Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00052
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: June 1933
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00052
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Bro

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New IpshWeff -
Durham, New Hampshire A -
MARVIN A. MILLER, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, 'P1w Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912"
Volume 8, Number 9 Monthly from October to June

JUNE, 1933

THE PULITZER PRIZE PLAY OF 1933
BOTH YOUR HOUSES, by Maxwell Anderson.
It is significant that the last two plays selected for the Pulitzer prize
should take their settings in Washington and have a strongly satirical
note. The current selection is concerned wholly with the history of a cer-
tain House appropriation bill in committee. It sardonically depicts a log-
rolling congress which, even in times of depression, plunders the nation
by means of pork barrel legislation. A young idealist has an old-fashioned
idea that bills are passed for the good of the nation. Just now, under the
President's whip, congress is behaving itself so well that Will Rogers fears
he will have to find a new target, but it will doubtless return to the feast
when times are normal again.

DANISH FAMILY SAGA
WAITING FOR A SHIP, by Marcus Lauesen.
This new novel, in the style of a family chronicle, has been translated
from the Danish of a young novelist who has been received with great ap-
plause by the public and critics in Denmark. Its heroine is old Fru Juliane
Hagemeyer, a woman with a will, vigorous and defiant, even in the face of
death. She attends the festivities of a great family reunion in her honor
with all the majestic dignity and commanding power of her rigorous and
active years-to the end she is the one member of the family with strength
and vitality. True to her age, her lone hours are spent reviving old mem-
ories and recalling the history of her own family, the Jessens, a one time
properous family of ship owners and sea captains, now degenerated by
circumstances and the inherent weaknesses of the family.

"KING OF MISSISSIPPI KEELBOATMEN"
MIKE FINK, by Walter C. Blair and Franklin J. Meine.
America's pioneer history is rich in legendary characters such as
Daniel Boone, Paul Bunyan, Kit Carson and Mike Fink. Yarns, omitted
from histories but recreated by the men of the pioneer days, "bring back
the strength, the exuberance, the roaring laughter of America in her
glorious youth." Mike, born on the Pennsylvania border sometime about
1770, became in turn an Indian Scout, marksman and wrestler, boatman,
and finally trapper. New trails and new lands lured him always to follow
the frontier as it moved westward. His life was an odyssey, none the less
romantic and adventuresome than that of the Greek heroes. His biog-
raphers have combined ardor with scholarship and have achieved an ex-
citing narrative supported by the gorgeous phase of America's frontier life.


4, rio.?







PESTS AND HOW TO SQUELCH THEM
SPECIAL DELIVERY, A PACKET OF REPLIES, by Branch Cabell.
It is with full appreciation of the irony of the situation that we write
a review of a book which says such withering things about reviewers. But
we hope to redeem ourselves by agreeing with Mr. Cabell that authors-
well, say most authors-are far, far above the creatures who review them.
These latter are not the only class of people who will squirm as they read,
for Mr. Cabell deals with other pests as well: those writers of the unso-
licited letters that every author of today receives. To each of the ten most
common types he writes two replies, the first one being what he must con-
ventionally say, and the second, what he would like to say. The second is
therefore the more interesting, the more truthful, and charged with a suf-
ficient number of barbed shafts to lay out even the thickest-skinned of his
correspondents.

A VALUABLE BIOGRAPHY
THE TRAGEDY OF TOLSTOY, by Countess Alexandra Tolstoy.
Tolstoy's daughter, who of all his family was closest to him, has
written this story of his life with a definite purpose. Her mother, a selfish,
scheming, ill-tempered woman, wrote a post-dated diary, interpreting
events in her own way in order to justify herself and place the blame on
Tolstoy for the rift which developed between them. This diary, published
after the death of both, engendered many disparaging criticisms of the
greatest of Russians. Alexandra was the only one of the children who
remained with her parents in their later life, and therefore the only one
who could write this vindication of her father. It is written with sym-
pathy and restraint, with understanding of her mother, and gives a fasci-
nating account of life at Yasnaia Poliana.

SOCRATES LIVES AGAIN
THE MASK OF SILENUS, by Babette Deutsch.
Socrates comes to life in this story of his last days, which, while told
as fiction, adheres closely to the truth. The atmosphere of his time is
created in a convincing manner, yet there is no striving for effect in this
direction. The author has been content to remain in the background, letting
the characters do the talking in words freely adapted from Plato. Socrates
is only a name to some of us, albeit one to be spoken in reverence. In this
book he becomes one of the greatest personalities of history, a man who lov-
ed wisdom and honour, whose sense of humour enlivened both the banquet
hall and the court where he was condemned to death; who sought truth even
while the hemlock was being brought, and drank the cup in the knowledge
that by his unjust death he would live forever in the hearts of mankind.

THE MUSICIAN VERSUS THE INSTITUTION
KETTLE, by Gustave Eckstein.
With Eckstein's flare for portraying genius Vladimir Munck, the
young musician, lives. Thrown in the seething kettle of New York art
and business, he is bewildered by his contacts with the bold, unsentimental
and detached artist, Maud Poliski. Then there is Raymond Rothstein, the
modern Medici; Cecelia Krutch, the restless woman; Franz Koehler, the
efficient magnate; Jeanette, the beloved music pupil; and Ben Schlicht, the
Old World musician. The author pounds the point home, as on the kettle-
drum, that art comes from within, and does not come from organized aid
through endowments, teaching and importation.







