Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00061
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: June 1934
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00061
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LANTERN

Published monthly from October to June by the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912 -:
Vol. 9 JUNE, 1934 t. ,.

ART NUMBER -.
A selection from books on the fine arts published since ~i o.
MODERN ARCHITECTURE.
THE DISAPPEARING CITY.
by Frank Lloyd Wright.
In these two books we have a discussion of the ideas which ariimiat the getiius
of Frank Lloyd Wright, an American prophet more honoured in Europe than in
his own country, but one whose power will eventually be recognized at home.
Abandoning completely the architecture of the past, he declares that "any building
for humane purposes should be an elemental, sympathetic feature of the ground,
complementary to its nature-environment, belonging by kinship to the terrain."
He wants a house to be not a box shutting off the natural environment, but a
protected part of that environment, in which the occupants may enjoy the sun-
shine and freedom of the outdoors with protection from cold and storms. "The!
home would be an indoor garden, the garden an outdoor house." Modern ma-
terials, steel and glass, and modern construction made possible by the machine,
are the productive forces behind this new type of house. He glorifies the machine
as the servant of men; its products have a beauty of their own and need not be
standardized. Individuality can have full play in the modern home. Likewise he
scorns imitation and disguise; decoration laid on superficially is not an organic
part of the building or object to which it is applied, and violates the principles
of art. At the same time he rejects the so-called modernistic house which looks
as if it had been cut out of cardboard with a pair of scissors. But his books are
*not destructive, as a reading of them will show, and the reproductions of some
of his own designs show the quality of his art.
In "The Disappearing City" he envisages the new order of social and econom-
ic life possible if man would abandon the city and scatter over the country. Each
family could have an acre of land, factories would be small and easily accessible
to the workers from their garden homes. Centres of recreation, art, and education
would be within the reach of all. Man would be liberated by the proper use of the
mechanical resources now available.
CONFESSIONS OF A KEEPER, by D. S. MacColl.
The former keeper of the Tate Gallery in London publishes "a first selection
from forty years' work of criticism." He writes clearly and with penetration on
artists and schools of art, and on the theories and questions which tease the mind
of everyone who thinks about art.
BEAUTY LOOKS AFTER HERSELF, by Eric Gill.
Essays by the famous sculptor and illustrator, on beauty and art and its place
in the life of men. His philosophy might be summed up as "Look after goodness
and truth, and beauty will take care of itself."

494q,








GEORGIAN ENGLAND, by A. E. Richardson.
All phases of social life, trades, industries and arts are touched upon, and
the hook is profusely illustrated. Feeling that there is already much information
available about the architecture and fine arts of the period, the author has dealt
at greater length with the decorative and building crafts. He also includes a chap-
ter on sport ,which was an important adjunct to the life of the times. Hunting
and racing were the major sports but tennis, golf, cricket, football and other
games were played, while the more 'barbarous sports of cock-fighting and bull
running had a large following among the poorer classes. In the latter half of the
century, women entered the sporting lists and called forth much ridicule from
the opposite sex. The 'book is entertainingly written and gives a comprehensive
picture of English life from. 1700 to 1820.
THE PAINT BOX, by Martin Armstrong.
The author explains in simple language what pictures are, and briefly outlines
the history of European painting from Giotto to Picasso. He points out the
difference in technique employed by the various schools: the Florentines devoted
to the portrayal of the human form, the Venetians who were colorists, the Dutch
artists daring to paint things and people from everyday life, finally landscape
painters and then the advent of Impressionists. The ten illustrations were chosen
to show the development in pictorial art.

WILLIAM BLAKE, by Philippe Soupault.
A sympathetic interpretation of Blake the 'mystic, poet and artist. At a very
early age he began to see visions and later his visionary friends were as real to
him as were the people ,with whom he came in daily contact. Blake was undoubt-
edly eccentric, but he was also a genius. In his painting as well as in his poetry
he sought to express the things of the mind, ignoring accuracy of detail and con-
centrating his powers on the design, coloring and imaginative content. He has
never had a large following, but the people who admire his work do so unreserv-
edly. Reproductions are included in the latter half of the book.
COROT, by Marc Lafargue.
Corot's life was as different from Blake's as are his paintings. Money was
always forthcoming and he was of a cheerful, optimistic disposition. He loved
nature passionately and chose to paint it exactly as it appeared to him. He visited
Italy three times and felt its spell as so many artists had done before him. He
belonged to the Barbizon school and left many canvases of this period in his life.
Altho his fame rests largely upon this landscape paintings, Corot was also a figure
painter of merit. He once said, "My aim is to express life: I must have a model
who moves." His landscapes also express life-life which he loved but relinquished
happily when his end came in 1875. Forty reproductions of his paintings are
found in the second half of the book.
PURPOSE AND ADMIRATION, a lay study of the visual arts, by I. E. Barton.
The development of art is closely tied up with the social history of the ages.
Architecture was the first conscious art, then came sculpture, painting, and finally
the makers of furniture, who drew upon architecture for their principles of pro-
portion and ornament. This book is an excellent guide to the realization of art as
individual experience.
A GRAMMAR OF THE ARTS, by Sir Charles Holmes.
The fundamentals of art, technique of the various branches, the limitations
and potentialities of each, and the underlying principles of all art.







