Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00078
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: May 1936
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00078
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LAI TR

Published monthly from October to June by e
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University,
of New Hampshire A
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New
Hampshire, under the act of August 24, 1912.
Vol. 11 MAY, 1936 No. 8

CHAMPION OF GOTHIC
MY LIFE IN ARCHITECTURE, by Ralph Adams Cram.
An autobiographical volume by one of the most famous of American
architects, who deals less with his personal life than with his work, his theo-
ries, and his adventures. His love of Gothic and of all medievalism is so deep
that it drew him at an early age into the Anglican Catholic communion, de-
spite the fact that he was born the son of a Unitarian minister at Hampton
Falls, N. H. He has designed many famous churches, including the Cathedral
of St. John the Divine, and some of his work may be seen near at hand, such
as the Chapel of St. Paul's School at Concord, and the new buildings at Phil-
lips Exeter Academy. The last two chapters sum up his philosophy of art
and architecture.

A NOVEL OF YORKSHIRE
SOUTH RIDING, by Winifred Holtby.
There is really no South Riding in Yorkshire, but after reading about it
one feels it must be there, for one has visited it, lived and loved, laughed and
cried with its people. The characters are a miscellany of people in many walks
of life-schoolmistresses, preachers, penurious gentlemen, children, laborers,
and especially aldermen, the latter occupied with the public affairs of the
Riding. The novel is a sociological study of poverty, illness, and struggle, but
the little dramas running through the lives of its people are intensely vivid,
so that it hasn't a dull moment or a wasted word from beginning to end. Nor
is it depressing, for so much can be done by courageous and far-seeing people.
The note at the end, by Vera Brittain, should be read first.

MUST THEY ABANDON HOPE?
T,HE LOST GENERATION, by Maxine Davis.
This is a journalist's account of an extensive motor trip through the
United States to make the acquaintance of the "lost generation" of American
youth: the boys and girls who left, or were graduated from, schools and col-
leges between 1929 and 1934. Graduates of 1935 and this year have a better
chance of securing work, because employers are afraid the others have gone
stale in the interim. The majority of the "lost generation" are still jobless, or
hold temporary or part-time jobs. Miss Davis talked with these young people
wherever she went, and with educators and heads of organizations which
have been in close contact with them. Admitting its limitations, she is en-
thusiastic about the work of the CCC. One very serious aspect of the problem
is the eagerness with which these boys and girls would hail an American
Hitler or Mussolini should one appear on the scene. Now that the situation
has been brought before the public, it awaits permanent remedies.
A0b, O
SAII* 11. I .







THE IDIOSYNCRASIES OF AUTHORS
THE ART OF AUTHORSHIP, by Edwin Valentine Mitchell.
This title is misleading in that one finds merely superficial touches upon
the gentle art of writing. It is rather, a series of anecdotes told of various
authors and considerable detail concerning their habits. Mr. Mitchell tells
us of the workshops of various writers, both past and present, their methods
of work, their use of notebooks, etc. The publishers have not been forgotten
either. Their relationship to authors, booksellers and the public is intelligently
and humorously explained. Mr. Mitchell writes lightly but well and one feels
that this book will both amuse and instruct anyone interested in books and
authors.

REBELLION IN IRELAND
UP IN THE HILLS, by Lord Dunsany.
A party of aboriginal archaeologists from the State of Liberissima ob-
tained government permission to explore a lake-dwelling near Cranogue. The
old women of the district curse these strangers for disturbing the bones of
the dead. Young Mickey Connor, afraid that these curses will glance off the
Africans and strike him takes to the hills with a mighty army of eight other
young lads. There they build eighty fires the first night, and their rivals, the
army of Patsy Heffernan, are amazed at the tremendous numbers encamped
on the heights. Patsy is incensed that another army should camp in the neigh-
borhood which he considers his property. The arrival of the official army
complicates matters still further, but keeps the lads from slaying each other.


AN ANALYSIS OF PERSONALITY
THE ANATOMY OF PERSONALITY, by Clements C. Fry and Howard IV.
Haggard.
"Each and every person is born with fixed traits of personality which es-
tablish his individuality and dominate his behavior. Human character, unlike
personality, is not inborn, it is acquired. The basic traits of personality which
mark one man from another and set off each as an individual, are as fixed and
permanent throughout life as physical peculiarities." The authors attempt a
structural revelation of personality and in order to do this five things must
be given much consideration: the physique, the impulse, the temperament,
the intelligence and the ego. We cannot alter our personality, but we can go
far towards directing and controlling its expressions. There are many case
histories which illustrate the various types of personalities under discussion.

YOUNG JERRY
THE GREEN LION, by Francis Hackett.
Ireland in the early nineties furnishes the background for this novel.
Little Jerry Coyne spent his earliest years on a farm with his sympathetic
but taciturn Uncle Matt. When he was eight he was taken to Kilkenny to live
with his Aunt Agnes and her husband Humphrey Laracy. The child followed
his uncle's example and became an ardent Parnellite, mourning when the
Chief met his untimely death. School under the Christian Brothers and the
Jesuits held many problems for Jerry, as did his discovery of sex and love.
We are apt to become a trifle weary of our young hero before we leave him
on a ship bound for America, and wonder why he did not stay to work for
Ireland. Mr. Hackett is more convincing in the biographical field.







LIFE IN THE FROZEN NORTH
ARCTIC ADVENTURE, by Peter Freuchen.
Arctic Adventure was written by a Dane who stands six feet five and his
book is worthy of his stature. For twenty years he lived and worked among
the Eskimos as scientist, explorer and trader. He had two children by his
Eskimo wife and in every way their marriage was happy and satisfactory.
The Eskimo manners and codes differ widely from ours, but in many in-
stances they put us to shame. There is strong meat in this book at which
some people may quail, but it is about a country which has no place for the
weakling, and where the eternal fight for food and the struggle to keep warm
demands "men who are grit to the core."

RUSSIAN CHAOS
DARKNESS AND DAWN, by Alexei Tolstoi.
The two sisters around whom the story centers are more class symbols
than individuals, but the story does, doubtless, give one a vivid impression
of the confusion of purpose and the devastating chaos preceding the Russian
Revolution of 1917 and on through War and the dawn of Bolshevism into
1918. It is a rather depressing book, with more darkness than dawn.

SUGGESTIONS
YOUR GLANDS AND YOU, by Henry S. Williams.
Dr. Williams explains the functions of the various glands of the body,
the ills which follow glandular mal-adjustments, and suggests ways and
means of keeping these very important functions in order. For the general
lay reader.
A SMALL HOUSE IN THE SUN, by Samuel Chamberlain.
Consisting of very fine full page photographs of houses and of rural and
village scenes of old New England, so typical that no one even slightly ac-
quainted with this section of the country could fail to recognize their authen-
ticity and charm.
NEW WORLD PICTURE, by George W. Gray.
An accurate interpretation of the scientific world view of today, and an
answer to the question: "What is the physical picture of the Universe which
modern science has disclosed?"
WE THE LIVING, by Ayn Rand.
A novel by a young Russian woman presenting through the lives of her
main characters vivid pictures of the conflict between the individual and the
collective, in a land which continually stresses the latter.
THE SCHOOL OF FEMININITY, by Margaret Lawrence.
A stimulating book about women as revealed through some of the out-
standing women prose writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
THE UNIVERSITIES OF EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE AGES, new ed., by
Hastings Rashdall.
THE GARDEN ENCYCLOPEDIA, ed. by E. L. D. Seymour.
A DESIGN FOR SCHOLARSHIP, by Isaiah Bowman.
THE EARLIEST DREAMS, by Nancy Hale.
REACTIONARY ESSAYS ON POETRY AND IDEAS, by Allen Tate.
THE OLD CONTEMPORARIES, by E. V. Lucas.
FLOWERS OF EVIL, tr. from the French of Charles Baudelaire by George Dil-
lon and Edna St. Vincent Millay.
VOYAGE TO GALAPAGOS, by William A. Robinson.






EARN YOUR WAY
MAKE YOURSELF A JOB, by Myron D. Hocken bury.
A student's employment handbook, listing and describing all the usual,
as well as many unusual, jobs open to students who must work their way
through college. Sound advice on finances, budget, scholarships, loans, etc.,
for the student.

JEFFERSON TODAY
THE LIVING JEFFERSON, by James Truslow Adams.
Such phrases as, "Jeffersonian democracy," "Jeffersonian liberalism," and
the like are bandied about today by politicians who have little knowledge of
their meaning or of the true Jefferson and his political duel with Hamilton
centering around the question of whether man could govern himself or must
be governed. This book is not intended merely as a new life of Jefferson; it
is rather a very successful attempt to interpret him and his times to present
day political theorists who ring him in on all possible occasions.

A VARIETY IN NEW FICTION
THE GOLDEN PEACOCK, by Gertrude Atherton.
THE YANKEE BODLEYS, by Naomi Babson.
TWENTY MINUTES TO KILL, by Arthur M. Chase.
THE SLEEPING DEATH, by G. D. H. and Margaret Cole.
JAMAICA INN, by Daphne diu Maurier.
SNOW AGAINST THE SKY, by Mary Dunstan.
WOMAN ALIVE, by Susan Ertz.
MURDER OF A BAD MAN, by Hulbert Footner.
STUBBORN ROOTS, by Elma Godchaux.
ISLAND MAGIC, by Elizabeth Goudge.
THE UNDAUNTED, by Alan Hart.
MAN OF THE STORM, by Ethel Hucston.
THERE'S ONLY ONE, by Sophie Kerr.
THE OCEAN, by Paul Ni-ovoy.
O. HENRY MEMORIAL PRIZE STORIES OF 1935.
UNTIL I FIND, by Edgciumb Pinchon.
TO THE MOUNTAIN, Bradford Smith.
THE BARONESS, by Ernst Wiechert.
THE RIVER HO USE, by Barrett Willoughby.

THE AMERICAN ARMY IN FRANCE, by James G. Harbord.
General Harbord was successively General Pershing's chief of staff, com-
mander of the marine brigade, commander of the Second Division, and com-
mander of the Service of supply in France during the World War, and was in
very logical position to secure at first hand the material for this frank history
of A.E.F. organization and operations. The book has its dull passages, as
well as lively ones, but will certainly take its place near the head of any list
of books on America's part in the war.
PUBIC SPEECH, by Archibald MacLeish.
"We, you-poets all of us" is the philosophy in McLeish's new book of
poetry of twentieth century happenings and conditions through which are
v-aguely reflected deep, serious feelings. The poem contains power and beauty
of imagery. MacLeish, former winner of the Pulitzer prize, must be con-
sidered as one of the most important poets in America today.




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