Title: Library lantern
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00068
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: April 1935
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00068
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text
K'^--^y

SL

THE LIBRARY LA ERN

Published monthly from October to June by l /
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University ,
of New Hampshire ':-
Entered as econd-elsa matter October 10. 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire.
under the act of August 24, 1912
Vol. 10 APRIL, 1935 No. 7

A BIOGRAPHY OF TYPHUS
RATS, LICE AND HISTORY., by Hans Zinsser.
"Being a study in Biography, which . deals with the Life History of
Typhus Fever." The twelve chapters are full of amusing digressions, and the
story of typhus is more interesting and less repulsive than the title (evidently
someone's idea of a selling point) would lead one to believe. The author indulges
in a good bit of leg-pulling in his foot-notes which are not the kind that any reader
will want to skip. As out of place as it may seem in a book on this subject, Dr.
Zinsser allows himself to comment on the works of Gertrude Stein and T. S. Eliot,
implying that if their works are bought and read, he sees no reason why his should
not be also. The author -has spent many years in research and has covered the
subject of Typhus in a competent fashion.

30 DAYS IN RUSSIA
A VAGABOND IN SOVIETLAND, by Harry A. Franck.
At last America's first traveler has succumbed, with very good reasons, to
taking a supervised tour, and this time it is Russia and its associated soviet repub-
lics. Pressure of time did not allow him to stay in any one place very long, and,
therefore his decisions and impressions may not be altogether sound. Among
places he visited are Leningrad, Moscow, Rostov on Don, The Georgian Military
Highway (neither Georgian nor a highway), Erwan, and Kiev. He describes the
living and working conditions of both men and women, the places through which
he traveled, not third "class," but "hard" in that classless country, and he does try
to explain the varying value of the ruble.

THE LONG VIEW
PERSONAL HISTORY, by Vincent Shecan.
Into his first thirty-five years of life Vincent Sheean has crowded more adven-
tures than most people experience in twice that time. From the University of
Chicago he went to New York, Paris, and Madrid as a journalist, thence his curi-
osity led him to penetrate in disguise to the scene of war in the Rif, where his life
was more than once at the mercy of unscrupulous natives. After "convalescing"
from' each adventure he was led by a chance suggestion to some farther field, and
saw successively Persia, China, Russia, Jerusalem, supporting himself entirely by
writing under contracts obtained on flying visits to New York whenever his funds
were low. Throughout his adventures he strives to take "the long view," to see
events in their relation to world history and to relate his own life to the lives of
others. In Jerusalem he changed his mind about Zionism and promptly returned
to his backers the money advanced for articles which he could no longer sincerely
write. He is a most interesting man who knows interesting people; the story of
Sinclair Lewis improvising poetry will delight admirers of the novelist. The au-
thor's adventures are in the intellectual sphere as well as that of physical happen-
ings, and the account of them makes an absorbing book.

.0 W4
U. o. O. 1.








OUR GATEWAY
IN THE SHADOW OF LIBERTY, by Edward Corsi.
Few of us would consider Ellis Island as an exit from America, yet since 1932
more people have left our shores through that gateway than have entered it.
"Liberty" has seen vast changes in the tide of immigration which reached its peak
in 1907, the year Edward Corsi entered as an immigrant boy of ten, to the year
1932 when, as Commissioner of Ellis Island, his greatest problems centered around
the question of deportation. During his tenure as Commissioner Mr. Corsi, with
a sympathy augmented by his own experiences as an immigrant, did much to clear
Ellis Island of graft and exploitation. His book, while being autobiographical to
some extent, gives us a rather complete history of the Island and contains many
anecdotes both amusing and lamentable. There are stories of the Island's experi-
ences with the Countess Cathcart, Emma Goldman, "Prince Mike Romanoff," and
many others.

THE PLIGHT OF A SCIENTIST IN RUSSIA
I SPEAK FOR THE SILENT, by V. V. Chernavin.
This book would be difficult for the unprejudiced mind to accept were it not
that the author writes with intelligence and composure, and that his story has the
unmistakable ring of truth. Imprisoned for allegeded "wrecking" activities, he
was subjected to tortures imposed by PU officials to make him confess to crimes
he had never committed. Like himself, most of the prisoners were prominent
scientists and innocent of any subversive activities, but they were at the mercy of
a group of men who had obtained power and had become insane with sadistic
impulses. The account of the tortures to which the prisoners were subjected is
almost beyond belief. The author was fortunate in being treated somewhat less
rigorously than others. When finally sentenced to five years of forced labour he
matched his wits against those of his captors and by patience, luck, and careful
planning managed to escape with his wife and son to Finland. The Russian ex-
periment has many high aspirations, but the depths to which some of its protagon-
ists have sunk is evidence at least that not for many years will it be a model for the
world.
FIFTY YEARS OF MODERN ART
EXPRESSIONISM IN ART, by Sheldon Cheney.
In his second book on modern art Sheldon Cheney undertakes an analysis of
its characteristic elements. He is no longer on the defensive, but assumes on the
part of his readers an open-minded attitude toward a kind of art already widely
accepted. To describe this art another term than "Modernism" must obviously be
found, and the author explains why "Expressionism" is the most suitable one: the
modern artist expresses his own personality, and he also expresses the inner, mystic
quality of the objects he paints. "Expressionism is presentative where Realism is
representative; creative where Realism is imitative." In short Mr. Cheney thinks
pretty badly of realistic art from 'the Renaissance on; he considers it a digression
from the main current of primitive and oriental art of which modern art is the
logical heir. His book is an able contribution to the controversy.

FOLK TALES OF CAPE COD
THE NARROW LAND, by Elizabeth Reynard.
Fascinating tales and legends of Cape Cod as far back as the thirteenth century
when the Vikings sailed the seas. Pirates, witches, ghosts, and giants made this
spot their playground in the old days. Intriguing maps and several photographs
illustrate the book. It is regrettable that such a wealth of material wvas printed in
type so fine that many people will not care to strain their eyes reading it.







RECENT FICTION

COME AND GET IT, by Edna Ferber.
The first part of the story is a dynamic chronicle of the early years of the
lumber and paper industries in Wisconsin, and the rise of Barney Glasgow from
camp chore boy to lumber and pulp king. He marries the daughter of old Jed
Hewitt and inherits the Hewitt fortune along with a plain wife he never loves. He
has one son and a daughter and is genuinely liked by associates and employees.
Past fifty, he falls in love with the eighteen year old granddaughter of old Swan
Bostrom, his old lumberjack friend. (The character of old Swan is particularly
engaging). Lotta Lindbeck is very beautiful and in spite of a meager education
knows pretty well what she wants and how to get it. After the catastrophe on the
lake, Lotta marries Barney's son and the book loses its forcefulness while we follow
Lotta and Karie abroad, trying to show Butte des Mortes its mistake in ignoring
the beautiful Mrs. Bernard Glasgow. The twins are educated in select European
schools and Bernie joins his family frequently, but after the crash they have to
return to America.
ROAD OF AGES, by Robert Nathan.
A fantasy where-in all the Jews in the world, driven into exile, are marching
towards the only refuge open to them: the Cobi Desert. The columns stretch for
fifty miles in an endless confusion of cars, carriages, wagons, pushcarts, motor-
cycles, and pedestrians. Representing many nationalities and all walks of life,
these people are ejected from society solely because of their Jewish heritage. With
Mr. Nathan we join the line of march in Hungary and journey along until the
peaks of Tien Shan appear on the horizon. The microcosm with which we become
acquainted has its socialists warring with its communists, its capitalists plotting
exploitations in the new land, its poets, scientists, surgeons, musicians, and just
plain folks, facing the future with hope, fear, or resignation. David Weiss sums it
up when he says "We are taking our quarrels with us, as well as our hopes." The
tragic overtones of implication are relieved by Mr. Nathan's dry humor. Altho the
situation is highly improbable, the weaknesses of present day society are shown up
in an unflattering light.
THE LOADED STICK, by Naomi Jacob.
This is the story of a Yorkshire farm through three generations. Jasper Howe
married Jael 'Paris, the Gypsy girl, who later reverted to her former life in a cara-
van taking with her their young daughter, Paris. Jael learns that law and order
always triumphant and returns to the farm. Paris, who has an overwhelming love
of the soil, struggles with the farm until she makes a success of it. The best things
in the book are the portrayal of the three characters, Mary Ellen Howe, Jael and
Paris, the descriptions of the daily routine of the farm and the interesting bits of
ancient superstitions and folklore which are deftly added.
THE GREEN LIGHT, by Lloyd C. Douglas.
Those readers who liked Magnificent Obsession by the same author will look
forward to reading Green Light with pleasure. The author advances the philosophy
developed in the earlier work. The plot is simple. Dr. Newell Paige, a promising
young surgeon, takes the responsibility of a fatal mistake made by his idol, Dr.
Bruce Endicott, in the operating room and immediately flees from his associates
and hides his identity. Dean Harcourt, the principle character, and obviously the
author's mouthpiece, expounds the philosophy which holds that even though man's
progress through life is never serene and unimpeded, there cones a moment at
some point along the road when the light turns green and the way ahead lies clear.
The 1ook is a spiritual experience in which one does not often have the opportuni-
ty to indulge.







SPACE PERMITS
THE ELAGHIN AFFAIR, by lavn Bunin.
These fifteen short stories sustain Bunin's reputation as a master of this form.
Most of them were written in the 1920's, a few earlier. Concerned with the less
evident mental processes hidden in each individual, they present a variety of epi-
sodes and situations.
THE GREAT WALL CRUMBLES, by Grover Clark.
Written for the general reader who wishes to understand present day China,
this book, after a well pictured background, is concerned with contemporary China
and the breaking of barriers separating Eastern and Western civilizations.
THORSTEIN VEBLEN AND HIS AMERICA, by Joseph Dorfman.
A well documented biography and critical work on an eminent American
economist.
EARLY VICTORIAN ENGLAND, 1830-1865. 2 v.
"The object of the contributors to these volumes has been rather to provide
the background of ideas and habits, to recall the sights and sounds of Early Vic-
torian England, and so create for the reader of the history or literature of the time
the atmosphere which will bring their details into perspective or relief." Well il-
lustrated and written by specialists, these volumes deserve much more space than
we are giving.
HOW YOU CAN GET A JOB, by Glenn L. Gardiner.
The purpose of this book should be a practical one today. As defined by the
author, its intention is to suggest to the job seeker "in definite terms the procedure
he should follow and the tactics he should use in bringing his qualifications to the
attention of prospective employers and in selling his services convincingly."
A HISTORY OF NATIONAL SOCIALISM, by Konrad Heiden.
Despite faulty translation, this book is a valuable and carefully written account
of the national socialistic movement in Germany to the present.
BEFORE THE DAWN OF HISTORY, by Charles R. Knight.
Largely made up of illustrations giving panoramic views of prehistoric ani-
mals in their natural environment, with descriptions. An unusual book.
THE CHALLENGE OF LEISURE, by Arthur N. Pack.
With the ever increasing tendency to shorten hours of labor, greatly enhanced
during the past few years, comes the accompanying problem of the use of leisure
time. The author of this book sees it as a challenge to future planning, and discus-
ses it in a stimulating manner with relation to sports, hobbies, adult education, etc.
THE AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC GAME, by Drew Pearson and C. Brozrn.
A behind-the-scenes account of American diplomatic relations with foreign
powers since the World war. Written from a journalistic standpoint, but deserving
of a thorough reading.
WHO GETS THE MONEY?, by Walter Rautenstrauch.
In his analysis of our national income Professor Rautenstrauch divides our
industrial plant into two groups: producer, and overhead. He finds that today the
producer gets one-third the money spent, while the remainder goes to the overhead
group. Fifteen years ago both received the same. During these years there has
been a shift of from one-third to two-thirds of all those employed to the overhead
group.
THE LAST OF THE WIND SHIPS, by Alan J. Villers.
With the passing of the square-rigged sailing ship a great part of the romance
of commercial competition on the high seas is gone. The thrill of rounding the
Horn, as characterized by grain races of the past, is gone forever. More than 200
photographs here tell the story of the last voyage of the Parma.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs