Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00076
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: March 1936
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00076
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LI

Published monthly from October to June e
Hamilton Smith Library, of the Unive .ty
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New
Hampshire, under the act of August 24, 1912.
Vol. ii MARCH, 1936 No. 6

UNDER THE LICTOR'S EMBLEM
SAWDUST CAESAR: THE UNTOLD HISTORY OF MUSSOLINI AND
FASCISM, by George Seldes.
"To understand Fascism it is necessary to know its suppressed history and
the mind and actions of its spiritual father . writes Mr. Seldes in his fore-
word. He was ejected from Italy in 1925, but returned for a secret visit in 1931
and has always kept in close touch with some of the American journalists permitted
to remain there. Aided by documented facts he presents a very black picture of the
man who stated in 1931, "Italy will never take the initiative of starting a war.
Italy needs peace." Step by step as he climbed the peak of power, II Duce has
applied the fasces to the liberty of the Italian peoples, while the world looks on,
wondering how soon his pinnacle -will crash. "Mussolini has made his mark in
history, but history records the marks of warriors, suppressors and vandals as
well as saviors and liberators."
A JOURNEY TO THE EAST
GRAND TOUR, by Patrick Balfour.
This is a thoroughly enjoyable account of a journey from London to Singa-
pore, and especially interesting because the route lay through little-known coun-
tries. By sea and land to Beirut, thence overland in two Rolls Royces, the party
travelled by adventurous stages to India. Persia was a land of urbanity, and
lovely gardens. Afghanistan was full of friendly, handsome people. In India the
author left his companions and travelled alone to Nepal, which may be entered
only by permission of the Maharajah. Here, after ascending two passes, each
3,000 feet high, he found himself in a country where the absence of civil and re-
ligious strife has given rein to a flowering of art and architecture. There are 500
motor cars in Nepal, each carried over the passes by a hundred and sixty coolies.
The book is copiously illustrated with fine photographs by the author.
A SEQUEL TO "JOSEPHUS"
THE JEW OF ROME, by Lion Feuchtwanger.
Josephus closed with the return of Flavius Josephus to Rome after the fall of
Jerusalem. There he set himself to write a record of his people. "The Jew of
Rome" continues the story of the great historian enjoying the favor of Roman
emperors, basking in the fame of his history of the Jewish people, striving for
domestic happiness with his Jewish wife and son on one hand and the beautiful
Dorion and her son Paulus on the other. He faces compromises at every turn and
yet one gets the impression that life .without them would have 'been dull for Jo-
sephus. One of the many fine dramatic incidents is the arrival of Berenice and
her discovery that her love for Titus no longer strikes a responsive chord. The
,book may be read and enjoyed without a reading of Josephus, but they supplement
each other.
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THE LLANOS OF THE ORINOCO
DESOLATE MARCHES, by Ludovico M. Nesbitt.
Before his trip to Abyssinia, recorded in Hell-Hole of Creation, the author
surveyed a large section of the Llanos of the Orinoco in conjunction with an oil
concession. He describes the land and its people with keen and sympathetic under-
standing and brings before us a very vivid picture of this once flourishing cattle
country. The majority of the people have sought the coastal towns and year by
year the great jungle claims more and more of the territory, while the lot of the
remaining people grows more miserable with each passing season.

AT THE MEETING OF LAND AND SEA
THE BOOK OF THE SEASHORE. by Howard J. Shannon.
This is a fascinating guide for anyone who wants to know more al- out ou'-
seaslhore, for although it describes chiefly the Long Island scene, life and geog-
raphy are similar further north. The author is both poet, artist, and competent
naturalist. He loves the seashore in spite of the growing inhospitality it offers to
the birds, insects, and other animals and plants who try to make their homes there.
He has watched for hours a wasp trying to burrow in the crumbling sand, a gb st
crab stealthily housecleaning, a mother bird pathetically trying to crn'e-:.l h-'r
young where concealment is impossible. His own illustrations of these and many
other features of the shore add to the interest of an absorbing book.

THIS PLEASANT WORLD
PERSONAL PLEASURES, by Rose Macaulay.
Cataloguing her pleasures alphabetically the author proceeds to describe them
br.cfly, with those unexpected twists which are her peculiar genius. Her pleasure;
come less from things themselves than from her thoughts about them, and there-
fore she is equally pleased with opposing activities, such as going to parties, and
not going to parties, believing and disbelieving. She loves Abroad, Bed, Clothes,
Flattery, Heresies, Improving the dictionary, Reading, Showing off, Taking um-
brage, Talking about a new car, and many other occupations. But being a realist
she knows that every pleasure has its pain, or shuts out some other pleasure, and
so she escapes from cloying sweetness with a dash of bitter, caustic comment.

IN AN ENGLISH GARDEN
FOUR HEDGES, A GARDENER'S CHRONICLE, by Clare Leighton.
Those who already know Clare Leighton's skill in 'wood engraving will be
pleased to find that she also writes well. This chronicle of her garden, month by
month, reveals her love of all growing things, plant or animal. The wood engrav-
ings in which she pictures the fruit and flowers, birds and frogs, and workers in
her garden, are the work of an artist who has mastered her medium. Her work is
clean, rich, and expressive. Every line is significant and the variations of texture
are clearly felt.


A BOOK OF OLD SHIPS, by H. B. Culver and Gordon Grant.
A history of divers ships, both long and round, wherein men sailed the seven
seas, from olden days to the i8oos, both for profit and adventure. Containing many
sailor yarns and many fair drawings in color, ink, and diagrams to boot, by Gordon
Grant. And with all an authoritative book conductive of pleasure and profit.








PICTURE OF AN AMERICAN WOMAN
A FOOTNOTE TO FOLLY, by Mary Heaton Vorse.
"This book is not a biography. It is a picture of the world as I saw it during
an important moment of history." Mrs. Vorse, relief worker, labor organizer, was
a correspondent for Harpers and Outlook. She covered such events as the Law-
rence Strike of 1912, where she became aroused to the point of fighting, with pen
and purse, the battles of the downtrodden workers. She writes of her experiences
here in the United States: of the 'Paterson Silk Strike, the tragedy of Sacco and
Vanzetti, the Amalgamated Lockout. She tells us about war-time Europe, the
Versailles Treaty, and European post-war years of famine. All the way through
her narrative, one meets the names of America's well-known rebels in a good
acuse: Lincoln Steffens, Max Eastman, Margaret Sanger, Art Young, and many
others. This book is an important contribution to American social and labor
history.


THE HURRICANE, by Charles Nordhoff and James Hall.
The authors of the Bounty triology have turned to the realm of pure fiction to
produce a stirring and imaginative tale with the setting in tropical Archipelago. En-
thusiastic reviewers compare it favorably with Stevenson's best work.
SECRETS OF THE WHITE LADY, by Captain Henry Landau.
"The White Lady" was perhaps the greatest secret service organization of all
times and operated in occupied Belgium during the World War. Captain Landau
was British officer in command. He gives us here a very complete and authentic
account of the operations of the organization and many accounts of dangerous mis-
sions performed by its agents.
THE SOUND WAGON, by T. S. Stribling.
"A satirical novel relating the political career of Caridus, elected to Congress
on a reform ticket, but controlled by the machine, the bosses, and the gangsters.
A heavy-handed fantasy, in which the characters are puppets and the style is ex-
aggerated."
THE EXILE, by Pearl Buck.
The story of a missionary's wife in China who determinedly set out to give
her children a love for the old home in America and later found that she had become
an exile from that home. This story of sorrow and glory and of sacrifice for an
"understanding" husband is the life of Pearl Buck's mother. Told from a detach-
ed point of view, it is a glowing tribute to those women who went as missionaries,
in the I8oos, to distant lands.
THE ROLLING YEARS, by Agnes Sligh Turnbull.
Another story of American life; this time Almerican life at its best in a Scotch
community in Pennsylvania. The life some of us remember and some do not is told
with knowledge, tenderness and humor. And there are three love stories running
throughout.
GAUDY NIGHT, by Dorothy L. Sayers.
Harriet Vane, mystery writer, acquitted of murder, returns to her college at
Oxford for Gaudy Night celebration and has her first encounter with Poison-Pen.
Terror reigns inside the college quad. With the help of her devoted Lord Peter
Wimsey (and thereby hangs a tale) the mystery is cleared. Side lights on educa-
tion and university life are worth a passing thought. A rattling good mystery
novel.
SIXTY CENTURIES OF SKIING, by Charles M. Dudley.
A book for the ski enthusiast to revel in. History, technique development,
competition and records, guide to skiing centers, many beautiful photographs.








WHITHER SCIENCE?
OUTPOSTS OF SCIENCE, by Bernard Jaffe.
Mr. Jaffe has given us here an admirable summary of what is being done in
the scientific laboratories of America. He has selected the most eminent scientist
in each of thirteen basic fields as a centralizing factor. Thus we have stirring re-
views of the work of Thomas Hunt Morgan in genetics, Maude Slye in cancer
research, McCollum in vitamins, etc. He ,points out the fact that, though America
lead the world in applied science for many years, it is not until very recently that
we have seriously tackled the realm of pure science. The book is written for the
general reader and successfully avoids the pitfall of spectacular exaggeration so
common in books of this type.
UNSOLVED PROBLEMS OF SCIENCE, by Arthur W. Haslett.
The author has selected several problems, more or less familiar to the average
layman, from the fields of physics, geology, anthropology, astronomy, etc. for dis-
cussion. He clearly shows what has already been done towards final solution of
the problem and indicates what lies ahead. Will problems such as the origin of
man, origin of the universe, the existence of life on other planets, for example, be
finally and unquestionably solved by science? Perhaps; who knows?

JAPANESE VILLAGE LIFE
A DAUGHTER OF THE NOHFU, by Etsu Inagaki Sugimoto.
This leisurely story, as beautifully written as Mine. Sugiimoto's other books,
describes the life of middle class farmers in the Japanese village of Takiya. Keomon
San mistrusts and resents the invasion of new ideas and ways "as if the old things
were not good enough." O Haru, her brother and their young friends welcome the
the new ways with enthusiasm, but both old and young make concessions and' life
in Takiya holds much happiness for its citizens.

OTHER RECENT BOOKS
MODERN MAN. HIS BELIEF AND BEHAVIOR, by Harvey Fergusson.
HISTORY OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY, by Edward H. O'Neill.
SON OF MARIETTA, by Johan C. Fabricius.
STORY OF HUEY P. LONG, by Carleton Beals.
BLACK TENTS OF ARABIA, by Carl R. Raswan.
ENVIRONMENT, by Phyllis Bentley.
BIRD FLIGHT, by Gordon C. Aymar.
MRS. ASTOR'S HORSE, by Stanley Walker.
INTERPRETATIONS, 1933-1935, by Walter Lippman.
SOME AMERICAN PEOPLE, by Erskine Caldwell.
MONUMENTS AND MEN OF ANCIENT ROME, by Grant Showerman.
MY FRIEND, JULIA LATHROP, by Jane Addams.
THE TEXAS RANGERS, by Walter P. Webb.

FOR THE CHILDREN
THE GOLDEN HORSESHOE, by Elizabeth Coatsworth.
THE LEGEND OF ST. COLUMBA, by Pradraic Column.
MARTIN PIPPIN IN THE APPLE ORCHARD, by Eleanor Farjeon.
JAMAICA JOHNNY, by Berta and Elmer Hader.
GONE IS GONE, by Wanda Gag.
THREE SIDES OF AGIOCHOOK, by Eric P. Kelley.
VALIANT, DOG OF THE TIMBERLINE, by John S. O'Brien.
BOBO DEE, by Lionel Reid.
ELEPHANTS, by William W. Robinson.




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