Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00049
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: March 1933
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00049
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LAN N
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browi 1. l r

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Ham
Durham, New Hampshire
MARVIN A. MILLER, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New hir
under the act of August 24, 1912"

Volume 8, Number 6 Monthly from October to June

MARCH, 1933

WE ARE GULLIBLE
100,000,000 GUINEA PIGS, by Arthur Kallet and F. J. Schlink.
The great American public, in the eyes of advertising agencies and
manufacturers of patent medicines, cosmetics, etc., exists for the sole pur-
pose of being hoodwinked. From morning until late at night, by news-
paper, magazine, mail and radio we are bombarded with high pressure
advertising. It is bad enough that products so advertised are merely worth-
less, but, in addition, many are actually harmful and dangerous. For ex-
ample, do you know that a certain toothpaste contains enough poison, if
eaten, to kill three persons, or that blatantly advertised antiseptics fail to
kill even the weakest germs? The advertiser's slogan seems to be, "Let
our copy-writer diagnose your ailment and prescribe. Why consult a phy-
sician?" The Federal Food and Drugs Act is antiquated and not enforced;
state agencies give no aid. We are at the mercy of the quack and the char-
latan to be used as guinea pigs, but we must be pretty hard to kill else most
of us would not now be able to take our daily dose of our favorite cure-all.

"CHINA'S FONTAINBLEAU"
JEHOL, CITY OF EMPERORS, by Sven Hedin.
Sven Hedin, the well-known Swedish explorer, led an expedition to
Jehol, summer residence of Manchu emperors, to study the remains of its
magnificent Buddhist temples with a view to building replicas of one of
them in Chicago and in Sweden. He writes of the historic events that be-
fell in this magic city, of the loves and deaths of emperors, court intrigues,
and visits of foreign embassies. The book is of particular interest at this
time because of the impending Japanese invasion of the region.

THE ROCK-BREAKER
BULA MATARI: STANLEY, by Jacob Wasserman.
This new biography revives the luster, perhaps dimmed by a genera-
tion, of the exploits of Henry M. Stanley, known to his native men as Bula
Matari, the Rock-Breaker. His biographer describes him more as a be-
lated condottiere or conquistador than a mere traveler or explorer-a hero
inspiring faith in spite of the defeat which seemed to follow each victory.
He was a man endowed with an inexhaustible supply of bodily and nervous
energy, whose destiny was the witchery of the great river Congo. As a
newspaper reporter he was sent to find Livingstone, the missionary-ex-
plorer, and it was this expedition which fired his ambition to follow the
Congo to the sea or wherever it might lead.



u. rnc. I







FREE WILL, CAUSATION, AND THE ABSOLUTE
WHERE IS SCIENCE GOING? by Max Planck.
Anyone who wishes to keep abreast of contemporary thought must
give a considerable share of his attention to the progress of physics. If,
as we have recently heard, the law of causality no longer operates in cer-
tain realms of the physical world, something is bound to happen to our
philosophical and ethical systems. If on the other hand that law operates
unfailingly, even beyond the ability of the scientist to detect it, what of
free will? Does either alternative absolve man of the moral responsi-
bility for his actions? Max Planck declares that exceptions to the law are
only apparent, due to our inability to calculate all the variables in a par-
ticular case. As we improve our technique and penetrate deeper into the
nature of things, we push causality further and further back into nature,
but this, he believes, does not invalidate the concept of free will for human
beings. We may have glimpses into the workings of our own minds and
those of others, but only a Supreme Being can see all the causes, and hence
predict the results, of our actions.
Although relativity has become a household word, the quest of the
physicists, paradoxical as it sounds, is towards the absolute. And this too
has a philosophical implication, for it leads us to look for "the reality be-
hind the appearance, and for what abides behind what is transitory," a
process characteristic not only of science but of all human effort to arrive
at the true, the beautiful, and the good.

