Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00047
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: January 1933
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00047
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

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THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Library, University of New Hampshire,
r ham, New Hampshire
,/ IN A. MILLER, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matte r 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
S\e act of August 24, 1912"
Volume&. Number T Monthly from October to June

SiJNUARY, 1933

LL TO THE GOOD OLD DAYS
A PASSING AMERICA, by Cornelius Weygandt.
Mr. Weygandt writes wistfully of folkways and objects which are be-
ing crowded out by modern civilization, leaving us the poorer for their
loss: covered bridges, oxen, thank-you ma'ms; buckwheat cakes, brandied
peaches, the old-fashioned supper; feather-beds, bonnets, and boots. Many
of these are near the author's home in our own New Hampshire.
A GOODLY HERITAGE, by Mary Ellen Chase.
This is another book about the America that is passing. This time
the scene is of Blue Hill, Maine, where the author was born and reared. "I
write of a scene which can rightly be termed a native American one, and
I write not to draw a moral but to paint a picture. Rather would I seize
upon what made an age distinctive than attempt to present that age as a
palliative or as an example to a different present . Nor is my purpose
an overly zealous one. I write alike of the comic and serious aspects of
adolescence under a waning yet still vigorous Puritanism; of the lively
effects of the seafaring tradition; of education before it became an
"experiment." I shall be satisfied if these records of a past, near and yet
by the force of circumstances immeasurably far removed, may serve to
entertain those to whom that past is still memorable, may serve to amuse
and to surprise those who will never know it."

SHAW AND HIS OFFICIAL BIOGRAPHER
BERNARD SHAW, PLAYBOY AND PROPHET, by Archibald Henderson.
"I call you a Voltaire perfected . the first great comedic dramatist
in English literature." Thus does Mr. Henderson, author, scientist, pro-
fessor, and official biographer of "our greatest living author" greet G. B. S.
He has written no less than eight books devoted in part or whole to the
Shavian, example of the perfect ego, who thumbs his nose at America with
one hand and stuffs American dollars into his pockets with the other. Pro-
fessor Henderson has been collecting facts and fancies about Shaw and
dinning them into the ears of the world for the past quarter of a century.
His first book, in 1911, was a weighty one of more than 500 pages; this has
more than 800 and is full of SHAW from cover to cover. It is an extremely
well written critical biography, after the Boswellian method, and leaves
us a most complete picture of an eminent author and playwright.



u. O. O.







STALKING THE MICROBES
MEN AGAINST DEATH, by Paul De Kruif.
Those of us who have read this author's earlier work, "Microbe
Hunters," will find ourselves on familiar ground, as the present volume is
conceived and written along similar lines. "Microbe Hunters" concerned
itself chiefly with medical discoveries of past centuries, "Men Against
Death" with those of the present century. Here we have other microbe
hunters; such as, Banting, discoverer of insulin for the cure of diabetes;
Minot, with his liver-eating ideas for pernicious anaemia; Spencer, dis-
coverer of a vaccine consisting of ground-up ticks for the deadly spotted
fever; Schaudinn, discoverer of the microbe of the pale horror; Wagner-
Jauregg, who learned to fight a deadly germ by deliberately giving his
patients malaria fever. De Kruif's non-technical method of presenting
facts makes his stories exciting reading.

NEW HAMPSHIRE FOLK LORE
NEW HAMPSHIRE FOLK TALES, by Mrs. Moody P. Gore and Mrs.
Guy E. Speare.
As its part of the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the state
of New Hampshire, the New Hampshire Federation of Women's Clubs pub-
lished this volume, an attempt to bring together the folk lore of this state.
Indian legends, superstitions, old family traditions, and tales of famous
persons and places are retold here in the phraseology used in handing
them down from generation to generation. To one who is familiar with
certain of the legends others will undoubtedly be of interest, and all in-
terested in the early days of our state, wanting facing as well as fact,
may find the fancy here.

ESSAYS
A HALF DAY'S RIDE, by Padraic Colum.
Padraic Colum's rich variety of interest in people, in nature, and in
books makes this collection of familiar essays an ideal companion for
hours of quiet enjoyment. Whether it is a "Marriage in Manhattan" or a
"Meditation on Cakes" in the Luxembourg Gardens, he makes of it a
whimsical adventure. "Island Days" in Hawaii provides a delightful
means for understanding the dwellers of old-world Polynesia. Perhaps
it is his earnest sincerity, as well as his lilting imagination, which makes
Padraic Colum an ideal arm-chair travel companion.

FICTION
PETER ASHLEY, by Du Bose Heyward.
Peter Ashley, brought up among the finest traditions of the aristocratic
South, returns from Oxford on the eve of the Civil War. His uncle, Pierre
Chardon, had instilled in his mind a deep love for his country and Peter's
conscience becomes a much scarred battleground. All the pagentry of
Charleston, its love of the turf and of extravagant display, colors the
picture of Race Week, when even Secession is forgotten. The opening en-
gagement with Fort Sumter is perhaps as great a social event as it is an
act of war. Mr. Heyward does not load his novel down with historical
references. He uses them sparingly and with a full and charming effect.







