Title: Library lantern
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00063
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1934
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00063
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN

Published monthly from r Jui'B.y the
Hamilton Smith Libjia the Unnersity
of Newit shire
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 12a th p qicoffi e at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the ae gu
Vol. Io NOVE 1934 No. 2

CHILDREN'S BOOK NUT IE-
A majority of the children's books referredto l.luw .il! be on display in the
CHILDREN'S ROOM! of the Library during CHILDREN'S BOOK WEEK,
November 11-17.
VANISHING WILDERNESS, by F. R. LaMonte and M. H. Welch.
A book in which we make the acquaintance of many of the animals of the
world, some of which are rapidly being killed off.
NAKED MOUNTAIN, by Elizabeth Knowlton.
Nanga Parbat-the Naked Mountain-in the Himalayas has yet to be conquered
by man. Miss Knowlton, newspaper correspondent for the Himalaya Expedition,
here records the recent attempt to reach the summit. Excellent photographic illus-
trations.
THE APPRENTICE OF FLORENCE, by Anne D. Kyle.
A stirring tale of the fifteenth century in Florence and Constantinople.
YOUNG MEXICO, by Anne M. Peck.
The author went to Mexico to study the manners and customs of the Mexicans
before writing this book, and it is the boys and girls of Mexico in whom she is
especially interested.
TABITHA OF LONELY HOUSE, by Hildegarde Hawthorne.
A story of old Concord with Louisa Alcott and other personalities taking im-
portant roles.
THE SCORING PLA Y, by Ralph Henry Barbour.
A new Barbour about school life and football.
THE COURAGEOUS HEART, by Bessie and Marquis James.
A splendid biography of the life of Andrew Jackson.
BATTLING THE ELEMENTS, by Bob Buck and Bob Ni.on.
An account of a thrilling airplane trip from New York to Mexico City.
CONSIGNED TO DAVY JONES, by George H. Grant.
Two boy-apprentices on a tramp steamer bound for Africa during the War
have plenty excitement to satisfy them.
A FRONTIER GIRL OF CHESAPEAKE BAY, by Alice Turner Curtis.
Jennifer Bradley found many interesting events to record in her diary back in
1660 in Maryland.
LUMBERJACK, by Stephen W. Meader.
A young lad works with a lumber crew in New Hampshire for a whole winter
to earn enough money for his college education.
THE SHIP WITHOUT A CREW, by Howard Pease.
A grand sea yarn based on the story of the Mary Celeste, and the famous
grampus Pelorus Jack.
AWAY GOES SALLY, by Elizabeth Coatsworth.
Sally travelled from Massachusetts to Maine in the winter, in a house on run-
ners pulled by stout oxen.
Oa.o

U.10. nto.a.








DOWN-ALONG APPLE MARKET STREET, by Mable Betsy Hill.
Like Little Red Riding Hood, Judy Jo carries a basket to her grandmother,
but Judy Jo's adventures are all happy ones.
LENDING MARY, by Eliza Orne White.
Mary does not expect a nice visit at Cousin Ruth's and so she has a surprise
in store.
PETER SWISS, by Helen. Coale Crew.
Heidi has her own place in our hearts, but here comes a little Swiss boy we
won't forget.
THE GOOD FRIENDS, by Margery Biancho.
Mary has her hands full when she undertakes to look after Mr. Hicks' animals.

