Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00050
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: April 1933
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00050
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

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THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
MARVIN A. MILLER, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Ham i .ei 4
under the act of August 24, 1912"
Volume 8, Number 7 Monthly from October to June

APRIL, 1933

AN ENGLISHMAN REMEMBERS RUSSIA
BRITISH AGENT, by Bruce Lockhart.
This autobiography is the chronicle of a romantic career in the British
Foreign Service. Lockhart's whole career, which centered in Russia,
evolved from his first post at Moscow in 1912, then unimportant, through
a series of terrific crises which followed in rapid succession after August
4th, 1914. He was "merely a keen witted young Scott who did his best to
steer his own government's policy in the direction indicated by common
sense and the logic of history." He is content to tell his story with unpre-
tentious honesty, utterly unadorned, yet with good humor, offering few
judgments and almost no opinions.

EARLY AMERICAN ART
AMERICAN FOLK ART, 1750-1900.
In this modern age when the production of art is left to those who are
artists by profession, it is interesting to see the work of the amateurs of
the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In those days young ladies painted
on velvet, blacksmiths turned their hands to weather-vanes, and house
painters made portraits. While the results were not always artistic, a sur-
prisingly large number of them were, as can be seen from the illustra-
tions in this catalogue of an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New
York. Anatomy and perspective are crudely represented, but there is
vigour, grace, and personality in much of the work here shown.

UNIVERSITY IDEALS
THE UNIVERSITY IN A CHANGING WORLD: A SYMPOSIUM.
These nine articles on the universities of Europe and the United
States are interesting not only for their analyses of university ideals in
each country represented, but also for what they tell, often between the
lines, of each national temper. The French writer tells of the struggle to
keep humanism, the foundation of French culture, as the moving spirit of
French universities. In Italy, the university is an organ of Fascism, shar-
ing in the creation of the perfect Facist state. England and Germany are
alarmed at the rapid increase in student numbers, with the resulting crea-
tion of "an intellectual proletariat . ., seed-bed of revolutionary move-
ments." Soviet Russia has its own problems. American universities are
discussed by two writers, from one of whom, Dr. Abraham Flexner, we
have heard startling things before.



too. n 7







CONTRAST IN BIOGRAPHY
ZOLA, by Henri Barbusse.
This is not the usual biography, with the subject's parentage, birth,
education, struggles, accomplishments, and death given in exact sequence-
though Zola, of course, went through the usual cycle. Barbusse's style is
far too individualized to permit him to use the old stereotyped form. We
first see Zola at the age of 29 in Paris. The background of his daily life
is given with colorful strokes. Next we meet in Zola's apartment and listen
to C6zanne Baudelaire, Mendes and Copp6e discuss their plan of attack on
romanticism. Then on to Zola's personal objective, his success as champion
of naturalism, his politics, his private life, his achievements as a novelist,
until we come to a last chapter called "Zola, 1932."
HENRY ADAMS, by James Truslow Adams.
In sharp contrast with the above biography is this life of Henry
Adams. The treatment in this case follows the conventional plan; the style
is smoothly flowing. As for subject matter, the whole tenor of Henry
Adams' life was so far removed from that of Zola that comparison is hardly
possible. Adams had his struggles, but not with poverty and obscurity as
in Zola's case. "His difficulty was to find any career that would lead in a
dignified way to anything sufficiently big for a fourth generation Adams."
This biography is brief, but many phases of his life are so completely
covered in "The Education of Henry Adams" that repetition would be use-
less. It supplements that work and forms the only complete biography
of him which has yet been written.

THE ULTRA VIOLET RAY IN HEALTH
THE CURATIVE VALUE OF LIGHT, by Edgar Mayer.
The uses of sunlight in health and disease, of sun-lamps and irradiated
foods, have been of widespread interest in recent years. The author of this
interesting book tells the effect of sunlight on the body, the cases where it
is of proven value, those of doubtful value, and warns people to exercise
caution with unproved treatments.

MAYAS OF YUCATAN
PEOPLE OF THE SERPENT, by Edward H. Thompson.
Edward Thompson spent forty years in Yucatan with the greater
part ostensibly as American Consul, but in reality with the purpose of
studying the old Mayan civilization. Here he has given us an absorbing
book, consisting of an admirable mixture of fact, fancy and reminiscence.
He touches upon the ever fascinating subject of "Atlantis," traces briefly
the rise and fall of a remarkable people, unearths magnificent examples of
their art and folklore, and mixes the whole with many exciting personal
experiences; such as, a battle with a huge rattlesnake in the bottom of an
abandoned well, a wild ride in a native volan, and an exploration, by means
of diving apparatus, of the bottom of the Sacred Well at Chichen ItzA.

MAINE FIRST
ROMANTIC AND HISTORIC MAINE, by A. H. Verrill.
The author points out that Maine has been, and is first in many dis-
tinctive ways, but it is "to preserve and to point out the romantic side of
Maine, to bring the strange, unusual, little known and romantic features
of the state to the attention of visitors" that he has written the book.







NEW FICTION
ADVENTURES OF THE BLACK GIRL IN HER SEARCH FOR GOD,
by Bernard Shaw.
In this short volume there is much to remind us of such good atheists
as Ingersoll and Voltaire. Mr. Shaw has outdone himself here in God-
slaying, with satire and vitrol, and appears, as ever, to enjoy himself im-
mensely. The black girl, with her Bible and knobkerry-the Bible is soon
lost, but she uses the knobkerry very successfully on false Gods-takes
literally the words, "Seek and ye shall find Me," and goes forth to find
many representing themselves as God, until, weary of her search, she
settles down to gardening and rearing pickanninies, after choosing for her
husband a red-haired Irishman. The author goes to great length in his
preface, which he places at the end of the book, to interpret the allegory
and to express himself on the Bible.
PAGEANT-A NOVEL OF TASMANIA, by G. B. Lancaster.
Van Dieman's Land, "where far-seeking English build a nation and
meet life with the ancient aristocratic virtues of courage, loyalty, grace,
and good humor," a colony eager to civilize, to end the burden or continual
loads of convicts, and to cope with the constant attacks of bush rangers.
The Comyn's brought all the pomp and gayety of English country life to
their crown grant in this British penal settlement being opened up for sheep
raising. The story moves with majestic power from Madam Comyn to her
son, Mab, and finally to Jenny, a clever but admirable coquette long after
she donned a spinster's cap. Choice of the Literary Guild for February.
COMPANY K, by William March.
A kaleidoscopic view of the whole scene of war from the soldier's view-
point is obtained by allowing each member of a company to tell a particular
experience in the World War which most impressed him. Contrasting
views are obtained occasionally with different accounts of a single incident,
as in the case of the shooting of a squad of German prisoners. All of the
bitterness and horror of war is here. The book deserves a place with the
very best of war fiction.
THE BOAT OF LONGING, by O. E. Rolvaag.
On the far coast of Norway a phantom boat is seen when death or
danger is near. Nils has seen it, and in the strange new land of America
he found a fellow-exile who had seen it too. But the Boat haunts only the
cold, bleak northern shores where parents wait with aching hearts for the
son of whom they are so proud, whose letters come no more, because no
doubt he cannot write while busy amassing the great fortune that he prom-
ised to bring back from America.

NOEL COWARD
DESIGN FOR LIVING.
CALVACADE.
"Design for Living," a gay and delightfully amusing comedy, is said to
have been written by Coward to fulfill a promise made to Alfred Lunt and
Lynn Fontanne when he paid back twenty dollars borrowed from them
before the days of his fame.
"Calvacade," a more serious drama, covers a period of thirty years in
England from the Boer War to the present. The events of national im-
portance pass by in a succession of scenes against which the family of Jane
and Robert Marryot lives out its span.







THE HOME OF THE YANKEE
NEW ENGLAND'S PROSPECT; 1933.
This volume is one to inspire the outsider with its scope and findings
and to give the native New Englander a stronger feeling of pride. Social,
economic, and governmental conditions and activities in New England
have been investigated and reported on by specialists in these fields. There
has been no effort to advertise New England or to glorify it, but the re-
porting of the truth has served to do both. The opening paper deals with
the historical background of New England, and is by James Truslow
Adams. Edward A. Filene has a paper on unemployment in New England.
There are articles on the food supply, agricultural production, marketing,
forests, fisheries, water power, manufactures, railroads, highways and
even the foreign trade of New England, all by competent authorities.
H. C. Woodworth of the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station
has a chapter on "The Yankee Community in Rural New England." De-
spite the variety of the topics treated there are unifying threads through-
out the volume; one is geographical, one an interest in the bearings of re-
search, and a third is a concern for the future. From the last the reader
gets the impression that New England will still be of greater significance
in national affairs than her size or population warrants.


OTHER NEW BOOKS
THE COMING STRUGGLE FOR POWER, by John Strachey.
John Strachey, cousin of the late Lytton Strachey, "gives a more
brilliant and illuminating analysis of the growth and decline of capitalistic
society than any other member of his generation has yet succeeded in
doing."
THE MARCH OF DEMOCRACY, VOL. II, by James Truslow Adams.
In recent years Mr. Adams has not been able to write and publish
books fast enough to meet the demands of the public. Immediately upon
publication, one after the other, they are on the lists of best sellers. His
peculiar method of writing popular history, together with the nature of his
subject material, are responsible. This volume takes us from the end of
the Civil War to the present, or from internal strife to world power.
THE EXPANDING UNIVERSE, by Sir Arthur Eddington.
This book is not entirely of a semi-popular nature of treatment, and
the ordinary reader will run into some difficulty in places as, for complete
understanding, some knowledge of higher mathematics is needed, but the
subject is a fascinating one-the theory that the whole universe is expand-
ing and scattering apart so as to occupy an ever increasing volume.
THE OBLIGATION OF UNIVERSITIES TO THE SOCIAL ORDER.
This volume consists of the addresses and discussions at the November,
1932, conference of universities held at New York University. Leading
educators from all over the country here discuss the present day problems
and aims of the university.
MARK TWAIN, by Stephen Leacock.
By applying an old adage we learn that it takes a humorist to write
about a humorist, and Mr. Leacock has done a good job of it here. He
evaluates Mark Twain as a humorist, rather than as a philosopher. "Mr.
Leacock has been able to find and leave Mark Twain the kind of a man he
was because Mr. Leacock is that kind of a biographer."




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