Title: Library lantern
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00071
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: October 1935
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00071
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LA

Published monthly from October to Jun e
Hamilton Smith Library, of the Uni ,
of New Hampshire '
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the posls cce at Durham,
Hampshire, under the act of August 24, .
Vol. II OCTOBER, 1935

OUR DAILY PRESS
FREEDOM OF THE PRESS, by George Seldes.
The picture that Mr. Seldes gives of our newspaper press, past and present,
is not a very wholesome one. He shows conclusively that while we have had a
few liberal, fearless newspapers we 'have never really had a free press. There has
been wholesale suppression of vital news. Staggering sums have been spent by big
business interests in propagandizing the American people by means of a systematic
control of the press. Editors and owners have been rather plainly told that unless
they vigorously fought for or against certain public questions vast advertising
support would be withdrawn. Is it then possible to have a free press when a cer-
tain large daily costs fourteen cents a copy and sells for two, the advertiser pay-
ing the difference? Mr. Seldes cites proof of his statements, naming particular
newspapers for good or bad deeds. He shows little optimism for better conditions
to come, but does see a ray of hope in the recent organization of the American
Newspaper Guild. He presents a roll of honor of newspapers which have dis-
tinguished themselves at times, but lists the Manchester Guardian as the only
large newspaper in the world today which is wholly beyond reproach.

A WISE GUIDE TO LIVING
ORDINARY DIFFICULTIES OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE, by John R. Oliver.
This book is written for the "forgotten man" whose mental difficulties are
not serious enough to attract the attention of a psychiatrist. No matter how
typically average you may be, you have questions and problems which are serious
to you but which you can seldom discuss with anyone. A wise man who is at once
physician, psychiatrist, and priest, discusses such problems (almost surely includ-
ing some of your own) as they occur in childhood, adolescence, and youth, and
to the man and woman going through life to middle and old age. His chapter on
babies and children is more valuable than many books on child training. The
section on college students should be widely read, particularly by "pre-meds,"
to whom he feels especially close. The problems and adjustments of the married
and the unmarried are discussed frankly and wisely. In fact it is a book from
which almost everyone can profit, for it is written from the vast experience of a
man who has helped many people over their difficulties.

A NEW PASSAGE TO THE INDIES
NORTH TO THE ORIENT, by Anne Morrow Lindbergh.
An interesting account of the flight which the Lindberghs made during the
summer of 1931 from Washington, northwestward over Canada and Alaska, to
Nanking. Mrs. Lindbergh who was the radio operator of the Sirius possesses
gentle literary charm and good humor. Her description of preparations for such
a trip is a revelation. This is not a day-by-day account of the flight; it is a selec-
tion of the occurrences which were most outstanding to the author. There are
maps by Charles Lindhergh.
O O PERIODtCAL


9al r~lc 13







BAPTISM OF FIRE
TEMPEST OVER MEXICO, by Rosa E. King.
Faced with the necessity of making a living for herself and her two children
Mrs. King, an English widow, started a tea room in Cuernavaca and later bought
the Bella Vista Hotel which proved a most successful venture. Among her guests
were some of Mexico's leading figures who frequently told her their plans and as-
pirations, since her British citizenship made her a neutral in Mexican affairs. Then
the Revolution broke in fury with its counter-revolutions, and the leadership
passed in quick succession from Diaz to Madero, Huerta, Carranza, and finally to
Obregon. Cuernavaca lies in the Valley of Morelos the center of Zapata's activi-
ties, and the town changed from a fashionable resort to a military stronghold. Tr
Mrs. King it was a Mexican revolution, and not until after the Helene Ponti-
pirani episode with its dire consequences did she realize that she was one with
the people of Mexico. She was one of the two thousand survivors of the terrible
flight from Cuernavaca, but her health was so broken that later she had to aban-
don every business she took up. Gradually order emerged in the land and Mrs.
King gives the palm to Calles for the "stability and success of the new regime."
In 1928 she could resist the call of Cuernavaca no longer and the Bella \Vista
under a new management again claimed her. The story is told with a sincerity
and lack of self-pity that will commend it to many in addition to its historical
significance.
PLACE OF MIRACLES
ASYLUM, by William Seabrook.
Reporter of many strange adventures, Mr. Seabrook now relates his expe-
riences in a mental hospital to which he was self-committed in 1933 to be cured
of acute alcoholism. He candidly describes his own progress, the patients with
whom he lived, and the daily routine of the institution. In his "cure" there seems
to have been a marked absence of the reputed sufferings of a drunkard deprived
of his drink, but perhaps that was because he was so interested in everyone else
in the institution. He says of visitors, "They are invariably initially embarrassed
to be visiting this sort df place, to have one of their 'dear ones' shut up in it."
They soon came to the conclusion that a mental disease was no more disgraceful
than a physical one and accepted the asylum in its true light; hospital of the
mind. Readers of Clifford Beers' book, A Mind That Found Itself, first published
about thirty years ago, will be interested in comparing present-day treatment of
mental cases as described by Mr. Seabrook, with the appalling treatment experi-
enced by Mr. Beers, and which he did much to remedy after his release.

A EUROPEAN STATESMAN
THOMAS MORE, by Raymond Wt. Chambers.
In 1909 Sir Thomas More was canonized on the 400 anniversary of his
death. "What is the meaning of More's life and death to one not of (his) the
fold?" is the question Professor Chambers attempts to answer in this scholarly
biography. Enlivened with bits of quaint conversation, it is neither dull nor diffi-
cult, and we clearly see this genial and ironical man as the statesman, the scholar,
and by inference the saint.

HISTORY TELESCOPED
4AN ATLAS OF EUROPEAN HISTORY, by J. F. Horrabin.
Consists of about seventy maps which try to tell, in baldest outlines, the main
European story from the break-up of the Roman Empire down to the Great War.
Each map is accompanied by a brief description and the book as a whole provides
a good background for the general understanding of contemporary European pol-
itics. A companion volume to Atlas of Current Affairs, by the same author.







STILL A VITAL CREED
LIBERALISM AND SOCIAL ACTION, by John Dewey.
America's greatest philosopher discusses the creed which he believes is more
essential to the social good today than ever before. Beginning with a chapter on
the history of liberalism, he shows how its early concept of the rights of individu-
als as opposed to organized society became in recent times a defense of the status
quo and an argument against social progress, resulting in the charge of impotence
heard today on many sides against it. In the second chapter he portrays the crisis
in liberalism, points out the deficiencies of its early tenets, and shows 'how it may
resolve the crisis by the realization that the problem of democracy is not only the
negative one of curbing restraints, but also that of feeding, sustaining, and direct-
ing the powers of individuals. In the final chapter he discusses a renascent liberal-
ism, working for "a social organization that will make possible effective liberty and
opportunity for personal growth in mind and spirit in all individuals." A prere-
quisite of such an organization is material security for all, hence liberalism, which
formerly supported a laissez faire economy must today stand for a controlled
economy. Liberalism must be radical today, adopting the method of scientific
planning to produce a better social order.

FICTION
LUCY GAYHEART, by Willa Cather.
A new novel by Willa Cather is an event eagerly awaited, but in Lucy Gayheart
she is not at her best. Her treatment of an old situation is fresh and interesting,
but the characters, though real for the most part, are at times disappointing. The
plot might perhaps be interpreted as illustrating the theme that love cannot last,
that life is the really desired lover, but that even that may be snatched away.
WINTER ORCHARD, by Josephine Johnson.
This is a book of short stories written by the winner of the Pulitzer prize in
1935. Among them are The Quiet Day, dream-like in quality; Dark, the story of a
blind man who recovers his sight for a short time; Unposted Letter, written by a
woman to the man who had gone away, a complete renunciation of all that was
dear to her; I Was Sixteen, the girl who spent days dreaming of the beautiful pie
she would make which would be bought by her hero at an apple pie supper. There
are detailed descriptions of minor sensations of which the ordinary person is sel-
dom aware, but so powerful is Miss Johnson's prose that the reader becomes con-
scious of the detail and of the author's intensely sympathetic understanding of
humanity.
STORM SIGNALS, by Joseph C. Lincoln.
The storm at sea during which young Captain Ben Snow lost the Pearl is a
mere squall compared to the storm of suspicion and open enmity that he has to
weather when he returns injured to Bayport. To complicate matters he is in love
with the daughter of his bitterest enemy, peppery old Heman Evans. Throughout
the story the rumble of the Civil War disturbs the peace of Cape Cod, and the
Bayporters who take their politics seriously, to say the least, rally to the colors.
Meanwhile, Captain Cyrus Snow does a little detective work in Ben's cause and
produces unexpected results.
ARCTIC SOS, by Joseph M,. Velter.
An uncanny tale of a geographer, a wireless operator, and a hunter on a
Siberian wireless outpost. The long snowy night of solitude and gloom and the
howling winds work powerfully with strange adventures to create an eery and
absorbing story. Velter is tremendously popular in Germany and Great Britain,
his novels being compared to those of Jack London.







AMONG THE RECENT BOOKS
FOR AUTHORS ONLY, AND OTHER GLOOMY ESSAYS, by Kenneth
Roberts.
The author of Arundel here gives us a delightful collection of essays rang-
ing in subject matter from the title essay, in which he chides our English cousins
for their total inability to reproduce the speech of an American in their fiction
(as exemplified by a distinguished English author who puts the words "Wa-al, I
reckon I guess we ain't fur from the lion-huntin!" into the mouth of a wealthy
Detroit manufacturer), to the essay Golf in which he plays with the country's
great but lays claim to the distinction of being the most proficient hoop-shot
player in the game.
SOLOMON, MY SON, by John Erskine.
This is another of Erskine's spicy versions of an old story. Had Solomon
lived in America today the building of his Temple would doubtless have been a
PW A project, and surely King Hiram of Tyre would have been a zealous sup-
porter of the C C C.
THE DU PONT DYNASTY, by John K. Winkler.
In his usual journalistic style Mr. Winkler follows the fortunes of five gen-
erations of the Du Pont clan, a family which today controls vast industries valued
at around five billion dollars. An interesting and illuminating book.
HISTORIC OPINIONS OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT.
A collection of sixteen selected issue and test cases illustrative of the operation
of the Court and our constitutional system. Includes the recent NRA decision.

THE MAN WITHOUT A HOME, by Rupert Hughes.
I WAS HITLER'S PRISONER, by Stefan Lorant.
AN EASTERN ODYSSEY, by Georges Le Fevre.
THE FURYS, by James Hanley.
THE POST-WAR WORLD, by J. H. Jackson.
FELICIANA, by Stark Young.
THE LIBERAL TRADITION, by Lewis W. Douglas.
DICTIONARY OF MODERN AMERICAN USAGE, by H. W. Hor-ill.
AMHERST; THE STORY OF A NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE, by Claude
M. Fuess.

LIBRARY NOTES
An interesting exhibit of articles, chiefly woodcarving, made in handicraft
courses at Camp Tripoli, North Woodstock, will be on display in room 201
until about October 12. ... A new and revised edition of the Library Hand-
book is off the press. Copies have been delivered to all freshmen; others who
are interested may secure copies on application .... The library welcomes the
return of Miss Emily Washburn as reference librarian. Since last seen regularly
at the circulation desk she has been exposed to a library school year at Pratt
Institute. .. A copy of the much heralded unabridged edition of Seven Pillars of
Wisdom has been received. We hope that the four pillars, now under repair, adorn-
ing the library front will entice more students to seek wisdom within our doors.
S. With the Eyes of the world on Ethiopia Ncsbitt's Hell-hole of Creation
should be in great demand. One of the finest travel books in recent years, it is one
of the few published accounts of Abyssinia, its deserts, mountains and unbearable
heat.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs