Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00062
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: October 1934
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00062
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LANTER

Published monthly from October to June by te
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University..
of New Hampshire \
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New iEampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912
Vol. o1 OCTOBER, 1934 No. I

THE THREE ENGLANDS
ENGLISH JOURNEY, by J. B. Priestley.
Tourists who spend five days in London and a week-end in the Cathedral
towns and imagine they have seen England, will find many surprises in this book.
Mr. Priestley begins his journey at Southampton. He goes to Bristol, drives thru
the lovely Cotswolds, visits the great factory cities and towns, and the mining sec-
tions. This is the England of The Good Companions and Angel Pavement, We
even meet Jess Oakroyd in the original. The making of chocolates, cars and type-
writers is no longer a secret, for Mr. Priestley sees the processes through which
each must go before completion. We have a naive description of the author in the
Potteries, fascinated by the potter's wheel and fondly hoping to "throw" a beauti-
ful vase. Durham and its cathedral are world-famous, but few people have ever
heard of East Durham and the neighboring collieries, which the author visits.
The final chapter sums up the three Englands of the journey: Old England,
Victorian England, and Post-war England, with special emphasis on the problems
which Post-war England presents to the thinking people of the nation.

OUR NATIVE LAND
AMERICAN SONG, by Paul Engle.
The author of this book of poems is a young Rhoades scholar now at Oxford.
The critics have received his volume with praise and predict that he will play an
important part in this decade of our literary history. The poems are not patriotic
in the ordinary sense of the word, but thru them all runs a deep pride and strong
faith in this great country of ours. The closing poem, America Remembers, was
awarded Poetry's prize for the best poem about the Century of Progress Exposi-
tion. In it we find the very essence of the American spirit as it has grown and
developed thru the years.

GENTEEL AND HUMOROUS
GOOD-BYE, MR. CHIPS, by James Hilton.
Mr. Chipping has been at Brookfield, an English public school, for sixty years.
He was master of classics until he retired to the little cottage across the street,
whence he strolls over on fine afternoons to watch the boys at cricket, and invites
all the new ones to tea. Brookfield has been his life, and now, "getting on in years"
(but not ill of course) he sits by the fire with his cup of tea, dreaming of school
days and the procession of boys, generation after generation, whom he taught,
punished, and joked with. He was "Chips" to them all, and if he sometimes said
queer things they told each other that it was "just like Old Chips," and on they
went to become baronets and send their sons to Brookfield, and their sons' sons
followed them and they went on to the battlefields of France. Chips remembers
them all, they are his sons, and they come marching out of the past, in rhythmic
procession, to bear him company into the sunset. This story of Chips is "a com-
pletely charming, movingly tender and heartwarming chronicle."

J Zoo.







THE JAMES FAMILY
JOURNAL OF ALICE JAMES, edited by Anna Robeson Burr.
Allusions to Alice, in the Letters of William and Henry James have always
made one long to know more of her. This Journal is eloquent proof of the indepen-
dent and sensitive woman her brothers loved. Fighting ill health from her sixteenth
birthday, Alice's life was an intense inward one and her Journal covering the last
four years of her life, shows the vitality of her mind and almost heroic character,
combined with a rich irony and humour. She hated sham and dullness and many
of her most amusing passages are caustic comments on the phlegmatic English
among whom she spent her last years. Alice also had a gift of expression, so pre-
dominant in her brothers, which makes her style a delight.
An introduction by Anna Robeson Burr gives a short history of the James
family, including the younger brothers, as a background for one's picture of Alice.

A DIFFERENT IMPRESSION
BEYOND THE MEXIQUE BAY, by Aldous Huxley.
Sceptic, philosopher, and dry humorist, Aldous Huxley finds in Central Am-
erica and Mexico City little of the high color and simplicity so admired by D. H.
Lawrence and Stuart Chase. Huxley's rather disjointed impressions are vividly
realistic of the present state of culture and life of the natives of these countries.
Constant comparisons and reflections lead him to the conclusion that we can well
be thankful for as much civilization as we have, disagreeable and contradictory as
it often is. Discussions of Mayan civilization, the accidents of genius, war and the
psychology of the mob, time and religion, descriptions of places and people furnish
a varied intellectual entertainment.

ART AND PROPAGANDA IN RUSSIA
ARTISTS IN UNIFORM, by Max Eastman.
An honest review of literature under Stalinism in Russia by an American
communist. To his own regret. Mr. Eastman concludes that "every manifestation
of strong and genuine creative volition, every upthrust of artistic manhood in the
Soviet Union, has been silenced, or banished, or stamped out, or whipped into line
among the conscripted propaganda writers in the service of the political machine."
Yessenin and Maiakovsky committed suicide, Voronsky and Isaac Babyel are si-
lenced, Boris Pilnyak writes to order and all spontaneous, gifted expression is
crushed down to fit into one scheme of thought. Mr. Eastman concludes with a
translation of Polonsky's essay on "Lenin's Views of Art and Culture," which
shows the way to a liberated love of the arts in a proletarian society, free from a
dogmatic idea of what they should be.

PRIZE NOVEL
DUSK AT THE GROVE, by Samuel Rogers.
One of the largest annual awards is the Atlantic Monthly $o1,ooo Prize. Books
receiving these huge awards are always highly advertised with publisher's ballyhoo
but are seldom received very enthusiastically by the critics. This year's award,
written by a young professor, is being received rather warmly however, and comes
as near deserving the award as have any in past years, though it cannot be called a
really great novel. It is a quietly moving, charmingly written, story of a modern
American family, centered at its summer place on the Rhode Island coast. The
story is interesting enough in a quiet way, but the book's chief value lies in its
skillful combination of individual inner reaction with outward action to make both
entirely homogeneous.







DRAMATIZING THE CASUAL
THE SECOND HOUSE FROM THE CORNER, by Max Miller.
The author of I Cover the Waterfront has at last found a "shelf" in life, the
first house which he has owned, and from this vantage point he covers the neigh-
borhood in a series of subtly amusing sketches. He has written skillfully of the
idiosyncracies peculiar to the type of neighbors who may be found everywhere in
small communities. His little adventures are told in the same quiet, impersonal
manner. The most unusual thing about the whole book is that he has an operation
and comments on the spiritual reactions rather than the physical-to do that takes
a great amount of self control.

THE PAST LIVES AGAIN
IN THE DARK BACKWARD, by Alan Nevinson.
In the above book Mr. Nevinson carries us back to the past splendors of his-
tory and through his vivid imagination makes live for us again such occurences as
the battle of Troy, the battle of Agincourt, and many other famous historical
events. The chapter headings perhaps best describe the rich contents of this book.
Here are a few examples:
"A HAPPY WARRIOR": How, in coasting along the Black Sea, I saw
Xenophon with Ten Thousand reach Trebizond.
"NOT WITHOUT HONOUR": How, walking in Aldersgate, I met Milton
and accompanied him to his home.
"KING OF ALL HIELAND HAIRTS": How, being at my ancestral home
in Westmorland, I saw Prince Charlie and his Highlanders advance and retreat.

ELBA TO ST. HELENA
THE HUNDRED DAYS, by Philip Guedalla.
When Napoleon escaped from Elba no one knew that only a "Hundred Days"
had begun, and the time was exciting and uncertain. Guedalla has captured its
spirit by writing as an eye witness of those stirring days,-Napoleon's landing in
France and regaining the support of his capricious people; his return to the Tuil-
eries, where the ladies of the court knelt in all their finery to pull the fleurs-de-lys
off the carpet. Then the period of uncertainty as Napoleon tried to consolidate
his position at home and to placate the foreign powers, and finally the battle of
Waterloo. The accepted version of the latter event is not quite satisfactory to the
author of this volume, who finds historians somewhat gullible towards Napoleon's
own account of the affair. Here Wellington gets full credit for the skill which won
the victory.

CONVERTING THE BASQUES
GOING ABROAD, by Rose Macaulay.
A master of satire turns her critical eye on the Oxford Groups or Buchman-
ites, and makes a diverting tale at their expense. The scene is laid on the Basque
coast, where a group is at work trying to "change" the natives and such English
travellers as happen to be patronising the resorts. The field is indeed ripe, what
with the English girl who is afraid of death, the beauty specialists who confess
privately that they do more harm than good, and the Basque smugglers who con-
sider it bad form of the Groupers to mention smuggling in public. MissMacaulay
has portrayed, as usual, a number of picturesque and amusing characters, and one
highly improbable event, which all go to make up one of her best books.








ANOTHER UTOPIA?
THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME, by Walter B. Pitkin.
Now is the time for all youth, some fifteen million according to the Professor,
to arise and take over the political, social and economic destiny of America, "Its
aims, not to reach Utopia over night, but to detour around hell." It is now or
never-another year or two of neglect will cause American culture to dissolve
forever and ave. Professor Pitkin rushes into print with little provocation. A new
book of his seems destined from the first stroke to be superficial and a national best
seller, master showman that he is! The present volume, following quickly upon
the heels of his New Careers for Youth, is concerned with a Plan for Youth,
nowhere very definite, in which he issues marching orders for this vast army of
youth to decentralize present obsolescent modes of life, to go forth as modern
pioneers to rebuild the present cities of wilderness, and to build myriads of new
towns and villages based upon some type of indefinite communal life. Shades of
Lenin and Hitler!

OTHER NEW BOOKS OF THE SUMMER
A SOLDIER IN SCIENCE, by Bailey K. Ashford.
PRIVATE WORLDS, by Phyllis Bottome.
STARS FELL ON ALABAMA, by Carl L. Carmer.
SCIENCE FOR A NEW WORLD, ed. by J. G. Crowther.
SUN ON THEIR SHOULDERS, by Elizabeth Eastman.
EXPLORATION OF WESTERN AMERICA, by E. W. Gilbert.
REBEL DESTINY,, by M. J. and F. S. Herskovits.
THE WAYS OF THE WHITE FOLKS, by Langston Hughes.
YEARS ARE SO LONG, by Josephine Lawrence.
BOY AND GIRL TRAMPS OF AMERICA, by Thomas Minehan.
CURZON: THE LAST PHASE, by Harold Nicholson.
NEW CAREERS FOR YOUTH, by Walter B. Pitkin.
STRONG MAN RULES, by George N. Shuster.
ATTENDING MARVELS, by George G. Simpson.
THE COMING AMERICAN REVOLUTION, by George H. Soule.
MEN, FISH AND BOATS, by Alfred B. Stanford.
UNFINISHED SYMPHONY, by T. S. Stribling.
THE REBEL RAIDER, by Howard Swiggett.
MODERN AMERICAN PROSE, ed. by Carl Van Doren.
SO RED THE ROSE, by Stark Young.

LITERARY FORGERIES
ENQUIRY INTO THE NATURE OF CERTAIN NINETEENTH CEN-
TURY PAMPHLETS, by John Carter and Graham Pollard.
Ordinarily books of this type are not read with much enthusiasm by the lay
public, but we believe this should prove the exception. It is a fully documented
exposure of some fifty 'first editions' of such literary lights as, Dickens, Thackery,
Tennyson, Wordsworth, Kipling, etc. These items which have been accepted as
authentic first editions by scholars and -collectors, including the eminent bibli-
ographer, Mr. Wise, are proven here, without a shadow of doubt, to be very clever
forgeries. The book, which is as exciting as a first-rate detective story, has liter-
ally thrown a bombshell into the collecting game.




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