Title: Library lantern
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00075
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: February 1936
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00075
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LANTERN

Published monthly from October top.n b* thi ) p b
Hamilton Smith Library, of t I I ersity 1 A" i
of New Hampsh" '
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, a ost office at Dur New
Hampshire, under the act of Aa 2 1
VoL. 11 FEBRUARY, IW l7 No. 5

THE NEW CRIMI
SCIENCE versus CRIME, by Henry Morton F',.i; ,..
If you have decided to become a criminal, read this thril-r hanc-change your
mind. Mr. Robinson uses actual cases to demonstrate the amazing advances being
made in this field. Armed with a formidable array of comparison microscopes, helix-
ometers, test tubes, Keeler polygraphs, the dangerous drug scopolamine, and other
tools of their trade, scientific investigators find eloquent clues even in grains of dust.
"But crime, despite our imposing batteries of scientific paraphernalia, still flour-
ishes," due to the existing evils which the author sums up in his last chapter, Social
Indictment. Until these evils are remedied, crime will remain a major problem
of society.
THE WAY OF EXCELLENCE
WHAT DOES AMERICA M'EAN? by Alexander Meiklejohn.
"The supposed meaninglessness of the term 'Spirit' is, in my opinion, the
most serious symptom of a kind of intellectual madness which has fallen upon the
mind of our current America." With these words the author prefaces his discus-
sion of the American ideal. Spirit is inner compulsion, not passive acceptance, and
thus our attitude to our ideals, liberty, justice, education, should be, not "what do
we get?" but "what do we give?" In this light the principle of freedom of speech
is seen to be fundamental, while that of freedom as relating to the acquisition
of property is false. This is clearly recognized in the first and fifth amendments to
the Constitution. The freedom for which we must strive is that to engage in "dar-
ing, cooperative, creative search for truth." That is the way of excellence.

A JAPANESE FEMINIST
FACING TWO WAYS, by Baroness Shidzue Ishimoto.
When Shidzue Hirota was born in 1897, Japan had just begun to throw off
the yoke of feudalism. The author's account of her childhood is like an exotic fairy
tale to Occidentals. Her father, a true samurai, had Western training, but their
home life adhered closely to old Japanese traditions. She grew to love her husband
and his "humanistic ideals," and when he wrote to her from America in 1919,
"Come to me if you will educate yourself, to feed yourself with the knowledge of
the world, to prepare yourself to swim abreast the world's new tide," she left her
two small sons and accepted his challenge. After America came Europe and the
return to Japan. She ardently worked for the cause of feminism with her husband's
approval. But Baron Ishimoto's ideals were shattered and gradually he looked with
disfavor on his wife and wished her to return to the bondage from which he had
freed her. However, the freedom of the Japanese women gains ground slowly, and
the brave baroness refuses to abandon the fight on a chance of regaining her own
lost happiness. After her last trip to America she established a Birth Control
Clinic. An outstanding book in the deluge of autobiogaphies.



U. it. d S%0 S c. L Io






"F. P. A."
THE DIARY OF OUR OWN SAMUEL PEPYS, by Franklin P. Adams.
Two volumes of extracts from Mr. Adams' column first appearing in the
New York Evening Mail in 1911, continued in the New York Tribune, the Newz,
York World, and a regular feature of the New York Herald Tribune since March
2, 1931. His astute, humorous observations of the plays, books, and people of the
day, are written in the style of the famous diarist, and many a chuckle awaits the
reader. We feel sure Samuel would approve of this entry: "Friday, April o1
(1931). 'Very betimes up, and to the office, and a pretty girl there, whose name
I do not know asked what I did mean by betimes, and sometimes it means one thing
and sometimes another, and this morning it meant ten minutes past seven.' "

