Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00079
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: June 1936
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00079
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LAN.

Published monthly from October to June by the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University', i \
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post offl rham New
Hampshire, under the act of August 24, 1912.
VOL. 11 JUNE, 1936 '

CIVILIZATION IN THE FAR NORTH
FINLAND, THE NEW NATION, by Agnes Rothery.
Two months ago we reviewed a book on Sweden. Finland, while industrially
less diversified, is quite as progressive as its neighbor. Here also consumer coopera-
tion is highly developed, and a great amount of foresight is expended on the con-
servation and development of natural resources. Illiteracy is less than one per cent,
remarkable for a country where much of the population is scattered on remote farms
and islands. Contemporary Finns include the greatest living composer and perhaps
the greatest living architect. All these attractions of a country also endowed with
great natural beauty provide material for a most interesting book.

HERE'S TO SUCCESS!
WAKE UP AND LIVE, by Dorothea Brande.
If you are not the success you should be, Mrs. Brande advances the theory that
it is all due to your Will To Fail. She points out the working of this insidious
force, and its dire effect, and offers "twelve disciplines" to put it to rout. So, if your
most talkative friend lapses into hour silences, or that friend who always talks about
himself, talks about others for a change, do not be unduly surprised: he may be try-
ing to Wake Up and Live.

ALONG THE CONNECTICUT VALLEY
THE HEART OF OLD NEW ENGLAND, by A. Hyatt Verrill.
Following the course of the Connecticut River, Mr. Verrill recalls the early his-
tory of the cities and towns through which it flows. Early settlers, Indians, witches
and pirates, troop through these pages; nor is the author adverse to emphasizing
the barbarous treatment which the Indians received from the Whites, a matter
usually glossed over by most writers. A guide book as well as a history.

HOSPITALS IN THE WAR
FROM A SURGEON'S JOURNAL, by Harvey Cushing.
Much of Dr. Cushing's deftness with a scalpel was transferred to his pen when
he kept his journals during the War. The present volume contains extracts from
the nine large volumes comprising his war dairies. Among the hundreds of books
about the War, there are few written by surgeons, and we are fortunate to have
this record by Dr. Cushing. We continually wonder, as doubtless he does too, how
he could have written such detailed accounts of the hospital routines, raids, the en-
vironments, the towns visited, the operations performed, after completing seven or
eight major operations in the course of extremely long days, ending in the wee
small hours. Not all the battles were fought at the front: witness the "Battle of
Boston Common."


to. ^6.(.1 J6C 34







A NEW TRISTAN
SPARKENBROKE, by Charles Morgan.
Whether or not Byron was a model for the poet who is the central character of
this novel, there is no doubt that Tristan was. Young Piers Tenniel grows up to be
a poet, and, by the death of his elder brother, twelfth Baron Sparkenbroke. He is
working on his version of the Tristan-Iseult legend when he meets his own Iseult,
Mary, a beautiful girl of eighteen, later the wife of his best friend. Thenceforth their
lives are entangled in an ecstasy which, as in the old legend, brings them more pain
than pleasure. The fire of imagination, the fulfilments of poetry, love, death-these
fill Sparkenbroke's life, and inspire his philosophy, "There is no failure except fail-
ure of the imagination." This quality lights up the lives of Sparkenbroke and Mary,
and with it the author has combined poetic and philosophic insight to make an ab-
sorbing novel.

CONSUMERS ASSERT THEMSELVES
GUINEA PIGS NO MORE, by J. B. Matthews.
CONSUMER COOPERATION IN AMERICA, by Bertram B. Fowler.
Consumers are at last coming to realize that they have long been exploited by
the manufacturers of inferior goods, and that they can organize to remedy the evil.
The first of these books continues the arguments of 100,G00.000 Guinea
Pigs and Skin Deep, shows what consumers can do to secure better products and
more truthful advertising, and advances the idea of a federal Department of the
Consumer. The second tells what consumer cooperatives have already accom-
pilshed in this country (far more than most of us realize) and what future accom-
plishments offer a program of social betterment within the setup of democracy.

AN AMERICAN REBEL
JOHN REED, by Granville Hicks.
John Reed was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1887. Thirty-three years later, he
was buried beneath the Kremlin in Moscow with all the honors awarded Russian
Communists. From a shy boy who was physically a coward, through football days
at school and high-jinks in college, emerged the man who adventured dangerously
in Mexico with the troops of Villa in 1913 and who was called the most brilliant
war correspondent of his day. It was during the Paterson Strike that Reed became
interested in the cause of the working man. He organized one of the first Commun-
istic parties in America, was in Russia during the Bolshevik Revolution and his his-
tory of this movement Ten Days That Shook the World, undoubtedly the best writ-
ing he ever did, is still used as a text in the Russian schools. Reed packed so much
life and action into his thirty-three years he has almost become a legend.

THE ETERNAL TRIANGLE
STRANGE GLORY, by L. H. Myers.
By the author of The Root and the Flower, the setting of this strange, captivat-
ing love story is a Louisiana forest. There are three characters, Paulina, a wealthy
Franco-American girl of cosmopolitan up-bringing, who, by the terms of her fath-
er's will, must return to Louisiana for thirty days of every year. Paulina meets
Wentworth, an eccentric Englishman who lives a hermit's existence in the moss-
hung forest. He exerts a strong influence over the girl and each year she looks
forward eagerly to seeing him again. Later, Paulina meets Stephen, Wentworth's
son-in-law, and falls in love with him. Stephen has a wife in Russia whence he
must return. Paulina loses Stephen, discovers that Wentworth is dying, and the
tragedy of these three lives is clearly developed.







A HUNTER'S RECORD
HUNTING WILD LIFE WITH CAMERA AND FLASHLIGHT, by George
Shiras.
The two volumes of this book contain nearly one thousand photographs, with
explanatory text, of animals, birds, fish, flowers and fungi. Even devotees of rod
and gun will have to admit that the camera and flashlight require fully as much
patience and skill, and the resulting photographs surpass mounted heads and stuffed
fish as trophies of the chase. The first volume deals largely with the Lake Superior
region, the second with wild life of the coasts, mountains and islands of the North
American Continent. Many of the protective laws now in force are due to the un-
tiring efforts of Mr. Shiras. A book outdoor lovers will want to own. Much of the
material has appeared in the National Geographic Magazine.

FRIEND OF STRUGGLING PAINTERS
RECOLLECTIONS OF A PICTURE DEALER, by Aimbroise Vollard.
Vollard bought the paintings of the young Impressionists when no one else
would, and lived to see his taste confirmed and his investment increased many-fold.
His reminiscences contain many interesting sidelights on the men he knew so well-
the struggling painters who haunted his shop and might have starved but for his
patronage. Recent books on the Impressionists all pay tribute to Vollard, which
makes his side of the story doubly interesting.

IN THE CHILDREN'S ROOM
CADDIE WOODLAWN, by Carol Ryrie Brink.
Winner of the Newbery Medal. This is a lively story of frontier days in Wis-
consin. Caddie always manages to find some excitement wherever she is. Based on
the girlhood of the author's grandmother.
TOPGALLANT, by Marjorie Medary.
The story of a herring gull. Illustrated with wash drawings by Lynd Ward.
A CHILD'S STORY OF THE ANIMAL KINGDOM, by Edward G. Huey.
"A rich, complete story of the animal world, both today and yesterday, with
even a hint of tomorrow." For children who love to visit a Zoo.
SING A SONG OF SEASONS, by Flavia Gag.
Fourteen songs for little folks, with easy accompaniments.
FARM ON THE HILL, by Madeline Darrough Horn.
Two little boys visit on their grandfather's farm. Illustrations by Grant Wood.
SCOUT TO EXPLORER, by Paul Siple.
The author's account of the second trip he made to Little America with the
Byrd Expedition.
TRAVELING WITH THE BIRDS, by Rudyerd Boulton.
A splendid book about the how and why of bird migration, with very fine il-
lustrations by Walter A. Weber.
YOUNG WALTER SCOTT, by Eliabeth Janet Gray.
TIRRA LIRRA: RHYMES NEW AND OLD, by Laura E. Richards.
OLD SPAIN IN THE SOUTHWEST, by Nina Otera.
THE MAGIC MUSIC SHOP, by Mary Graham Bonner.
PEE-GLO'O, by Georges Duplaix.
FLYING FOR 1936.
PENNY FOR LUCK, by Florence Crannell Means.
TALKING WIRES, by Clara Lambert.
MIKI AND MARY, by the Petershams.
NICODEMUS AND HIS GRAN'PAPPY, by Inez Hogan.







PULITZER PRIZE AWARDS FOR 1935-36
IDIOT'S DELIGHT, by Robert E. Sherwood. (Drama)
Like most plays, much of the flavor and atmosphere of this play is lost in the
reading, particularly in the scenes where there is singing and dancing. The approach
of an inevitable war is the theme; the setting is a winter resort hotel in the Italian
Alps; the characters: American cabaret dancers, a German scientist, a pair of Eng-
lish honeymooners, a munitions manufacturer and a Russian adventuress. The play
is a mixture of tragedy, melodrama, and musical comedy.
HONEY IN THE HORN, by H. L. Davis. (Fiction)
Mr. Davis' first-hand knowledge of life in Oregon gives his first book a sureness
of touch born of experience. It is the story of a wild, untamed country, before the
coming of railroads, told with quiet humor. This book does much the same for
Oregon as Huckleberry Finn did for the Mississippi country.
STRANGE HOLINESS, by Robert P. Tristram Coffin. (Poetry)
A CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, by Andrew
C. McLaughlin. (History)
THE THOUGHT AND CHARACTER OF WILLIAM JAMES, by Ralph B.
Perry. (Biography)

BOTTOM LAND
SPRING STORM, by Alvin Johnson.
Johnson, the well known economist, at sixty-one writes his first novel. Six-
foot Little Dut of the Bend, shiftless, uneducated, has his philosophies of life and
friendships. Julian Howard, son of a teacher turned impractical and visionary
farmer on the Western river, finds "growing up" full of perplexities and troubles.
Johnson is reliving some of his youth; he knows the Bottom lands and people; the
Bluff, its farmers and towns people; the power and force of the River on land and
lives; the power of prairies and storms; and it all becomes a living part of the
Spring Storm.
I WROTE A BOOK
THE STORY OF A NOVEL, by Thomas Wolfe.
Intensely interesting because really very universal in its emotions, contradictory
and otherwise; emotions which are not peculiarly characteristic of a writer. They
are characteristic of life, of things, of experiences, of confusion, of success, of res-
ponsibility, of uncertainty, of the why and wherefore of life. Of course much does
pertain to actual writing and literary technique and problems. It is an emotional
vortex of a man obsessed with a desire to write; an autobiography of a part of
Thomas Wolfe.
KENTUCKY
THE HEAD O' W-HOLLOW, by Jesse Stuart.
Stories of Kentucky by the Kentucky poet who wrote The Man with a Bull-
Tongue Plow. These folk tales of mountain life are rather sung than told; they are
full of humor and grimness; colloquialisms give special vitality and produce a sense
of individuality to these mountains and their people. "The Head O' W-Hollow" is
"nowhere for many-somewhere for some."

GEORGE ELIOT, by Blanche Colton Williams.
UNPUBLISHED POEMS OF EMILY DICKINSON, ed. by Martha Dickin-
son Bianchi.
PIGEONS AND SPIDERS, by Maurice Maeterlinck.
TOGO AND THE RISE OF JAPANESE SEA POWER, by Edwin A. Falk.
OBITER SCRIPTA, by George Santyana.
EDUCATION BEFORE VERDUN, by Arnold Zweig.




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