PICTURE BOOKS
NICODEMUS AND THE LITTLE BLACK PIG, by Inez Hogan.
Here is our little pickaninny friend again. This time he has a little black pig to
play with and we meet the houn', too.
LITTLE GOOSIE GOSLING, by Helen and Alf Evers.
Naughty Goosie goes swimming in the goldfish bowl and plays the piano.
ABOUT A BEE, by Helen Torrey.
A busy bee and her friends go to the Fair and you'll be surprised to find out
what they buy.
LIONS'N' ELEPHANTS 'N' EVERYTHING, by E. Boyd Smith.
Mr. Smith tells the story of the Lewis family who go to Africa to get moving
pictures of animals.
CHICKEN WORLD, by E. Boyd Smith.
A new copy of this old favorite.
JIMMY THE GROCERYMAN, by Jane Miller.
Jimmy helps in his grandfather's store. A reader for nine-year olds.
GASTON AND JOSEPHINE IN AMERICA, by Georges Duplaix.
Two little French pigs come to America to visit their uncle in Arizona. They
get lost in New York, work at Childs', and make a picture in Hollywood before
they arrive at their destination.
LITTLE FAT GRETCHEN, by Emma Brock.
A fairy tale about a little girl who lives on top of a curious music box.
ROWENA, TEENA, TOT AND THE BLACKBERRIES, by Fannie B. Blum-
berg.
Three little black girls and their "grandmammy" go into the country for black-
berries. It would have been a better trip if Rowena had left the reins alone.
HUMPHREY, by Marjorie Flack.
A wise old turtle tells about the New England of the past century.

OTHER NEW BOOKS
PICTURE TALES FROM THE CHINESE, by Bertha Metzger.
BOY SCOUTS YEAR BOOK, 1934, edited by Franklin K. Mathiews.
MAPLE SUGAR TIME, by Royce S. Pitkin.
BIG BRIDGE, by Rupert Holland. A history of bridge-building.
HO-MING-GIRL OF NEW CHINA, by Elizabeth Foreman Lewis.
JAMES MACGREGOR, by Marion Bullard.
GYPSY LAD, by Capt. S. P. Meek.
A DAY ON SKATES, by Hilda van Stockum.
THE GOLDEN CAT, by Albert Bigelow Paine.
PAULO IN THE CHILEAN DESERT, by Margaret Loring Thomas.
MYSTERY OF PELICAN COVE, by Ruby Lorraine Radford.








BEATRICE THE BRAVE, by Rachel M. Varble.
STORIES OF THE SIOUX, by Chief Standing Bear.
THE SPANISH TWINS, by Lucy Perkins.


FOR THE ADULT

THE DIVISION OF A NATION
AMERICA'S TRAGEDY, by James Truslow Adams.
Three centuries ago America started from nothing to people and subdue an
entire continent. It is "one of the great stories of history," and during its course,
Mr. Adams believes there were two forces of prime importance-"that of the fron-
tier and that of sectionalism." It is the latter which he attempts to trace from the
beginning as it gradually cumulated and brought about the bitterness of the Civil
War. He tells the story of that bloody contest with due regard for its tragic quali-
ties, for both the South and the nation. Effective use is made of contemporary
newspapers, correspondence and diaries, and vivid biographical sketches of the
leaders of the period are woven in with Mr. Adams' usual skill of narrative. It is
an excellent and readable account of forces in American history which have still to
be considered in any clear-sighted view of the United States.

LIFE IN THE NINTIES
THE AGE OF CONFIDENCE, by Henry Seidel Canby.
"The last time in living memory when everyone knew exactly what it meant to
be an American"-viz., the ninties, an age calumniated today by smart people who
think the modern era began about 1910. Dr. Canby writes of the nineties with a
good deal of nostalgia, and indeed he paints an attractive picture of a lost age.
Though he is not blind to its faults he remembers its virtues, the loss of which he
deplores as a permanent misfortune of our culture. It was an age characterized by
confidence-in one's home, one's parents, in the mores. Culture was narrow, it
eschewed esthetics, but it flowered in the arts of home making and companionship.
The author discusses in turn childhood, home, parents, society, education, religion,
sex and marriage, what they read, nature, business and politics, as he remembers
the attitudes towards these matters in his home town of Wilmington, Delaware, in
the nineties.