WOOLLCOTT WILL SELL IT-
THE WOOLLCOTT READER, by Alexander Woollcott.
This collection contains some of the novels, short stories, essays, and miscel-
lanea which have given Mr. Woollcott "the deepest and most abiding satisfaction."
Some of these works are still read by many people; others have been forgotten,
and still others were never well known. In the foreword to the book, the Town
Crier gives his reasons for choosing these particular works and after each selec-
tion he writes an afterword in his own inimitable manner. It is only logical that
not all the things in the collection will please each reader, but there is variety, and
something to please everyone.
NARRATIVE OF THE SEA
VICTORIOUS TROY, by John Masefield.
In the story of the Hurrying Angel, a participator in the Grian Race from
Melbourne to England in 1922, Masefield has given us "the finest description of a
circular storm at sea that has ever been written." It is a good story peopled by
human beings. The plot: The captain, a fine seaman, commits an error in judge-
ment, due to anger with his mate, and lands the ship spank into the midst of a ty-
phoon in the Indian Ocean. The officers are all swept overboard, the captain dis-
abled. A young midshipman of eighteen years who has had three years experience
on the sea, clears the ship's deck and brings her into port.

AN AMERICAN FAMILY
IF I HAVE FOUR APPLES, by Josephine Lawrence.
This is not a story of shiftless people; it's about the hard-working middle-class
family of small means who simply will not face arithmetic. Janet Bradley, a news-
paper woman, runs a budget in connection with her column. In an advisory capac-
ity, she meets the Hoes, a family which has no conception of the theory: so much
earned, so much to spend. Father Hoe is paying for a house on which there are
already two mortgages and any number of assessments and taxes. The son, men-
tally incapable of finishing a high school course, is angry because there is no money
to send him to college. A daughter buys a modernistic dining room set and has to
pay half her salary on it every week. Everything the family can possibly buy on
the installment plan they have. Even unto death: Mother Hoe buys a cemetery lot
on the installment plan !
BELOMOR.
This is the story of the building of a canal between the Baltic Sea and the
White Sea-a mammoth enterprise directed by thirty-seven Cheka officials and
labored over by tens -of thousands of Russia's prisoners. The canal, 227 kilometers
long, hacked out of virgin forests, glacial rock and torrential rivers, was com-
pleted in twenty months. This narrative was written by thirty-four people under
the direction of the government, and as such, must be read for what it is worth.






AN IMPORTANT DOCUMENT
WITH NAPOLEON IN RUSSIA; memoirs of General de Caulaincourt.
Romantically recovered from the ruins of a chateau destroyed in the Great
War, these memoirs are first published more than a century after they were written.
The author was aide-de-camp, constant companion, and Boswell to Napoleon in
the Russian campaign, and his notes, jotted down in odd moments, throw much
new light on that ill-fated enterprise. They are "an answer to those who have
claimed that men could neither think nor speak nor write under his reign," for de
Caulaincourt spoke plainly to Napoleon, and if his advice was not heeded it was
at least tolerated. That de Caulaincourt was the wiser man can readily be seen, and
if his advice had been taken-in a campaign subtended by so many ifs-history
might have been very different. Napoleon's defeat resulted from his dislike of fac-
ing facts and his blind, pathetic trust in his nonexistent good fortune.

NEW ENGLAND DETERMINATION
COUNT RUMFORD OF MASSACHUSETTS, by James Alden Thompson.
Benjamin Thompson, the handsome, vain, cold blooded New Englander, left
Rumford (now Concord, New Hampshire) to join the British during the Revo-
lution. Later, in Bavaria, he rose to power, acquired money and titles and proved
no mean scientist and reformer. He is not greatly admired by his distant relative
and biographer whose chatty account of Rumford is full of irrelevant anecdotes
of life in the American colonies and of Europe in general.

GAY AND INDOMITABLE
BEAUMARCHAIS; adventurer in the century of women, by Paul Frischauer.
Caron-fils, son of the French watchmaker seems to prove the old adage, "If
you want a thing badly enough you are sure to get it." For he, without money,
power or friends determined to become an aristocrat and that during Louis XV's
reign. Largely through women and his own charm he became de Beaumarchais, a
power in the French court and force in its destruction. He is best known as a
pamphleteer and author of the Barber of Seville. A book more like a romantic
novel than biography yet full of fascinating history of French life of the times.