REMBRANDT, by Arthur M. Hind.
As Keeper of Prints in the British Museum, MTr. Hind has long made a study
of Rembrandt's etchings and drawings and in these essays he correlates both the
etchings and paintings to show the development of Rembrandt's genius. That
genius was preeminently one of "expression," mainly of human emotion, and "his
whole life is a story of an intellectual progress and expansion" in his art. The
plates by which Mr. Hind illustrates his points are excellent and include many
etchings not usually reproduced.
EL GRECO, by Frank Rutter.
Since El Greco's rediscovery by Cezanne, he has been the subject of numer-
ous studies. Mr. Rutter's, based upon the monumental ,work of Cossio, gives the
few known details of El Greco's life and an extensive analysis of the characteristics
of his art. By numerous plates and verbal descriptions Mr. Rutter provides the
reader with a most vivid impression of El Greco's paintings. There is a quivering
vitality about the work of El Greco, as well as great technical excellence,which
places him among the greatest of the world's artists.
PRINCIPALS OF ART HISTORY, by HeinTrich Wolfflin.
A brilliant volume in art history, which attempts to discover the conditions--
call it temperament, zeitgeist or racial character-which determine the style of
individuals, periods and peoples. The historian has to reckon with stages of the
imagination and in this book, Dr. Wolfflin traces in detail the changes from the
sixteenth to the seventeenth century of the visions of painters, architects, and
sculptors.
EXPERIENCING PICTURES, by Ralph M. Pearson.
A stimulating analysis of the elements which make up a picture. At frequent
intervals in the discussion the author suggests that you take a pencil, or coloured
crayons, and find out for yourself the relationships between lines and colours. To
the writer, who is also an artist (as some writers on art are unfortunately not)
the greatest rediscovery of modern painting is adventure, and he gives us adven-
ture here.
GILBERT STUART, by William Whitley.
America's most famous early portrait painter is excellently pictured in his
historical setting and among his distinguished contemporaries both in England
and America. Through a diligent search of old newspapers, magazines, memoirs
and exhibition catalogs, Mr. Whitley has added valuable and interesting new
material.
PORTRAIT OF AMERICA, by Diego Rivera.
Black and wVhite reproductions of Rivera's most celebrated murals in the
United States, with explanatory text by Bertram Wolfe. The much discussed
Rockefeller Center mural reproduced.
READINGS IN ART APPRECIATION, edited by Alfred Mansfield Brooks.
The contents of this book are indicated by its subtitle: Great Artists and their
Work, by Great Authors. There are short selections from many of the world's
literary classics, including Homer, Plutarch, and the Bible among the ancients, and
a wide range of moderns: Ruskin, Pater, Viollet-Le-Duc, Rodin, Goethe, Whistler,
and many others. Also passages from fiction: Thackeray, Hugo, Galsworthy,
Hawthorne; and a few poets: Longfellow, Browning. The selections are grouped
in four sections, viz.: The purpose and meaning of art, Architecture, Painting, and
Sculpture. Here in a compact form will be found many interesting views of art,
and descriptions of famous paintings, buildings, and sculpture.







ART, LIFE, AND NATURE IN JAPAN, by Masaharu Anesaki.
In the Occident we go to museums for our art; in Japan art is in every home.
Perhaps that is why Japanese paintings, buildings, and gardens are so attractive
to western eyes:-they are made to be lived with, not to be gazed at on Sunday
afternoons. The Japanese live close to nature and derive from her their inspiration.
A Japanese temple is built to harmonize 'with its surroundings, while a Gothic
cathedral is a triumph over nature. The Japanese garden is an outdoor continua-
tion of the house, and this harmony between buildings and their surroundings is
what Frank Lloyd Wright (reviewed elsewhere in this issue) is trying to bring
to America.
Six lectures are reprinted in this book. The first two deal with the Japanese
spirit, the remaining ones trace the history of art among the various classes of
people down to the present time.
THE VICTORIAN MORALITY OF ART, by Henry Ladd.
An attempt to show the importance of Ruskin's morality of art in the twentieth
century.

PULITZER PRIZE AWARDS 1933-34
Biography: JOHN HAY, by Tyler Dennett.
Drama: MEN IN WHITE, by Sidney Kingsley.
Fiction: LAMB IN HIS BOSOM, by Caroline Miller.
History: THE PEOPLE'S CHOICE, by Herbert Agar.
Poetry: COLLECTED VERSE, by Robert Hillyer.

OTHER NEW BOOKS
AMONG THE LOST PEOPLE, by Conrad Aiken.
HOW ODD OF GOD, by Levis Browne.
THE ECONOMY OF ABUNDANCE, by Stuart Chase.
DESIGNED FOR READING; an. anthology from the Saturday Review of
Literature.
SEVEN GOTHIC TALES, by Isak Dinesen.
A GOLDEN HIGHWAY, by Carl B. Glasscock.
THE QUEEN AND MR. GLADSTONE, by Philip Guedalla.
THE HILLS ARE READY FOR CLIMBING; a collection of poems by under-
graduates of American colleges and universities.
MEMORIES OF MY CHILDHOOD, by Sclma Lagerlof.
COLONEL LAWERENCE, THE MAN BEHLVD THE LEGEND, by Liddell
Hart.
TECHNICS AND CIVILIZATION, by Lewis Mumford.
GUIDE TO CIVILIZED LOAFING, by Harry A. Overstreet.
ON OUR WAY, by Franklin D. Roosevelt.
TREATISE ON RIGHT AND WRONG, by H. L. Mencken.
THE NINE TAILORS, by Dorothy Sayers.
SAINTS, SINNERS AND BEECHERS, by Lyman Beecher Stowe.
I WAS A GERMAN, by Ernst Toller.
FIREWEED, by Mildred Walker.

AN EXHIBITION
An interesting exhibit of photographs of the First Annual National Collegiate
Photographic Salon, collected by the University of Wisconsin Camera Club, will be
held at the library June 9 to 13.




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