Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00072
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1935
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00072
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN

Published monthly from October to June by the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University '
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham,. N-'
Hampshire, under the act of August 24, 1912.
Vol. II NOVEMBER, 1935 No. 2

MASTERS IN THE ART OF LIVING
MY COUNTRY AND MY PEOPLE, by Lin Yutang.
The author, a Chinese familiar with the West and with its history and cul-
ture, had evidently been attracted to Western civilization, but rediscovered and
returned to his cultural inheritance. He has written a charming analysis of the
Chinese character, recognizing its defects while dwelling on its virtues. From the
Chinese Occidentals one can learn a great deal about contentment, tolerance, and
the whole art of living. If the Chinese lack some of the heroic virtues of the West,
they have learned equanimity, patience, and the ability to make a commonplace life
enjoyable. The author examines the social, political, and artistic life of his people.
He has written a book which should not be missed.


A LEGENDARY QUEEN
MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTLAND AND THE ISLES, by Stefan Zweig.
Mary Stuart and Elizabeth Tudor typify extremes: Mary, the staunch Ca-
tholic, clinging to the remains of chivalry, romance and humanistic culture, living
and ruling as by divine right for herself alone, always the queen; Elizabeth, the
Protestant, at the brink of change, realizing after her hard youth and dangerous
struggles that being a queen is an insecure occupation and that she would live to
posterity only as England became prosperous and great. From an abundance of
conflicting material of this period, Zweig shows us Mary in an unbiased light. She
lives again as one of the most charming women in history, whose early life was
quiescent and luxurious with ease and pleasure, but whose short span of vital living
was full of passion, action and violence. Though very popular in tone, this bio-
graphy is one of the most dependable-certainly one of the most readable-yet
written about this fascinating character.


THE WILL TO HAPPINESS
VEIN OF IRON, by Ellen Glasgow.
In a valley of Virginia lived a family rooted there for generations: John
Fincastle, outcast philosopher; his mother, stronghold of Calvinism; his fragile
wife Mary Evelyn, to whom a blue bowl was more than morning prayers; his
daughter Ada, awaiting the simple happiness of her marriage to Ralph McBride.
Poverty, illness, and wrecked lives fail to break them, for "We're made that way,
the Fincastles. Even when we're broken-hearted, we still love life and enjoy it."
Through tragedy, war, and depression, the vein of iron in their souls sustains them.
A very fine work which dwells on the victory of the human soul over adverse
circumstances.








STEAMBOAT PIONEER IN AMERICA
POOR JOHN FITCH, by Thomas Boyd.
From Fitch's diary, and other early American source material, Mr. Boyd
has succeeded admirably in rescuing a long forgotten mechanical genius from ob-
livion. We commonly think of Robert Fulton as the father of the steamboat, but
John Fitch actually built and successfully operated four such ships ten years before
Fulton's Clermont made its historic trip up the Hudson. Fitch was born in 1743
of poverty ridden parents. His life was filled with unhappiness and frustration.
possibly due to peculiarities in his character not designed to make him a popular
figure. His apprenticeship in the clock and watch making business was not sucesss-
ful. A nagging wife was no great help. The book follows his life closely, giving
accounts of his travels, his evasion of conscription in the War of Independence, his
capture by Indians on the Ohio, his plans for the steamboat, and is a good picture
of I8th century America, as well as a very interesting biography.


CHILDREN'S BOOKS
(The following represents a selection from among the recent juvenile books,
and are listed at this time by reason of the annual nation-wide celebration of Chil-
dren's Book Week, November 17-23, this year.)
DOBRY, by Monica Shannon.
Winner of the Newbery Medal for 1934, this is the story of a Bulgarian
peasant boy who longs to be a sculptor. His understanding grand father helps him
convince his mother that life holds other things besides fields to till. Do you
know that in Bulgaria the people shake their heads for "Yes" and nod them for
"No?" All thru the story are interesting bits of folklore and peasant customs.
Striking illustrations by Atanas Kachamakoff.
LUCK OF THE ROLL AND GO, by Ruth and Latrobe Carroll.
A life of ease with two staid 'Portland maidens proves too tame for a certain
tiger-striped kitten. Down to the docks he goes and stows away on the Roll and
Go. The ship soon sails on an expedition to the Antarctic, and Terry, the cook,
names the kitten "Luck." He lives up to his name and has adventures enough to
satisfy any cat with seafaring blood in his veins.
BOY ON HORSEBACK, by Lincoln Steffens.
The author retells for boys the story of his boyhood, college days, and find-
ing his first job. Many a lad will envy him the fun he had with his pony.
JANE ADDAMS OF HULL HOUSE, by Winifred E. Wise.
Miss Addams was one of the greatest women of our times and American?
are justly proud of her. This account of her life was authorized by her for young
people, and includes a number of photographs reproduced thru her courtesy.
STREET FAIR, by Marjorie Fischer.
John and Anna, two American children visiting France with their mother,
go off on their own and have all kinds of experiences. It is a good thing they have
the Duchess for a friend, because they really deserve a scolding.
JOHNNY CROW'S NEW GARDEN, by L. Leslie Brooke.
Our old friend Johnny Crow is back again with Lion, Puffin, and all the
other animals and 'birds you like so well, and there are some new ones too, "in
Johnny Crow's new garden."
CHILDREN OF THE NORTHLIGHTS, by Ingri and Edgar D'Aulaire.
The story of two Lapp children, Lise and Lasse, and their life in the land
of the northern lights. Beautifully illustrated with lithographs.








DOWN DOWN THE MOUNTAIN, by Ellis Credle.
Little children will love to hear how Hetty and Hank earned "creaky,
squeaky" shoes.
FARM BOY, by Phil Stong.
Harlan goes to visit at his grandfather's farm and feels superior because he
is a city boy, but Karl and Guy show him what a fine place the farm is and they
dig in the Indian Mound for treasure.
NORTH AFTER SEALS, by Thamas Williamson.
Bob Galloway on his first seal hunt aboard the Ranger, learns a great
deal about "swiles" and earns some much needed money.
COOT CLUB, by Arthur Ransome.
Dorothea and Dick spend a jolly vacation on a sailing yacht, with Tom and
the twins, Port and Starboard.
A CHILD WENT FORTH, by Helen MacKnight Doyle, M.D.
The stirring autobiography of a successful woman doctor who began her
career in the West when there was strenuous opposition to women entering such
a profession. In addition, she was a successful wife and mother.
ENOS MILLS OF THE ROCKIES, by Hildegarde Hawthorne and Esther Mills.
As a young boy in Kansas, Enos Mills felt the lure of the Rocky Mountains
from stories his mother told him. When only fourteen, he set out alone to find the
land he loved, and which became thru his efforts the Rocky Mountain National
Park

A MAN STANDS FORTH
SEVEN PILLARS OF WISDOM, by T. E. Lawrence.
Writing of the "everlasting masks" behind which we are prone to meet our
fellow men, George Matthew Adams says, "Every once in a while in a life-time,
most of us come across someone who has left his mask at home-and what an
event! Like suddenly discovering something rare and beautiful that has been hunt-
ed for over long long years of time." Colonel Lawrence in his book, has left his
mask at home, thereby giving to the world a rich legacy. This man ruthlessly
mined trains and bridges, led the Arabs night and day, yet, after one surprise at-
tack at night, felt compelled by an inner something to straighten the tangled Tur-
kish corpses strewn upon the desert sand. Reading his story, we realize more than
ever how inevitable it was that legends should grow about him. He died convinced
that he had failed to write a great book, but we cannot share his conviction. The
Seven Pillars of Wisdom is a book for the ages.


"THE PRIMITIVE OF A NEW ART"
PAUL CEZANNE, by Gerstle Mack.
The most complete biography of Cezanne yet published, founded on letters,
interviews with surviving relatives and friends, and other source material. For
the most part Cezanne's life was outwardly uninteresting, but it was motivated by
a compulsion to paint, the intensity of which is rare even among painters. His
father, after futile attempts to make of him a banker, at last yielded to this com-
pulsion, and Cezanne went to Paris. For a time he joined forces with the Impres-
sionists, but eventually broke with them and gave to painting a new conception of
solidity which has influenced all subsequent painters. The book contains much
enlightening material about Cezanne's relations with his friends, of whom Zola was
the chief. His character is rounded out and some myths concerning it dispelled.
Many hitherto unpublished letters are included, as well as the poetry which he
wrote in his letters to Zola.








A LIFE OF AUDUBON
SINGING IN THE WILDERNESS, by Donald C. Peattie.
There was as much color and action in John James Audubon's life as there
was in the pictures of the birds which he painted. Born in the West Indies, he
was taken to France while still a child. He studied art under David in Paris after
he had failed at a naval school where his father had sent him. When he was
eighteen, he returned to America where he married an English girl, Lucy Bakewell.
John was a poor business man and became a financial failure. This is not intended
to be a strict biography, the facts concerning the man may be found in any ency-
clopedia. The most significant incidents in Audubon's life are included and alto-
gether it is a highly imaginative and romantic picture of his home life, his search
for birds to paint and his hardships in gaining recognition as an authoritative paint-
er of American bird-life.

THIS IS BOSTON
BOSTON AND THE BOSTON LEGEND, by Lucius Beebe.
Beebe says of his book "it is selected interludes, episodes, personalities, and
aspects of Boston past and present . Bostnn is mellow and mature . Bos-
ton has supplied the American scene not only with Peace Jubilees and Browning
societies but with some of the most gorgeous rioting, hardest drinking . make
no mistake Boston has been as good at uproar as at tatting." The numerous
pencil sketches are delightful old acquaintances.

THE STARS LOOK DOWN, by A. J. Cronin.
The sanctity of human life is the theme of this highly convincing picture of
life in a North England mining community for the years 1903-1933. The story
centers around three characters, David Fenwick, pit-boy, school teacher and Labour
M.P.; Joe Gowlan, miner, bookie's tout and war profiteer; Arthur Barras, paci-
fist and owner of the mines in Sleescale Borough. The most powerful piece of
writing in the book is the account of the flooding of the mine in which David's
father, brother and several other men are trapped. Like Mtr. Cronin's other novels,
this one is lengthy but very good entertainment.

WE RECOMMEND
GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS, by Stuart Chase.
HOW TO WATCH FOOTBALL, by Lou Little.
THE INQUISITOR, by Hugh Walpole.
SNAKE HUNTER'S HOLIDAY, by Raymond Dtimars and William Bridges.
CELL 202, SING SING, by Lewis E. Lawes.
ULYSSES S. GRANT; POLITICIAN, by W. B. Hesseltine.
TRIAL BALANCES, ed. by Ann Winslow.
INVISIBLE LANDSCAPES, by Edgar Lee Masters.
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN, by Hesketh Pearson.
STEEL OF EMPIRE, by John M. Gibbon.
STUMBLING INTO SOCIALISM, by David Lawrence.

DURHAM IN 1825
Through the courtesy of Mr. James C. Sawyer, we are happy to exhibit
during November a painting of the Oyster River, Durham, as seen from Sullivan's
wharf about 1825. It is an accurate reproduction of houses, stores, wharves,
shipbuilding and shipping activities. The painting has been beautifully executed
by Mr. Stuart Travis, talented American artist, from early photographs and draw-
ings and under Mr. Sawyer's direction.




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