Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00080
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: October 1936
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00080
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LAN TRN

Published monthly from October to u.n By the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the .Ui'itersitV, ,
of New Hampshire -. .
Entered as second-class matter Octboer 10, 1927, at the post office m, New Hampshire, und the
act of August 24, 1912.

Vol. 12 OCTOBER, 1936 "- T .: No. 1

BACKWOODS AMERICA
LISTEN FOR A LONESOME DRUM, by Carl Carmer.
To those of us who enjoyed Mr. Carmer's earlier book, Stars Fell on Alaba-
ma, this will prove a special treat; to those who are not acquainted with his writing
it should prove a pleasant discovery. The author is here writing of the social life
and customs of a section with which he is intimately acquainted, his native up-state
New York. The book, incidentally, adds proof to the claim that lower New York
-New York City and Westchester-is in no real sense a part of the state, the
major portion of which may be said to conform to our idea of the typical backwoods
American community. Mr. Carmer spent two years wandering through the sec-
tion gathering legends, folklore, tall stories, and some fact. He made a selection
for publication, from an enormous amount of material, of those which he con-
sidered as best representing the region. Thus we have fact and fancy relating to
such as Chatauqua, Indians, rattlesnake hunters, cock-fighting, Shakers, Millerites,
Joshua Simth and the golden plates of the Book of Mormon, and the unique
Oenida Community eugenical experiment.

THE MODERNS WELL PRESENTED
THE SIGNIFICANT MODERNS, by C. J. Bulliet.
Some sixty-eight painters are here discussed with a clarity which is often lack-
ing in books on modern art. In a few pages the author gives the significant bio-
graphical facts of each and a brief analysis of his aims and achievements. Nu-
merous full-page plates supplement the text and give in many cases a new idea of
the range of the painter's technique. Finally there are fifteen plates at the end
representing the historical development of painting, designed to show that all the
"isms" of the present have their roots in the past.

CIVIL WAR EPIC
GONE WITH THE WIND, by Margaret Mitchell.
This first novel is the story of Scarlett O'Hara, showing the effect of the
Civil War upon her life and character. Brought up to young womanhood on a
wealthy plantation, Scarlett, the most beautiful girl in the county, had expected all
the ease and plenty of life. During the war, she lost everything excepting the
family home and was often hungry. It was then that she decided never to be
hungry again or to be without the luxuries of life at no matter what cost. She lied
whenever necessary, ran a lumber business, a thoroughly shocking occupation for
a gentlewoman of the times, and married a man she did not love. The men in her
life were a young boy she married at the outbreak of the war to spite Ashley
Wilkes, whom she had loved since childhood; Rhett Butler, scoundrel and block-
ade runner who was attracted to Scarlett because she also was a social rebel.
A long book but one of constant interest and permanent value.


PERIODICAL


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,V4'fVieCrL







"THE MOTHER OF THE REVOLUTION"
SANFELICE, by Vincent Sheean.
The French Revolution inspired a wave of revolutionary activity in many
parts of Europe; and in the Kingdom of Naples, where an ignorant, loathsome
king ruled with his domineering consort, the time was particularly ripe for in-
trigue. Vincent Sheean has taken this historical material for the background of
a novel rich and colorful, in which Luisa Sanfelice, discarded wife of a dissolute
nobleman, rises from poverty to fame. Through the love of three men she be-
comes involved against her will in the plots and counterplots that seethe in the
city, while love is all she comprehends. To save one man she unwittingly sacri-
fices another, and the resulting coup sweeps her to fame as "The mother of the
Revolution," a revolution she neither understands nor desires. Her tragedy is
that of all those who are victims of forces beyond their comprehension.
Though the author professes indifference as to the pronunciation of the name,
the following may be of interest: the Sanfelice family originated in Spain, where
it would be called "Sanfeleethay," but was domiciled in Italy, where it would
become "Sanfeleechay," in each case with the accent on the third syllable. Take
your choice.

THE THINKING REED, by Rebecca West.
This novel of pre-depression France gives a picture of high society somewhat
similar to that of pre-war Europe shown by Briffault in Europa. Miss West's
people, however, are less depraved, if more stupid. Against such a background
Isabelle, a young, wealthy, and widowed American girl, undertakes to adjust her-
self to Paris, and to marriage to a rather unpromising Frenchman. She succeeds,
though "man is but a reed, the most feeble thing in nature; but he is a thinking
reed." If Isabelle is the only character in the book who thinks, the others are
at least entertaining. Though this is perhaps not the best of Miss West's work,
it is brilliant at times, and well worth reading.


TWO WIDELY DIFFERENT ARTS
FILM AND THEATRE, by Allardyce Nicoll.
The new head of the department of drama at Yale writes an illuminating book
comparing the scope of the moving picture with that of the theatre. While not
believing that the former will necessarily supplant the latter, he does hold that
the theatre is doomed if it continues its trend toward naturalism. Aeschylus and
Shakespeare did not try to copy life, but conventionalized it, and their works are
thus independent of time and place. This cannot be said of many modern plays,
which, while significant, are soon dated. Naturalism is much better left to the
moving picture, which has a vast array of techniques unavailable to the stage.
An awareness of these techniques as gained through this book will greatly in-
crease one's appreciation of a good picture.

UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREES
GREEN LAURELS, by Donald Culross Peattie.
Have you ever wondered how plants acquired their genera and species names?
And who first "thought up" the botanic system? When did the witches' and
herbalists' knowledge of plants become the science of botany? Botany has evolved
from the minds of men. This story of the growth of an idea and of the mighty
men of nature, the naturalists, is the story Donald Culross Peattie has told so
personally and ably. Eight pages of bibliography.







EIGHT YEAR ODYSSEY
MY GREAT WIDE BEAUTIFUL WORLD, by Juanita Harrison.
With more determination than money, this remarkable colored woman set
out at the age of thirty-six to realize her childhood dreams of seeing the world.
She likes people and places and was invariably captivated by each new country
she visited. When her funds ran low she took a job until she had enough money
saved to start out again. She made a point of being well-informed about the
most interesting features of each new country before she reached it and could
put many a tourist to shame with her stock of information. She speaks French,
German and Spanish, as well as English, but spelling and grammar are not her
long suits. Her comments are keen and often highly amusing. Describing a
church in Malines, Belgium, she writes, "The big old Notre Dame Church have a
famous painting by Rubens. 'Maraculous Droaught of Fishes.' The head of the
Angel are said to be that of his second wife if so she was a real knockout."
Of Jaipur, India, she writes, "The wide streets look like a carnival many differ-
ent carts drawn by white Bullocks Camels and Elefants with two bells that swing
and tinkle as it step." The book is a joy from start to finish-bullfights, "fun-
nels," markets and all.

TEN YEARS LATER
THE WEATHER IN THE STREETS, by Rosamond Lehman.
Many of the characters in "Invitation to the Waltz" appear in this new novel
by the talented English authoress. Olivia Curtis is the central figure. Ten years
have elapsed since the night of the Spencers' party. Olivia has married and
separated from Ivor Craig. Called home by her father's illness, she meets Rollo
Spencer on the train. Rollo has married the lovely Nicola, but is not very happy.
Miss Lehman's skill saves the ensuing "affair" from melodrama, bringing out the
undercurrents which eddy and swirl about the Olivias who seek love on such a
level. The story is complete in itself, but the somewhat abrupt ending leads us
to wonder if Miss Lehman will pick up the threads at some future date.

A NOVEL OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
THE MOUNTAIN AND THE PLAIN, by Herbert Gorman.
Mr. Gorman writes another gripping novel of the French Revolution.
Through the cataclysmic scenes moves David Livingston, a young American in
Paris, who falls for a time under the spell of Thomas Paine. At first he merely
watches the maelstrom, but his friendship with Alain Gihon draws him into its
toils and he works enthusiastically for Sans Chagrin. Unaware of the identity of
Sans Chagrin, Alain's brother Yves seeks to destroy him, and kills the last spark
of affection which Alain holds for him. The friendship of David and Alain is
nearly wrecked by their love for the same girl, but Alain saves the situation.
Thomas Paine and his idealistic philosophy play a large part in the story.

"MY WAY"
AFTER ALL, by Clarence Day.
"It's hard, though," Clarence Day said, when he was working on this collec-
tion of essays, "to find a title, because after all, it's just my way of looking at
these problems and people." We wish we might have answered: "That is what
we enjoyed in the New Yorker, Harper's, the New Republic, your way of look-
ing, and describing, your humorous twists, and your queer little sketches, all
of them so very much your own, after all."







SEARCHING FOR BIRDS
BIRDS IN THE WILDERNESS, by George M. Sutton.
Very well illustrated by the author, who is curator of birds at Cornell Uni-
versity, these episodes of a life-long hunt for the elusive and rare species of birds
are most refreshing. Dr. Sutton began his study of birds when he was a small
boy, by collecting, housing, studying the habits and drawing from actual speci-
mens. This book is a series of his adventures from boyhood up to the present.
Particularly thrilling are an adventure with a turkey vulture, a chapter on ex-
ploring for the rare blue goose's egg, and the discovery of the egg of the Harris
sparrow. The book cannot fail to interest present bird-lovers and to add many of
its readers to their ranks.

HEALTH FOR THE WORLD AT LARGE
AN AMERICAN DOCTOR'S ODYSSEY, by Victor Heiser.
Dr. Heiser begins his biography by a vivid description of the Johnstown flood,
when at the age of sixteen, he lost his home, parents, and was left to his own
resources. He studied hard to get his degrees and then passed a very difficult
examination for Marine Hospital Service. Dr. Heiser was primarily interested
in the prevention of disease and all his life he battled such diseases as plague,
cholera, beriberi, and smallpox. In the Philippines, he instituted health meas-
ures against the spread of these diseases reducing the death rate over fifty thousand
lives a year. He travelled the world over, under the best and the worst of con-
ditions to bring better health to people. The actual medical narrative is inter-
spersed with humorous anecdotes, characterizations of men and countries, ob-
servations of things outside his own immediate field.

DEATH STRUGGLE OF THE FEDERALISTS
JEFFERSON IN POWER, by Claude G. Bowers.
Eight years in which the management of federal finances was brilliantly suc-
cessful; eight years with complete absence of scandal in administration; these were
Jefferson's years of administration; no wonder Mr. Bowers feels it was a great
apd stirring time. And the men in public life: Jefferson and Hamilton, Mar-
*ll and Burr, Madison and Monroe. "To disclose the leaders, . to picture
the actors off the stage, . to make them men and not mere steel engravings
. .such is the purpose of this story of Plutarchian days." With much of the
material gathered from newspapers of the period the book is, of course, full of
timely bits.

SUGGESTIONS
DEATH IS A LITTLE MAN, by Minnie H. Moody.
THE CAMPUS AND SOCIAL IDEALS, by Harold S. Tuttle.
WHOSE CONSTITUTION, by Henry A. Wallace.
ESSAYS IN APPRECIATION, by John L. Lowes.
GENERAL SMUTS, by Sarah G. Million.
SALAR THE SALMON, by Henry Williamson.
THE 1936 BOOK OF SMALL HOUSES.
THE A. M. C. WHITE MOUNTAIN GUIDE (10th ed.)
SECURITY AGAINST SICKNESS, by Isidore S. Falk.
ADULT EDUCATION, by Lyman Bryson.
OUR AMERICAN MAPLES AND SOME OTHERS, by Margaret C. Finlay.
MORE NEW HAMPSHIRE FOLK TALES.
HUMOR OF THE OLD DEEP SOUTH, by Arthur P. Hudson.
LIFE INSURANCE: A LEGALIZED RACKET, by M. and E. A. Gilbert.




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