Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00044
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: October 1932
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00044
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LA ER
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Br

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hani .,
Durham, New Hampshire '-'
MARVIN A. MILLER, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912"

Volume 8, Number 1 Monthly from October to June

OCTOBER, 1932

SUMMER AND EARLY FALL FICTION
OBSCURE DESTINIES, by Willa Cather.
"Obscure Destines" is the perfect title for these three stories of the
West that are grouped together in Willa Gather's latest book. Neighbor
Rosicky of the first story is a Bohemian immigrant who found the life he
wanted on a western farm; old Mrs. Harris of the second is a drudge, over-
worked by her daughter and grandchildren, but clinging nevertheless to
her ideals; the two friends of the last story are men who have had years
of helpful friendship until they are parted by a question of politics. Ob-
scure people, yes, but so sympathetically created by Miss Gather that we
understand their lot and see it in relation to a broader life.
FARAWAY, by J. B. Priestley.
William Dursley was a conservative and cautious soul about to settle
into fixed bachelor habits when his Uncle Baldwin left him one-third of a
secret. This secret, not one of pirate treasure, led him to adventures in
the South Seas in company with Commander Ivybridge, retired, P. T. Riley
of San Francisco, and a certain Mr. Ramsbottom, who were the possessors
of the other two-thirds of the secret. The indolent and decadent life on
Maibo and Tahiti, with its tropical hues, coral reefs, colored fish, and
natives, is described in such romantic and glowing terms that you involun-
tarily say to yourself, "What a moving picture this would make!"
THE SHELTERED LIFE, by Ellen Glasgow.
Eva Birdsong was a beauty in the days when beauty was a vocation
for the fortunate women who possessed it, but her loveliness always shel-
tered her from the warmth of life. Jenny Blair Archibald, sheltered from
the frankness of our generation and innocent of her selfish pretense, is
quite innocently the villain. General Archibald's life had been firm and
rich with everything that was good for him,-and with nothing that he
wanted. Ellen Glasgow writes with a wise sympathy for human weakness
in this new novel of a fading Southern aristocracy.
THE FAMILY CIRCLE, by Andre Maurois.
A popular biographer gives us a novel of French life. The family
circle, beginning with Madame Herpain, takes a full turn in her daughter,

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Denise, who after a variety of experiences arrives at the same place as the
mother whom she so despised. Denise's childhood is particularly well
portrayed.
THE FOUNTAIN, by Charles Morgan.
Received too late for inclusion in the June LANTERN, this is a book
with which we want to acquaint all our readers. Those who thought its
beauty esoteric have been surprised to see it climb rapidly to the top of the
best seller lists throughout the country. This is no book to while away odd
moments, but one to sit with quietly for a few hours. The principal char-
acters are an English officer interned in Holland, an English girl brought
up in Holland, and her German husband who returns to her dying of his
wounds. The war itself is far in the background of this triangle. Philos-
ophy, and the inner life, the life of the mind, are in the foreground. The
Englishman finds it impossible to withdraw from the world. The Ger-
man surrenders with quiet resolve the life that might, but cannot be. The
girl brings conflicts, beauty, courage to both of them.
THE GODS ARRIVE, by Edith Wharton.
The plot of this novel cannot be called original in any sense. It is the
old story of man and woman attempting to defy conventions and to risk
all on love. They elope without having gone through with the preliminary
divorce, and find they cannot escape from themselves and society. Mrs.
Wharton's depth of understanding and true sense of literary craftsman-
ship here carry the characters of her "Hudson River Bracketed" of 1929
through great emotional conflict and change, without allowing one to feel
that the plot is sordid or sensational. There can be no doubt that Mrs.
Wharton here retains her hold on her reputation as one of the country's
greatest novelists.

TWO TALES OF REAL ADVENTURERS
MAGIC PORTHOLES, by Helen Follett.
A book from the Children's Room that will appeal to all who love ad-
venture. Barbara Follett, aged fourteen, wanted to go to sea, so her
mother went with her and wrote this account of the voyage. "Islands and
schooners go together," said Barbara, so they decided to visit islands only.
The two shipmates, an old sea chest their only baggage, explored the
Caribbean, making no plans and embarking on any ship that hove in
sight. They met alligator pears and spiders, jolly negroes and friendly
old sea captains. Then off to the South Pacific when they met a ship
bound for Tahiti.
THIRTY YEARS IN THE GOLDEN NORTH, by Jan Welzl.
This book was conceived much after the fashion of a Trader Horn.
A frost-bitten old adventurer from the far North tells of his travels to
journalists, who put them into book form. Thirty years in a land which
has a mild temperature of 70 to 85 degrees below zero for a great part of
the year, and impatient for more. That is Jan Welzl. Here is an account
of life among the Eskimos, traders, whalers and fortune hunters of the
extreme Arctic regions. We shall have to regard some as imagination,
but much of that which is undoubtedly the truth is remarkable to the point
of disbelief. The account of the coming of the frost is as gripping as any
to be found of a natural phenomenon.








WHAT WE DON'T KNOW
RIDDLES OF SCIENCE, by Sir J. Arthur Thomson.
In the field of natural history there are a vast number of still un-
answered and perhaps unanswerable questions. What are enzymes?
What is the homing instinct of birds? How does a crab replace a lost leg?
What is a dream? Do animals think? Why do we laugh? On all these
questions and many more the author tells how much we know, what we
guess, and how much remains to be found out. We may say "We do not
know," but we must never say "We shall not know." That evolution has
been mainly progress we cannot deny, unless we change the definition of
"progress". "There have been many extinctions . and many retro-
gressions; but on the whole there has been an increase in the fulness and
freedom of life and a trend towards the emancipation of mind. Why
should we let this stop ?"
AN EXPERIMENT IN EDUCATION
THE EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE, by Alexander Meiklejohn.
Dr. Meiklejohn has made a careful statement of the principles on
which the experimental college at the University of Wisconsin-was based,
and has traced the progress made and the difficulties met with in the five
years of its existence. He has dared to express constructively the wide-
spread belief that undergraduate teaching needs renovation.

THE MERRY MAHARAJAH
HINDOO HOLIDAY, AN INDIAN JOURNAL, by J. R. Ackerley.
As secretary to a real Maharajah whom he disguises under a fictitious
name, the author spent six months in the weird land of India. His journal
gives an intimate glimpse into the lives of the people among whom he lived,
-the Maharajah, alternately jolly and sad, cracking bad jokes and asking
in the next breath, "Is there an Absolute?" Then there is the crafty and
amusing Abdul, who teaches him a little Hindi and a great deal of psy-
chology.
MAN OR BEAST?
THE ANIMAL KINGDOM, by Philip Barry.
A comedy utterly modern in treatment, yet old and ageless in theme.
Barry's artist characters are clearly drawn; the dialogues are neither
subtle nor clever but good reading; much that goes on in the minds of the
actors must be imagined. Cecelia Henry, Tom Collier's wife, and Daisy
Sage are direct opposites playing on Tom with skill and native instinct.
The ending is swift and perhaps unexpected.

THE MAID OF ORLEANS
THE TRIAL OF JEANNE D'ARC, translated into English from the
original Latin and French documents by W. P. Barrett.
For the first time the complete record of one of the most famous trials
of history is available to the English-speaking world. It is "a masterpiece
of partiality under the appearance of the most regular of procedures.
Rarely has injustice taken the likeness of justice, to this degree; rarely
has an assembly seemed so little imbued with zeal for the safety of the soul
and body of a poor and saintly girl; rarely has one invoked with such
hypocrisy its own impartiality and shown likewise a false good-will towards
helping an unlettered woman to defend herself . This trial is no longer
precisely that of Jeanne. It has become the trial of her judges."








BRIEF NOTES
FACT, ,THE ROMANCE OF MIND, by Henry Osborn Taylor.
Fact and the way it is apprehended by the primitive, the religious,
the imaginative, the business, and the reasoning faculties in man: "There
is something valid and true in all of them . The surest facts for us
are those which best accord with our whole nature and satisfy it."
JOHN WESLEY, by C. E. Vulliamy.
A new biography of the founder of Methodism, which is also a study
of the beginnings of revivalism.
SOME NOTES ON AMERICAN PEWTERERS, by L. G. Myers.
Collectors of old pewter will find here much valuable information.
THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF DOCTOR FAUSTUS, by Christopher
Marlowe.
The fifth volume in the new edition of Marlowe's works, of which the
Library is acquiring a complete set.
PHRASAL PATTERNS OF ENGLISH PROSE, by J. H. Scott and C. E.
Chandler.
A fascinating book on a subject not always approached with joy.
While the sentence and the paragraph have received exhaustive study, the
phrase has received comparatively little, and yet it is the phrase which is
the life of the sentence, which conveys the thoughts that influence men's
minds. We have only to think of advertising slogans to realize how true
this is, while on the literary plane it is by phrases that style and effective-
ness are achieved. The book is copiously illustrated with quotations from
over thirty English and American authors, the reading of which alone
should quicken one's awareness of good prose style.
THE NEW NECESSITY, by C. F. Kettering and Allen Orth.
Food, clothing, shelter,-and the fourth necessity, the automobile.
This little book in the "Century of Progress Series" gives a brief history
of the automobile, some of the technical problems solved in the last few
years, and a few of the social effects of the erstwhile horseless carriage."
THE ESSENTIAL SHAKESPEARE, by J. Dover Wilson.
The nature of this little book is aptly described by its sub-title, "a
biographical adventure." So much has been written about Shakespeare
that one is inclined to doubt that anything original can be found. No
startling new facts are brought forth here, but there is a freshness of in-
dividual interpretation which makes the reading of it a delightful ad-
venture. Orthodox views are lightly regarded.
THE WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA, in twenty volumes. Editor-in-
chief, M. V. O'Shea.
A very up-to-date, popular encyclopedia, containing "the most inter-
esting, vital, and useful information out of the World's knowledge." A
great number of illustrations makes the volumes as interesting to look at
as to read. The set is listed by the American Library Association as the
best encyclopedia for children, but we highly recommend it to adults for
quick reference and for its clear and simple exposition of subjects of which
the average person has a vague knowledge. It is shelved at the left of the
door into the Children's Room, where it is available to both adults and
children.




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