WAR IS HELL
SHERMAN, FIGHTING PROPHET, by Lloyd Lewis.
Tecumseh Sherman (christened so by his father after a great Indian
chieftain; the William was supplied later by a Catholic priest) has been
regarded by many military authorities as one of the greatest generals in
history. His remarkable raid of the South during the last years of the
war was hailed as one of the great military feats of history, and it un-
doubtedly helped very materially in breaking the back of the Confederacy.
Yet for all his prowess as a fighter, he is perhaps more famous for his im-
mortal words, "war . is all hell," commonly quoted simply as "War is
hell." He was another man who didn't "choose to run" for the presidency,
though he probably would have been nominated and elected. This biog-
raphy has real meat, is not a mere half-baked "character study," as so
many of the biographies of today are, concentrating on the years of the
war, is well documented, and makes fascinating reading despite its length.

THE FLOWER OF KNIGHTHOOD
THE LIFE OF EDWARD, THE BLACK PRINCE, 1330-1376, by Henry
D. Sedgwick.
Edward the Black Prince was only ten when Chaucer was born. From
that rather inarticulate period little of his early or personal life has been
preserved, but to such contemporary chroniclers as there were, Mr. Sedg-
wick has gathered the material for this interesting and authentic life. To
the many who have been filled with awe by the hoary aspect of the tomb of
the Black Prince in Canterbury Cathedral, or to those who remember
Rodin's statue "The Burghers of Calais" and have felt a little lost among
these shadows from antiquity, here is a delightful way to let in a ray of
light. And, as Mr. Sedgwick complains, justice has not been done to the
Black Prince as it has to the other two martial heroes of England, Richard
Coeur de Lion, and Henry the fifth.







RECENT FICTION
ANN VICKERS, by Sinclair Lewis.
Mr. Lewis's first novel since the Nobel Prize award has a distinct
sociological slant, and almost convinces us that he deserved that award.
He here throws restraint to the winds and writes the life of a strong-willed
woman during a period in American history when the "weaker sex" suc-
ceeded in breaking the bonds of conventionality to gain suffrage and ca-
reers. Ann has her career, prison reform and social work, in the course of
which she battles for women's rights, better prison conditions, satisfies
her desire to see conditions as they are in the worst possible penitentiary,
and receives honorary degrees. The chapter in her life dealing with her
experiences in a certain institution is a most powerful indictment of prison
conditions as it now exists in places. Ann was forty-one before, ironically
enough, she finds it necessary to abandon some of her ideals to gain happi-
ness for herself. This work will take its rank with the author's best.
COLOURED DOME, by Francis Stuart.
A woman disguised as a man, plotting for the freedom of Ireland; a
man in a humdrum office job, longing for the fulfillment of his destiny;
these two strange figures move across a background of Irish gaiety. A
few hours of intense living, happiness, fulfillment, anti-climax, and Garry
Delea renews his striving to see beyond the coloured dome into the white
radiance of eternity. A beautifully written tale.
YOUNG WOMAN OF 1914, by Arnold Zweig.
The author of "The Case of Sergeant Grischa" offers us a second com-
plete novel towards the tetralogy which will be known as "Education Be-
fore Verdun." It is the idyll from the lives of two young people; Lenore
Wahl, daughter of a banker, whose family have fond hopes of a brilliant
marriage for her, and Werner Bertin, a young novelist, slow in gaining
enough fame and brilliancy to satisfy the desires of the Wahl family. With
fascinating detail the author gives us minute studies of civilian life in the
early fretful days of the war, as well as occasional flashes of the war in the
Verdun sector. There is a constant undertone of the utter hopelessness
and futility of war. Arnold Zweig writes with intimate understanding
and with poise of the troubles of the young woman and the gifted young
writer who becomes a common soldier.
THE LAST ADAM, by James Cozzens.
This is a racy novel of life in New Winton, Connecticut, at the present
moment. George Bull, the negligent village doctor, is far from the benevo-
lent soul he should be; his responsibilities for life and death hold together
the flashes one gets of individual and community affairs. There are petu-
lant, restless, Virginia Banning, her competent mother, Mrs. Banning;
there is May Tupping, the village telephone operator, who adds a bit of
gossip, and her invalid husband. This is Mr. Cozzens' sixth novel, and the
second to be chosen by The Book-of-the-Month Club.
BULPINGTON OF BLUP, by H. G. WELLS.
Perhaps all of us go "bulping" at various stages in our careers, but
for Theodore Bulpington it became the most fascinating form of fancy
and a very necessary comfort throughout his lonely life. Theodore, like
any average English boy, created an imaginative self whom he visioned as
a conquering hero, but, like his shadow, he never outgrew it. Mr. Wells
has fashioned a new word for us and one which may become as popular as
the "Babbit" of Sinclair Lewis.







OTHER RECENTLY ACCESSIONED BOOKS
THE YEARS OF THE LOCUST, by Gilbert Seldes.
This is the America of 1929-1932. Following up such works as, Sul-
livan's "Our Times," and Allen's "Only Yesterday," Mr. Seldes continues
along the same vein to bring history to the last moment. Here we find
record of events, such as: the stock market crash, the rise and fall of Tom
Thumb golf, which satisfied the impulse to make a public fool of one's
self; the moratorium; discovering a new word for the dole; the bonus
army; the 1932 presidential campaign.
MEN AND WOMEN OF PLANTAGENET ENGLAND, by Dorothy
Stuart.
This book gives a fascinating glimpse into a period so remote that we
have difficulty in investing it with vibrant life. The author has shaken
the dust and cobwebs from the people of medieval England, and has made
them breathe and move, plough and weave, before our very eyes. They go
on pilgrimages and give miracle plays. The crafts, vocations, and cus-
toms are described in vivid style and illustrated with contemporary wood-
cuts, tapestries, carvings, etc.
FORTY YEARS FOR LABRADOR, by Sir Wilfred Grenfell.
Here is the story of the "Labrador Doctor" rewritten and carried
through succeeding years. The story of Grenfell in Labrador is that of a man
who with indomitable will, courage, and faith "carried on," conserating
his life to the hard, but joyous task of bringing health, healing and com-
fort to the fisher folk of the North. Among these fishermen of bleak lands
he stands as a symbol of humanity and love.
THE PROVINCIAL LADY IN LONDON, by E. M. Delafield.
"The Diary of a Provincial Lady" brought forth cries of delight not
long ago. The Provincial Lady, now that she is on her way to becoming
a literary light and has her small flat in London, is no less delightful. Al-
most her last words in this book are, "Next year I should like to go to
America." She may find us amusing and add another part to her diaries.
FOOTLIGHTS ACROSS AMERICA, by Kenneth MacGowan.
This is an examination of the large share the theatre plays in the util-
ization of today's leisure. It reviews the Civic or Little Theatre Move-
ment, as well as the progress of the University Theatre in this country,
giving statistics and plans of outstanding or typical theatres. Mr. Mac-
Gowan feels that there is a deep craving for the spoken drama among the
people and that many communities are meeting the demand satisfactorily
through these small theatres.
THE STATE THAT FORGOT, by William W. Ball.
CAN AMERICA STAY AT HOME, by Frank H. Simonds.
GERMANY PUTS THE CLOCK BACK, by Edgar A. Mowrer.
MEMORIES OF A SOUTHERN WOMAN OF LETTERS, by Grace King.
THE VICTORIAN SUNSET, by Wingfield-Stratford.
THE ERA OF THE MUCKRAKERS, by C. C. Regier.
ALCOHOL AND THE MAN, by,Dr. Haven Emerson.
TECHNOCRACY; AN INTERPRETATION, by Stuart Chase.
RECENT PROSE, by John Masefield.
ANNALS OF AMERICAN BOOKSELLING, 1636-1850, by Henry W.
Boynton.
OXFORD COMPANION TO ENGLISH LITERATURE, by Sir Paul
Hervey.




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