HERE AND THERE AMONG THE NEW BOOKS
FLIGHT FROM TERROR, by Alya Rachmanova.
The diary of a young lady of the Russian bourgeoise class written
during the years 1916 to 1920. So horrible are many details that the pub-
lishers have thought it necessary to insert affidavits testifying to the
authenticity of the experiences. Gleb Botkin calls it the best book about
the Russian Revolution yet written.
ROUND ABOUT AMERICA, by Anne Peck and Enid Johnson.
May selections of the Junior Literary Guild. Getting acquainted with
America by train, by boat, by air, and by car, for the young and old.
LAST POEMS, by D. H. Lawrence.
Printed from two manuscripts found among Lawrence's papers after
his death, and include the whole of his known posthumous poetry. The
poems represent, as a diary, the last year of his life, and shed a serene
light on his inner life.
SCIENCE AND HUMAN LIFE, by J. B. S. Haldane.
Professor of psychology in the Royal Institution, the author of these
essays is a well established authority on the relationship which exists be-
tween science and human life. Some of the essays first appeared in popu-
lar newspapers and magazines; others have appeared among papers of the
Royal Institution.
THE GREAT CIRCLE, by Conrad Aiken.
A poet of Pulitzer prize fame turns again to fiction with a psychologi-
cal novel. With unfaithful wife and best friend as a background, and
aided by much gin and whiskey, Andrew Cather launches upon an almost
unbroken monologue to run the whole gauntlet of human emotions, inhibi-
tions, and disillusionment.
THE BIG CAGE, by Clyde Beatty.
A famous animal trainer gives us the low-down on his line. The art
of making natural enemies perform together, advanced trickology, thrills
of narrow escapes.
ARGENTINE TANGO, by Philip Guedalla.
The brilliant manipulator of words has now given us his impression
of South America. He trips lightly from one peak to another, or suddenly
descends to the plains to treat of fact and history. His explanation of
why "Latin America"; his discussion of the Monroe Doctrine; his account
of the tango, are illuminating and good fun.
MANCHOUKUO, CHILD OF CONFLICT, by K. K. Kawakami.
A timely review of the Manchurian state, again from the Japanese
propogandists point of view, by Japan's leading publicist in this country.
ONE, NONE, AND A HUNDRED THOUSAND, by Luigi Pirandello.
"This book not only depicts dramatically, but at the same time dem-
onstrates, by what might be termed a mathematic method, the impossi-
bility of any human creature's being to others what he is to himself."
MARIE ANTOINETTE, by Stefan Zweig.
In this portrait the queen emerges as neither virtuous saint nor no-
torious sinner, but as just an average woman who was forced from ob-
scurity by destiny to overstep the bounds of mediocrity.







IVAN THE TERRIBLE, by Stephen Graham.
A full length portrait of Ivan, the first of the Russian rulers to assume
the title of Tzar, and a stirring picture of Russia in the sixteenth century.
POINTS EAST; NARRATIVES OF NEW ENGLAND, by Rachel Field.
With settings chiefly in Maine, this little book brings us eight poetic
narratives of old New England of great lyrical beauty.
THE HOUSE OF EXILE, by Nora Waln.
"Here, in contrast to the picture Pearl S. Buck gave of the peasantry
of China, is a convincing view of life among a family whose name for gen-
erations has been built into their people's history, who for centuries have
been cosmopolitans, whose background is beauty and dignity."
FROM CHAOS TO CONTROL, by Sir Norman Angell.
An attempt of an expositor to show that the ultimate cause of the
chaos is the failure of our education to prepare modern democracies to
understand the nature of the society which they, as voters, have to manage.
The educational shortcomings are examined in detail and indication is
given of procedure.
WE, THE PEOPLE, by Elmer Rice.
The author of Street Scene is with us again with a play. Good, patri-
otic Americans are no longer citizens when they disagree with organized
industrialism, and should keep their opinions to themselves even though
railroaded to the chair.

PULITZER PRIZE BOOKS OF 1933
The Pulitzer Prize Committee, on May 4th, announced the following
as winners of the 1932-33 award in the various fields. All are in the library.
Fiction: The Store, by T. S. Stribling.
Drama: Both your houses, by Maxwell Anderson.
Poetry: Conquistador, by Archibald MacLeish.
Biography: Grover Cleveland, by Allan Nevins.
History: The significance of sections in American History, by Frederick
J. Turner.

OTHER NEW BOOKS RECEIVED TOO LATE FOR REVIEW
Anderson, Sherwood. Death in the woods.
Carroll, Gladys. As the earth turns.
Cohen, Morris B. Law and the social order.
Ferber, Edna. They brought their women.
Gregory, Horace. No retreat; poems.
Hare, Martin. The enchanted winter.
Harvey, Edwin D. The mind of China.
Howard, Sidney. Alien corn.
Jeans, Sir James. The new background of science.
Maugham, W. Somerset. For service rendered.
Murray, Gilbert. Aristophanes.
Roper, Arthur. Tragedy of lynching.
Starke, Aubrey H. Sidney Lanier, a biographical and critical study.
Steiner, Jesse F. Americans at play.
West, Rebecca. Saint Augustine.
Weyer, Edward M. The Eskimos, their environment and folkways.
Williams, James M. Human aspects of unemployment and relief.
Wortham, H. E. Chinese Gordon.




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