Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00054
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1933
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00054
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY I.

Published monthly from October to ne b the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the yi rsti 0
of New Hampshire j
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post offi ~a rham, New Hamp ,e
under the act of August 24, 4912
Vol. 9 NOVEMBER, 193 2

CHILDREN'S BOOK NUMBER
Children's books reviewed on the following pages will be on display
in the Children's Room of the Library during CHILDREN'S BOOK
WEEK, NOVEMBER 12-18. Postals may be had at the main desk for
any books you may wish to reserve.
DARK CIRCLE OF BRANCHES, by- Laura Adams Armer.
Again Mrs. Armer brings us the beauty and mysticism which is so
vital a part of the life of Indian tribes. Na Nai, the little crippled Navaho,
learns from his uncle the meaning of the Mountain Chant. He goes with
his people into exile in New Mexico, and there makes friends with two
Mexican boys. After four long years the Indians return to their homes
in the Canyou de Chelly.
THE BIG TREE OF BUNLAHY, by Padraic Colum
In the tiny village of Bunlahy stands a great elm-tree. Under its
branches Mr. Colum heard the Irish folk and fairy tales which he relates
in this book. We learn how the first harp was made, about the Lupra-
chauns (wee men) arriving in Ireland, and about many other interesting
tales. Illustrated by Jack Yeats.
A SPY OF '76, by Albertus T. Dudley.
Older boys will enjoy this stirring tale of two young lads during
the years 1776 and 1777. Much of the action takes place in New Hamp-
shire. The spy, Enoch Crosby, is the Harvey Birch of Cooper's The Spy.
MR. M'TAVISH, by Marion Bullard.
This is a true story with many pictures, of a winsome Scotty and
his two young owners, Thomas and Mary. Can anyone resist a puppy
who stands in the corner to punish himself for disobeying?
PETER: KATRINKA'S BROTHER, by Helen Eggleston Haskell.
The popular Katrinka returns with her brother and some of their old
friends. Katrinka is now in love with a young Russian, and Peter is
quite fascinated by "Amerikanska." For older boys and girls.
THE SHADY HILL PLAY BOOK, by Katharine Taylor and Henry Greene.
Eight excellent plays used by the Shady Hill School of Cambridge,
Mass. Selected for their English and historical value and including a
French version of four of the plays, they are suitable for production in
any school. Stage directions are given.
PICTURE TALES FROM THE FRENCH, by Simone Chamoud.
Generations of French children have listened to these quaint tales.
Now they have been translated by Simone Chamoud and amusingly il-
lustrated by Grace Gilkison.


u. R. nc. 2.







MISS PERT'S CHRISTMAS TREE, by J. Paget-Fredericks.
A Christmas fantasy about a little girl living in a great English
country house and who loved the Christmas trees. The unusual illustra-
tions are the work of the author.
TRACKS AND TRAILS, by Leonard Rossell.
This small book contains a fund of information about "wild folk."
In addition Clinton Abbot contributes an article on photographing animals
and birds, and Lawrence Palmer gives directions for making track casts.
It is an Official Boy Scout publication.
STORY LAND TREE, by Maud Lindsay.
New stories and merry rhymes for young children, with pictures by
Kayren Draper and Mimi Hill.
PRAIRIE ANCHORAGE, by Marjorie Medary.
A Nova Scotia family migrates to Ohio in the fifties. A fire at sea,
a steamboat race on the Mississippi, and escapes from Indians and wolves
are some of the exciting events which occur before the family makes its
new home.
RHYMES OF OLD TIMES, Illustrated by Margaret Tarrant.
Favorite rhymes from Mother Goose and other sources, liberally il-
lustrated, including many plates.
WAG-TAIL BESS, by Marjorie Flack.
Remember Angus and the Ducks? Wag-Tail Bess is the dog-next-
door who chases ducks with Angus.
NICODEMUS AND THE HOUN' DOG, by Inez Hogan.
Nicodemus is a cute little pickaninny. It begins to look as if Mammy
isn't going to let Nicodemus keep the houn' dog until "li'l sistah" falls
into the pond.
BARRIE'S PETER PAN IN KENSINGTON GARDENS.
The story is retold by May Byron with Barrie's permission so that
little folks may enjoy it, and illustrated by Arthur Rackham.
FRANCONIA STORIES, by Jacob Abbott.
The scene of this book is laid in the White Mountains. The stories
are condensed, but just as enjoyable as ever.
A CHILD'S STORY OF CIVILIZATION, by Stephen King-Hall.
This author has made of history a vital, living thing. Children who
find history a bore will see it from quite a different angle after reading
this book. Suggestions to parents and teachers are included.
PUFFIN, PUMA & CO., by F. Gwynne Evans.
Do you know what a puffin is ? Or a puma? There are other strange
creatures in these verses, and knights, small boys and even a policeman.
Amusing pictures on every page.
DOCTOR DOLITTLE'S RETURN, by Hugh Lofting.
At last Dr. Dolittle returns from the moon. He has grown so tall
and stout that he has to live in a circus tent for a time. Such wonderful
tales he has to tell of his adventures on the moon!
MORE ABOUT ME, by John Drinkwater.
A companion volume to All About Me-poems of everyday which
appeal to children.







LONE RIDER, by Hildegarde Hawthorne.
Ben Reynolds becomes a Lone Rider for Kit Carson and goes on
dangerous missions. Later Ben joins the Pony Express, then acts as
scout for Carson. And, of course, there is a girl in the story. The author
is a granddaughter of Nathaniel Hawthorne.
CAREERS AHEAD, by Joseph Cottler and Harold Brecht.
Over sixty occupations are presented in interesting fashion to show
the boy on girl choosing a vocation what is expected of a beginner in
these fields and the possibilities of advancement.
THE CREW OF THE "CASCO," by Ralph Henry Barbour.
Barbour's books need no introduction. The scene of this one is the
Maine coast.
BROOMSTICK AND SNOWFLAKE, by Johan Falberget.
A charming Norwegian story with trolls, giants and gnomes. If
you think Broomstick is something belonging to a witch you are going
to have a surprise.
SLEEPY STEVE, by Josef Berger.
Bib and Bettie are very disappointed at not being able to join the
circus, but Sleepy Steve, the clown, shows them how to have a circus
of their own at home.
A CHILD'S HISTORY OF ART, by V. M. Hillyer and E. G. Huey.
This is a companion volume to A Child's History of the World, and
A Child's Geography of the World. The Book is divided into three parts:
Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture, and contains almost two hundred
illustrations. Well adapted to aid the child in early efforts to grasp the
fundamentals of art. The Junior Literary Guild selection for October.
THE HURDY-GURDY MAN, byq Margery Williams Bianco.
All children love the hurdy-gurdy man with his monkey, and this one
is going to be a great favorite with the smaller children. Pictures by
Robert Lawson.

THE JOHN NEWBERRY MEDAL
As we go to press announcement comes from the American Library
Association that the Newberry Medal for 1932 goes to Elizabeth Fore-
man Lewis for her Young Fu of the Upper Yantze. The award is bestowed
annually on a citizen of the United States by a committee of the A. L. A.
for "an original and creative piece of work, the most distinguished con-
tribution to American literature for children, original in conception, fine
in workmanship and artistically true." This book will also be on display
during BOOK WEEK. Following is a list of former titles which have
received the award.
1921 The Story of Mankind, by Hendrick Van Loon.
1922 The Voyage of Dr. Dolittle, by Hugh Lofting.
1923 The Dark Frigate, by Charles Boardman Hawes.
1924 Tales from Silver Lands, by Charles J. Finger.
1925 Shen of the Sea, by Arthur Bowie Chrisman.
1926 Smoky: the Cowboy, by Will James.
1927 Gay-Neck, by Dhan Gopal Mukerji.
1928 Trumpeter of Krakow, by Eric P. Kelley.
1929 Hitty, Her First Hundred Years, by Rachel Field.
1930 The Cat Who Went to Heaven, by Elizabeth Coatsworth.
1931 Waterless Mountain, by Laura Adams Armer.








A VIGOROUS PERSONALITY
THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ALICE B. TOKLAS.
Thinly disguised as her own secretary, Gertrude Stein writes her
autobiography in really lucid prose. Although it is mainly about Gertrude
Stein it contains much beside that is interesting: about her friends in
Paris, particularly Picasso and other painters, and about various artistic
and literary movements of the time. In spite of the eccentricities of her
literary style (largely mitigated in this book) the author reveals herself
as a very human person, fond of cooking and knitting and driving a car,
and above all interested in people and in words. It is for words, of
course, that she is famous, and if one would explore her works this book
is an excellent starting point. Here she is as simple as a school-child yet
her long loosely-knit sentences show how effective simplicity can be.
NO SECOND SPRING, by Janet Beith.
In a tiny village far up on the west coast of Scotland, a young minister
and his wife meet with more of tragedy than happiness. He has a stern
religious code which neither joy nor sorrow can affect, but which cannot
assuage the aching heart of his wife when everything she loves is taken
from her. A sympathetic and well-written tale. Advertized as a $20,000.
prize novel.
NAZI GERMANY
GERMANY ENTERS THE THIRD REICH, by Calvin B. Hoover.
Germany is engaging the apprehension of the whole world today,
yet it is difficult to find out exactly what is going on there. For this
reason a book written from first hand observation and completed only
three months ago is particularly welcome. The author does not set out
to prove or disprove anything about the Nazis, but only to recount the
facts of their rise to power. The economic misery of the people and the
impotence of the Social Democrats in coping with it were what brought
vast numbers of adherents to the Nazi party, and so emotionalized have
they become that their "abnormal" actions can only be considered normal,
and probably permanent. Hitler is not, as is often thought, responsible
for the trend of affairs in Germany; Naziism is founded on the Prussian
tradition, and therefore penetrates more deeply into the soul of the people
than one man's influence can do. That is why the movement is to be
reckoned with as a serious menace to the peace of the world.
BRITAIN'S WAR-HORSE
WAR MEMOIRS OF DAVID LLOYD GEORGE.
As to the causes of the world war Lloyd George's Memoirs contribute
nothing new except in so far as they throw more light on Edward Grey's
character and the ignorance of cabinet members of Britain's foreign
entanglements and their intense occupation with home affairs. Lloyd
George's attack upon the inefficiency, stubborn obstinacy, and narrow out-
look of the professional military leaders comes as no revelation to those
who had dealings with the "brass-hats." But his account of the stupid
mistakes which brought the Allies to the brink of disaster is amazingly
interesting. His picture of Kitchener is particularly valuable. The
description of how British industry was eventually harnessed to Britain's
war needs by civilian leaders under Lloyd George's dynamic leadership
makes fascinating reading. While his discussion of prohibition and liquor
control should interest both "Wets" and "Drys." The Memoirs throw
further light on the Russian collapse in 1915, and the Allies' blunders in
the Balkans. Volume I has been received by the Library. (William Yale)




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