Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00051
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: May 1933
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00051
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

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THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"--Bkowning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
MARVIN A. MILLER, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912"
Volume 8, Number 8 Monthly from October to June

MAY, 1933

"A COLOSSUS BESTRIDING A CENTURY"
THE LIFE OF RICHARD WAGNER, by Ernest Newman.
This, the first of a three-volume work, carries the story of Wagner's
life down to 1848. It is the most important biography of the great musi-
cian yet written, for amateurs as well as serious students. Wagner's tur-
bulent career cannot be understood except in relation to his times. He
came into a world in which the musician was still an underpaid servant,
grovelling before princes, publishers, and producers. Nature combined in
him the forces necessary to fight this situation; his deplored unscrupulous-
ness in money matters released him from the slavery which had bound his
more honest and humble fellow-artists, while his genius and strength of
character at last forced homage from a hostile world.

A FAMOUS FAMILY
THE THREE JAMESES, by C. Hartley Grattan.
Mr. Grattan in this chronicle of a "family of minds" has not been
content to review only the lives of the two most famous members of the
family, William James, the philosopher and psychologist, and Henry
James, the novelist. Henry James, Senior, he also considers of impor-
tance, and by establishing the sons' relationship to their father he clari-
fies our understanding of the sons and their work. It is a scholarly book,
well written.

OLD HICKORY'S EARLY YEARS
ANDREW JACKSON, THE BORDER CAPTAIN, by Marquis James.
A biography written primarily for popular consumption seldom achieves
the distinction of a standard work. This volume on "Old Hickory," can well
be placed alongside the works of such distinguished authors on Jackson, as
Bassett, Parton and Sumner. It is more accurate than some, and certainly
more readable than most. True, the amount of original research is perhaps
negligible, but the author has used existing sources well, and has taken ad-
vantage of more recently discovered material than was available to earlier
biographers to bring out new viewpoints and facts. His is perhaps the last
word on the much discussed, and locally important, question of the birth-
place of Jackson-North or South Carolina. Mr. James succeeds pretty
thoroughly in giving South Carolina the credit for allowing the future
President to be born on her soil. Here is Jackson the pioneer, the lawyer,
the judge, the Indian fighter, the duelist.


.' :. 9







RESCUED FROM OBSCURITY
BEAUREGARD, THE GREAT CREOLE, by Hamilton Basso
General Beauregard ordered the bombardment of Fort Sumpter on
April 12, 1861, which forced Union forces to evacuate the fort and so began
four years of civil war. Then, at the battle of Bull Run, as second in com-
mand of Confederate forces, he further distinguished himself and a good
share of the credit for victory here goes to him. Yet, as years have passed,
his name has been almost completely forgotten, even in the South, due to
the greater luster of such names as Lee, Johnson, Stuart and Stonewall
Jackson. And so Mr. Basso has found it necessary to write a biography to
rescue the gentleman of Creole descent from oblivion. He has done a cred-
itable job of it and has given us an interesting work, despite his obvious
hero worship. Although the majority of the book concerns itself with the
years of the war, interesting bits of early and late years are given. In his
youth Beauregard had an ambition to become a Napoleon-his last days
saw him as manager of the Louisiana Lottery.

FAILURE REDEEMED
STUDIES IN SUBLIME FAILURE, by Shane Leslie.
Cardinal Newman, Charles Stewart Parnell, Coventry Patmore, Lord
Curzon, and Moreton Frewen men who lived for lost causes these
are the subjects of Mr. Leslie's brilliant book. They failed, but Newman
left us "Lead Kindly Light," and Patmore, "The Angel in the House." Par-
nell "lifted the Irish from serfdom as surely as the Czar Alexander freed
the Russian peasant." Curzon ruled India magnificently, and Frewen se-
cured "penny postage" between Great Britain and the United States.

TWO BOOKS OF THE SEA
WHALING IN THE ANTARCTIC, by A. G. Bennett.
The author does not attempt to deal with the detailed history of whales
and whaling, as Herman Melville has so admirably done, but he does do a
very interesting thing in summing up the whaling industry of the past and
in giving a splendid and authoritative account of whaling today. If you
have never met a whale read Whaling in the Antarctic.
LOG OF THE SEA, by Felix Riesenberg.
One of the best sea books written in a long time; a book which only a
real seaman could write, for the material is gathered from many years of
service. It is a series of essays and dramatic episodes arranged in sec-
tions with a great feeling for unity and emphasis. The "lingo" is piquant
and vital; the style has a tang of the sea and a rhythmic swell and cadence
that carry one from crest to crest of the tale with the speed of a driving
ship.

"WE MUST BRING BACK PHILOSOPHY!"
A PHILOSOPHY OF SOLITUDE, by John Cowper Powys.
Once again Mr. Powys leads us away from the hurried, fatuous activi-
ties of the crowd to the contemplation of ultimate mysteries. Loneliness is
the basic fact of life, and only by recognizing this fact and building from
it can we create a philosophy of life which will deepen our happiness and
allay our suffering. The author offers us a system of thought whereby we
can strip life of its unessentials, reduce our personality to its inviolable







"hard central core," and having attained this "elementalism" we are alone
with the universe; we seek the company of the wind and the sky; we be-
come passive, like the rocks, and feel eternity flowing through us. Against
the background which we thus built up our daily experiences stand out
with a sharpness that forever removes monotony from our lives.
Naturally this philosophy will not appeal to all types of people, but we
think that almost everyone can add something to his capacity for living
from the works of this thoughtful writer.

AMERICA'S 1932 NEWS REEL
THE AMERICAN SCENE, by Edwin C. Hill.
The author has given us a kaleidoscopic picture of the front page events
of 1932. Some of the headlines of that year may dwindle down to mere
footnotes in history, but others will always be as vivid as Mr. Hill has fea-
tured them here. The year's displays of music, art, and literature are also
reviewed in a very entertaining and readable manner. Chapter headings
are surprisingly amusing, and show Mr. Hill's flair for journalistic wit.
The illustrations are very appropriately in carricature.

NEW FICTION
SOUTH MOON UNDER, by Marjorie Rawlings.
Many books have been written about the hill-billies and poor whites of
the South, but this enters a region little known in fact or fiction,-the
backwoods of Florida. The story concerns itself with three generations of
the Lantrys. The elder Lantry killed a revenuerr" in the mountains of
Carolina and fled to the backwoods of Florida. There he established a
home among the scrub, to live in terror of the law for the rest of his days,
where he and following generations managed to eke out a miserable living.
Lant, following in the footsteps of his paternal grandfather, turns to
" 'shining" as an honest means of livelihood, kills his man, and will prob-
ably live in terror of the law to the end. A strangely beautiful, realistic,
and significant first novel.
POCAHONTAS, by David Garnett.
Another novel based on accurate historical facts but achieved as a
work of art is the story of Pocahontas. She who was treated as a princess
when her English husband, Thomas Rolfe, took her to England, has been
for most of us only an Indian girl who saved the life of Captain John
Smith. David Garnett reconstructs the life of Pocahontas against the
historical background of the English colony at Jamestown. Pocahontas
grows beyond a mere place in history, she becomes an appealing heroine in
fiction. "Admirable is the author's sense of fair play. Indians and whites
are alike presented as human beings, each race with its own particular
faults and virtues."
HUMAN NATURE, by Edith Wharton.
It is human nature to believe that the attainment of desire will make
life complete, serene, and carefree. With her masterly gift of irony Mrs.
Wharton plays upon this belief in four short stories and a novelette. "Her
Son" tells of the joy and tragedy in a woman's discovery of her long-lost
son. In the short stories men and women grope darkly for release from
the circumstances of their lives, only to find that their freedom has stronger
chains.







JENNY WREN, by E. H. Young.
A city in England; a brown stone house; a bow window overlooking a
river. Louisa, the pretty, uneducated widow of the cultured Rendall;
Jenny and Dalhia, the attractive and educated daughters, seeking the hap-
piness and romance of youth, and feeling the handicaps of a mother and
father who were on different plains. A lack of money; a few lodgers;
several gossiping neighbours; a meddlesome aunt and a curate: and with
all this you have a good story with a happy ending.
ERIE WATER, by Walter D. Edmonds.
In this book Edmonds writes again of the country he knows and loves.
This time the building of the Erie Canal runs like a ribbon through the
story of Jerry Fowler, the young carpenter, who took his hard earned
money, which he had saved to buy western land, and bought Mary Good-
hill, an English redemptionist. It is a story of color and vigor told in short
dialogue with bits of picturesque description.


THE NEW DEAL
LOOKING FORWARD, by Franklin D. Roosevelt.
In the light of big news breaking continually from Washington since
March 4, we will be interested in "looking backward" in review of public
utterances of the President before that date. This volume is a compilation
of speeches and articles prior to March 1, 1933, consisting of Mr. Roose-
velt's views on such present day enigmas as, tariff, banking, judicial reform,
agriculture, power, railroads, etc., and ends with the inaugural address of
March 4th. "The result is an unhurried, dispassionate, entirely coherent
resume of his political philosophy and of the larger aspects of the program
which, as President, he hopes to consummate."


CENTURY OF PROGRESS SERIES
This is a series to consist of about twenty volumes, published in col-
laboration with the Century of Progress Exposition to be held this year in
Chicago. The purpose of the exposition is to depict graphically and sys-
tematically the last hundred years of intellectual endeavor; the purpose
of each book in the series is to indicate the measure of present day civiliza-
tion, insofar as the particular subject covered is concerned. They are in-
tended for the layman and are written by specialists in each subject. The
library has the following in the series; others will be added as published.
Animal Life and Social Growth, by Warder C. Alle.
The Universe Unfolding, by Robert H. Baker.
Man and Microbes, by Stanhope Bayne-Jones.
Time, Space and Atoms, by Richard T. Cox.
Earth Oil, by Gustav Egloff.
Flying, by James E. Fechet.
Insects, Man's Chief Competitors, by W. P. Flint and C. L. Metcalf.
Chemistry Triumphant, by William J. Hale.
The Story of a Billion Years, by William O. Hotchkiss.
The New Necessity, by C. F. Kettering.
Evolution Yesterday and Today, by Horatio H. Newman.
Our Mineral Civilization, by Thomas T. Read.
Adjustment and Mastery, by Robert S. Woodworth.




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