FAMILY HISTORY, by V. Sackville-West.
A story written with art and delicacy and skill, qualities which we
expect and never fail to find in the books of Miss Sackville-West. A beau-
tiful woman, early widowed but still young, her thoughtful son of seven-
teen, and her youthful lover for whom love is not enough, weave their
drama against the background of a dull, conservative family. The de-
nouement is infinitely sad, yet so perfectly done that one could not wish it
different.
INVITATION TO THE WALTZ, by Rosamond Lehmann.
To "us girls" who can still remember our first dance with sympathy,
the "Invitation to the Waltz" is full of delicate humor and pathos; to "us
boys" who live again with Regie, Timmy, Peter and Rollo those agonizing
moments of a formal dance when self-consciousness tries to masquerade as
indifference, it renews the pain of pleasure. How Kate and Olivia looked
to and prepared for the great occasion, how their anticipation outran their
better judgment, makes a simple tale, a tale told with exquisite grace.

A GARDEN OF ROCKS
A SIMPLE GUIDE TO ROCK GARDENING, by Sir James L. Cotter.
This is a practical book for one in need; that is, one in need of a rock
garden. It is concise but complete, including the design, the creation, the
rocks, the soil types, the planting, the care, the fertilizers, and a list of
plants. The experienced rock gardener, as well as the amateur, will find it
useful and instructive.

SHORT NOTES ON OTHER NEW BOOKS
NAPOLEON, by Hilaire Belloc.
A series of dramatic episodes, told in the clear and penetrating style
of Hilaire Belloc. The pivot points in the career of Napoleon are described
as if by an eye witness. Well illustrated with maps and pictures.
AMERICAN POETS, 1630-1930, ed. by Mark Van Doren.
A collection of the most representative of American poetry, chiefly of
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
EARTH'S PROCESSIONAL, by David Morton.
Poems of great lyrical beauty.
SOCIALIST PLANNING, ed. by Harry W. Laidler.
A symposium by prominent exponents of the socialistic doctrine, in-
cluding Stuart Chase, Norman Thomas, Louis Waldman, Morris Hillquit,
and others.
WASHINGTON SWINDLE SHEET, by William P. Helm.
Legal graft in congressional circles backed with proof from official
government publications; some ways of the taxpayer's money.
WAH' KON-TAH, THE WHITE MAN'S ROAD, by John J. Mathews.
Stories and sketches of the Osage Indians by a man of Osage extrac-
tion educated in the universities of America and England.
THE NEW POETRY, by Harriet Monroe.
A new edition, revised and enlarged, of an excellent collection of
twentieth century verse in English.







BIOGRAPHY AND THE HUMAN HEART, by Gamaliel Bradford.
More posthumous biography, autobiography, and criticism by a
distinguished author.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF JOFFRE.
The commander-in-chief of the allied forces during the early years of
the World War forbade the publication of these volumes during his life-
time. They now constitute very important historical records.
MANAGING ONE'S SELF, by James Gilky.
Suggestions of a minister of ways of gaining mastery over one's self
by meeting properly the problems of everyday life.
OUR TIMES, VOL. IV. THE WAR BEGINS, by Mark Sullivan.
A momentous work is continued. This volume covers the years
1909-1914, and is a picture of the passing America during the last years
before the great European catastrophe. The years of Taft, Roosevelt's
political downfall, the beginning of the Wilsonian era, cartoons, muck-
raking, America.
MY FRIENDLY CONTEMPORARIES; A LITERARY LOG, by Hamlin
Garland.
Continuing the reminiscences of such books as, "Roadside Meetings,"
and "Companions on the Trail," this volume treats of those whose ac-
quaintances Mr. Garland enjoyed, and whose books, plays and pictures
were of interest to him during the years 1913-1923.
FAREWELL TO MISS JULIE LOGAN, by J. M. Barrie.
This little book is the first by Mr. Barrie in almost thirty years. A
ghost, a fairy story, or what will you, in the Barrie style.
GOD'S ANGRY MAN, by Leonard Ehrlich.
John Brown and his sons; their bloody years in Kansas and the Har-
per's Ferry affair in historical fiction.
SELECTED ESSAYS, by T. S. Eliot.
A selection by Mr. Eliot of his best, reprinted from various sources.

SOME BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
Pollwiggle's Progress, by Wilfred Bronson.
Cricket and the Emperor's Son, by Elizabeth Coatsworth.
Ghosts of the Scarlet Fleet, by Edward Evans.
Hepatica Hawks, by Rachel Field.
Uncle Bill, by Will James.
Jerry; the Adventures of an Army Dog, by Sterner Meek.
Swift Rivers, by Cornelia Meigs.
Nicholas and the Golden Goose, by Annie Carroll Moore.
Donkey of God, by Louis Untermeyer.
Little House in the Big Woods, by Laura Wilder.

AN EXHIBITION
We are fortunate in being able to announce an exhibit at the Library
of the Fifty Print Travel Salon of the Pictorial Photographers of America,
representing the work of four well-known pictorialists. The exhibition
will begin about the second week in January and will probably continue
throughout the month. Watch for further local announcements.




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