OF PARTICULAR INTEREST ON THE CAMPUS
THIS TRADE OF WRITING, by Edward Weeks.
Viewpoints, suggestions, reminiscences and much advice which should prove
very useful to the amateur and would-be-writer. Includes lists of best books and
best sellers.
THE AMERICAN COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY, by Charles F. Thing.
Dr. Thwing has written many books on the problems of college life and ad-
ministration. The present volume seeks particularly to point out the necessity of
proper coordination of the principle of liberty, or academic freedom, and the prin-
ciple of unity. Among interesting chapters are to be found: The State University,
The Faculty, The Students, The Fraternity, Athletics.
REVOLT ON THE CAMPUS, by James Wechsler.
A sympathetic account of radical, perhaps liberal, tendencies of students in
American universities and colleges. Mr. Wechsler presents evidences of the sup-
pression of those holding unorthodox opinions by college authorities and, though
few will agree entirely with the viewpoint of the book, the serious educator cannot
fail to find it challenging.






THE ROMANCE OF TEACHING
AND GLADLY TEACH; reminiscences by Bliss Perry.
At the close of this book one is surprised to learn that the author is seventy-
five, for he writes with the vigour of a young man. It is not difficult to see why he
remains youthful, for his life has been marked by great enthusiasm for his voca-
tion, his hobbies, for all that makes life richer. Graduating from Williams, he be-
came a member of its faculty. To Princeton, and finally to Harvard, he gave many
years of service, interrupted by study and travel abroad, and by ten years as editor
of the Atlantic Monthly. He loved teaching and the thrill of holding the attention
of a large audience. He enjoyed the friendship of many famous people, including
Woodrow Wilson, whose character he draws with sympathetic understanding. He
writes from his quiet retreat after life's excitement, with a charming sense of hu-
mour, philosophical appreciation of the past, and faith in the progress of humanity.

OTHER RECENT ACQUISITIONS
KARL MARX; THE STORY OF HIS LIFE, by Franz Mehring.
ECONOMIC PLANNING, by G. D. H. Cole.
THE CRISIS OF THE MIDDLE CLASS, by Lewis Corey.
BRIGHTON, by Osbert Sitwell and Margaret Barton.
A STONE CAME ROLLING, by Fielding Burke.
HOW TO UNDERSTAND MUSIC, by Oscar Thompson.
THE U. S. IN WORLD AFFAIRS, 1934-1935.
WINTERSET, by Maxwell Anderson.
FAREWELL TO POVERTY, by Maurice Parmelee.
STEEL-DICTATOR, by Harvey O'Connor.
IN PRAISE OF IDLENESS AND OTHER ESSAYS, by Bertrand Russell.
BLOOD RELATIONS, by Sir Philip Gibbs.
BUILDING YOUR LIFE, by M. E. Bennett.
PIONEERING WITH THE RED CROSS, by Ernest Bicknell.
ROAD TO GLORY, by Frederick B. Austin.
CONTINENTAL PLAYS, ed. by Thomas H. Dickinson.
MARK.HOPKINS, by J. H. Denison.
HONOUR CAME BACK, by Naomi Jacob.
THE GREAT TRADITION, by Granville Hicks.

LIBRARY NOTES
Among new subscriptions to periodicals of general interest are the following:
Business Week, a journal of business news and interpretation; Christendom, a new
quarterly, without denominational interest, which promises to become a leader in
the field; Christian Century, an old stand-by in its field; Commonweal, from the
Catholic point of view but of high literary merit; Franklin Lectures, a new venture
with the avowed purpose of publishing selected graduate school theses; Geograph-
ical Review, a monthly with general articles; reviews, comments, etc.; Sewanee
Review, a leading literary quarterly since 1892; Vital Speeches, fortnightly, a new
organ for the publication of important public speeches of the day.
During the past summer, through the breaking up of the Library .rt Club,
the library received several picture exhibit collections. Appropriate exhibits will be
arranged later.
There has been a great demand for photographic copies of the Travis painting
of the Oyster River Plantation of about 1825, which was exhibited in the library
during the past fall. Mr. Sawyer very kindly consented to permit copies to be made
of the painting.
Local people should note that the library now has a private telephone line-
the new number is 294.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs