum and his companions.
LIS SAILS THE ATLANTIC, by Lis Andersen.
An account of the trip Lis took with her family in a small ketch from Copen-
hagen to America and home again. Based on the diary Lis kept.
FLOWERS AND THEIR TRAVELS, by Frances Margaret Fox.
Where flowers came from and how they get from one country to another.
Many flower legends are also included.
TALES FROM A FINNISH TUPA, by James C. Bowman and Margery Bianco.
Some of the folk tales Finnish children love. Amusing illustrations by Laura
Bannon.
AFKE'S TEN, by Ninke van Hichtum.
Mother Afke has a lively time trying to keep track of her ten children.
UMI: THE HAWAIIAN BOY WHO BECAME A KING, by Robert Lee
Eskridge.
How Umi discovered his royal heritage.
SAJO AND THE BEAVER PEOPLE, by Grey Owl.
The story of two beaver kittens who were rescued when the family was de-
stroyed by an otter. Drawings by Grey Owl who knows and likes these clever
animals.
LIONS, by W. W. Robinson.
A companion book to "Elephants."







(Children's books continued)
VICTORIA JOSEPHINE, by Margaret Baker.
Few dolls over seventy have the pep that Victoria Josephine has and she finds
life anything but dull after Diana's birthday. Charming silhouettes by Mary Baker.
KING, by Thomas C. Hinkle.
A collie pup who is stolen twice from his home ranch becomes a fine sheep dog.
GHOSTS AND GOBLINS, by Wilhelmina Harper.
This is just the book for Hallowe'en.
HARD ALEE!, by Nora Benjamin.
The adventures of the Careys on the New England coast in the family ketch.
SINGING SANDS, by Grace Moon.
Piki has to leave the Government School and solves a mystery at home.

BOOKS FOR OLDER BOYS AND GIRLS
MARIAN-MARTHA, by Lucile F. Fargo.
Two girls like their work in the school library so well that they go to college
and library school. They even get Jack interested in library work.
THE SECRET OF THE CHESTNUT TREE, by Helen Albee Monsell.
Boarding school life in Virginia before the Civil War and a mystery to solve.
BEYOND THE GREAT WALL, by Edward Dragonet.
Modern Manchuria, and a young boy obliged to outwit dangerous bandits.
TINKER OF STONE BLUFF, by Nason H. Arnold.
A school story centering around four roommates at a Vermont school.
DAVID AND JOHNATHAN, by Donal H. Haines.
Another story for boys with much football and baseball and a fine friendship.
COCKATOO, by Gladys Hasty Carroll.
An early book by the author of "As the Earth Turns."
BETSY'S NAPOLEON, by Jeanette Eaton.
Betsy's father was stationed at St. Helena in 1815 and she became friendly
with the exiled Emperor.
COME SUMMER, by Virginia McCarty Bare.
Five orphaned children come to Franklin, N. H., to the farm their father left
them.
SWORD OF THE WILDERNESS, by Elizabeth Coatsworth.
Seth Hubbard is captured by Indians in the raid on the village of Pemaquoit
in 1689 and is kept prisoner for nearly a year until an exchange of prisoners is
made.


A NEW NOVEL IN COUNTERPOINT
EYELESS IN GAZA, by Aldous Huxley.
This is an exercise in mental gymnastics, since each succeeding chapter leaps
backward or forward in time from a few months to thirty years. The chronology
is therefore somewhat difficult to resolve, but the method is interesting in the hands
of an expert like Huxley. And whereas past events may be referred to before they
have been narrated, suspense is maintained by the fact that the events are not fully
explained, nor the characters completely synthesized, until the end of the book.
There is little plot. The characters are mostly English and of the same type that
Huxley wrote about in Point Counter Point. The protagonist believes himself a
free man, but at the age of forty-three discovers that freedom from responsibilities
is a sham, and that real freedom consists in identifying himself with other human
beings.








A COOL RECEPTION
OSCAR WILDE DISCO VERS AMERICA, by Lloyd Lewis and Henry J. Smith.
Back in 1882, Richard D'Oyly Carte, who produced Gilbert and Sullivan plays,
had the showman's instinct to sponsor a series of lectures by Oscar Wilde here in
America. Patience was about to be produced here, the play which was definitely
a burlesque on Oscar Wilde and his ideas. However, in spite of this, Wilde agreed
to come to America to talk about his conceptions of beauty and the better life. The
Apostle of the Lily was well-received in some cities, particularly in the western
states, but the country on the whole was not very kind to him. This book is a
compilation of newspaper ads, articles, cartoons, and all the better known, as well
as the lesser-known, Wilde quips concerning America and Americans.

THE BEGINNING OF LIFE
SEEDS, THEIR PLACE IN LIFE AND LEGEND, by Vernon Quinn.
Although many books of general interest have been written about flowers,
plants and trees, no one heretofore has been very much interested in writing about
seeds, at least from a non-technical point of view. This little book tells in a fas-
cinating way about seeds, their habits, uses and the superstitions and legends con-
nected with them. Many kinds are described by the author: floating seeds, cling-
ing seeds, tumbling seeds, shooting seeds, etc. Their common uses are, primarily,
for food and drink, for medicinal purposes, and in the manufacture of clothing
and other items. A few strange uses for seeds: wine, dyes, jewelry and decora-
tive ornaments, and in early Colonial days, beans were used as a medium of
exchange!

COMMANDING H. M. S. BOUNTY
LIFE OF VICE-ADMIRAL WILLIAM BLIGH, by George Mackaness.
The beginning and end of William Bligh was not the famous incident of the
Mutiny on the Bounty. He first appeared on ships papers at the tender age of
seven; the Bounty was his first command at the age of thirty-three. He saw long
and active service, bearing the title of Vice-Admiral at the time of his death. As
a complete life of Bligh, this biography is of general interest and, as a lasting
contribution to history, it will he of particular interest to nautically minded readers.
It should prove to be the final definitive work on this much discussed gentleman,
for seldom have we seen a more thoroughly documented study.

NEW HAMPSHIRE IN ACTION
REVOLUTIONARY NEW HAMPSHIRE, by Richard Francis Upton.
Mr. Upton wrote this book while yet an undergraduate at Dartmouth College,
1934-35, as a result of having been awarded a Senior Fellowship. Interest in his
native state and in history led him into a desire to study the social and economic
aspects of the American Revolution in New Hampshire. The history makes no
claim to be an exhaustive study of sources, but it does contribute admirably to the
knowledge of the economic status of the state at a critical and romantic period.
The book is exceedingly interesting and well done.


THE PEOPLE, YES, by Carl Sandburg.
ALONG NEW ENGLAND SHORES, by A. Hyatt Verrill.
ENGLISH PRELUDE, by Marguerite Allis.
THE OLIVE FIELD, by Ralph Bates.
THREE CENTURIES OF HARVARD, by Samuel E. Morison.




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