PRESIDENTS REVEALED
FORTY-TWO YEARS IN THE WHITE HOUSE, by Irvin H. Hoover.
"Ike" Hoover entered the White House in the Harrison administration, and
remained there until his death a year ago. His job was to oil the wheels of the
household and keep the domestic machinery running smoothly, to take care of
guests, run the entertainments, and prompt anyone from the president down who
forgot or neglected his social duties: in short he was Chief Usher. Ten presidents
passed through the White House in his time, while he observed their habits and
eccentricities, their reactions to power, their treatment of guests and servants, their
friendships and their home life. There was not much he missed from his unique
vantage point of servant and confidant, and his story of the unofficial side of White
House life is most interesting. He reveals both the good and the bad points of the
presidents and their families, but with no motives either benign on the one hand or
malicious on the other-he simply relates facts as an impartial observer. Nor is
this mere gossip, though trivialities abound, for the author has a good deal of in-
sight, and the private life of a president may make more history than his public acts.








"WORTHIE CHAUCER GLORIOUS"
DAN CHAUCER, by Henry Dwight Sedgwick.
Chaucer has been so weighted down with the commentaries of learned profes-
sors that he is often regarded as hopeless for the ordinary reader. Mr. Sedgwick
has written a book to refute this and to show how much of Chaucer may be readily
enjoyed. He tells of Chaucer's life, his reading and studies, his business in the
employ of the State. his foreign travels, his friends, and something about the pub-
lic affairs of the period. But it is Chaucer, the poet and great teller of tales, upon
whom he dwells. "Chaucer has a brilliant wit, good sense, a delightful many-hued
irony, a power of showing us a beauty in familiar things, an unsurpassed skill in
drawing characters of comedy in clear, definite, realistic exactitude, a tender sense
of pathos, an ability to suffuse his pictures with the light of rising suns, and he
possesses a mastery of the craft of verse."
MAINE VILLAGERS
MARY PETERS, by Mary Ellen Chase.
A quiet, delicate story of M'aine and its twofold tradition of sea and farm.
Mary Peters spends the first years of her life wandering about the world on her
father's ship-a childhood that left many wonderful memories and instilled in her
the wisdom of endurance and steadfastness. Her return to Petersport, a typical
Maine village in the eighties and nineties, gives Miss Chase an opportunity
to portray the characters and manner of living she knows so well. And as a back-
ground, the sea and fields and changing seasons are painted in most beautiful detail,
giving one a lovely picture of that section of Maine. Mary Peters' life with its
romance and quiet tragedies seems an integral part of this setting.

OUR OWN TIMES
THESE HURRYING YEARS, by Gerald Heard.
This is a history of the twentieth century down to 1933, in which the author
seeks to discover the hidden trends and unseen forces behind the outward events of
these revolutionary times. In thirty-three years we have lived through more time,
measured in terms of events, than Gibbon treated in his "Decline and Fall,"
yet these events, he believes, are not the cause of our present chaos, but simply
the outward manifestations of fundamental changes taking place in the mind of the
human race. To support his thesis he covers every p-ha:e of human activity from
labor movements to nitrogen fixation and Surrealism, and the book is both an en-
tertaining and a penetrating study of our times.

ANOTHER LOCKHART PRISM
RETREAT FROM GLORY, by Bruce Lockhart.
Bruce Lockhart, of The British Agent, gives to his reading public the story of
his life following his Russian adventures. It is an entertaining story of conditions
in Central European countries after the World War. Lockhart, who no longer
walks with death, as he did in Russia, is a good illustration of the restlessness of
his post-war generation. He enters the diplomatic service as an under-secretary
in the English embassy at 'Prague where he lives a colorful social life, if not a high-
ly successful diplomatic one. He becomes financially involved to the tune of
1o,ooo and in order to pay his creditors, he changes his profession and travels
down Threadneedle Street. The Bank makes an unsuccessful attempt to regener-
ate the Central European banking system, and, at first Lockhart enjoys his part in
the negotiations. Later, as the scheme falls through, he becomes dissatisfied with
his life as a minor official in the bank and, as a result, enters journalism. In twenty
years this man has changed his profession five times, learned to "extract the full
flavor of an experience" and to pass it on to others without the flavor diminishing
a jot.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs