Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00042
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: May 1932
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00042
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LA ERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Brownft

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshi B
Durham, New Hampshire
MARVIN A. MILLER, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912"
Volume 7, Number 8 Monthly from October to June

MAY, 1932

"THE ISLAND VALLEY OF PAVILION"
A GLASTONBURY ROMANCE, by John Cowper Powys.
Into the fabric of his latest novel Powys has woven a host of people
of contrasting characters, tinged the whole with mystical and emotional
elements, and produced a work of symbolism and beauty. Upon the leg-
endary lore of Glastonbury he has built one of the most memorable books
of the year. Through his pages one views a cross section of humanity
made up of both ordinary and extraordinary folk. In material alone there
is enough for several novels, but so skilfully has this material been handled
that it emerges as a unified whole. This is a novel to live with for weeks,
yet its great length is the least of its claims.

A GREAT ACTRESS AND A GREAT POET
SOUVENIRS: MY LIFE WITH MAE;TERLINCK, by Georgette Leblanc.
At the age of twenty Madame Georgette Leblanc recognized in a few
pages of Maeterlinck a spirit and a mind attuned to her own. Flinging
aside a contract at the Op6ra-Comique in Paris she accepted an inferior one
in Brussels, since there she might, she would, meet the young poet. From
the first dramatic meeting followed twenty years of devotion on her part,
of submergence of her career to further his, of almost a perversion of her
own personality to provide the atmosphere he needed. At the end of that
time came a cruel break, but in spite of the disillusionment she suffered
then, Madame Leblanc can now write of the glorious years,-years full of
the silences of companionship as well as the more vivid moments.
Scenes that stand out from "Souvenirs" are: her performance of Lady
Macbeth in the moon-lit ruins of the Abbey of Saint-Wandrille; the setting
of the lovely presbytery where Maeterlinck wrote "The Life of the Bee;"
and, a more humorous episode, the great man replying in a far-away voice,
"I am sulking. I'll sulk as long as it pleases me."

AFTER THE ACCIDENT
AND LIFE GOES ON. by Vicki Baum.
In this new Vicki Baum book, as in "Grand Hotel," we have a series of
mishaps bringing together very different people. In this case life goes on
and leaves Dr. Persentheim and Elizabeth with, their same daily struggles
to make ends meet. But can we say that they themselves are just the
same as before the automobile accident?
tbo

U.YI 1%0. V








ACROSS THE RUB' AL KHALI
ARABIA FELIX, by Bertram :Thomas.
When the newspapers announced on February 23d of last year that
the "Empty Quarter" of Arabia had been crossed, the world was stirred by
a feat reminiscent of the romance and hardships of Elizabethan days. Not
only had the largest unknown region of the earth, exclusive of the polar
regions, been laid bare, but, repudiating modern methods of transportation,
the explorer had relied on the old-fashioned camel to carry him across 900
miles of desert.
This volume is the author's account of his journey. It is both scholarly
and entertaining. The difficulties of the trip are realized only when one
reads of the constant feuds of the desert tribes and their hostility to non-
Moslems; of the necessity of taking astronomical observations in secret for
fear of awakening suspicion of black magic; of the scarcity of food and
water in the desert; and of the solicitude necessary at all times for the
well-being of the camels.

FAMILY HOLIDAY
THE FORTNIGHT IN SEPTEMBER, by R. C. Sherriff.
They may be commonplace, middle class people, this family on vaca-
tion, but they are also universal. You have met them scores of times and
in scores of places. There is no plot to this description of their holidays
spent at the same place and in the same way for twenty years. The appeal
of the book lies in the fact that within the circle of their experience these
people go as far as most of us do in thoughtfulness for others, nobility of
action, and aspirations towards the true, the beautiful, and the good.

AS ONE MAN SEES THEM
ABOUT WOMEN, by John Macy.
This is a provocative book and the fact that it will annoy most women
is proof that there is much truth in its pages. Mr. Macy likes women, we
think, except for those "egregiously assertive feminists," and certain other
kinds. There will always be controversy about "The Delusion of Equality,"
"Logic and the Ladies," and other attributes of women as discussed here.
The last chapter, "A Group of Noble Dames," is a portrait-gallery of
famous women from Biblical times down to the recent past, viewed in the
light of the author's opinions About Women.

A NEW HAMPSHIRE AUTHOR
LEADING A DOG'S LIFE, by Arthur T. Walden.
This is a dog's own story, written as the autobiography of a dog by a
lover of dogs, and especially one, a collie named Shirley. Aside from giving
one an insight into the workings of a dog's brain, accurate and colorful
accounts are given of life in New Hampshire and in Alaska near the end of
the last century. A thoroughly delightful book.

A NEW WAR STORY
AMONG THE TRUMPETS, by Leonard Nason.
Few of us have realized that there were horses in France during the
late war, except for draft, and food for hungry soldiers. Nevertheless,
this book uses cavalrymen as characters in its eight stories. Little actual







warfare is seen. Interesting and amusing scenes of a "back curtain" na-
ture are given. The lighter vein offers a pleasant diversion from heavy
wartime fiction. There is the story of army officers going on a stag hunt
not knowing that their game was a disguised donkey; the story of a visit-
ing veteran who spends his last cent to give an old warrior horse a soldier's
death and burial. It is a book you will enjoy after the slowness of the first
pages.


AMERICAN CRITICISM
EXPRESSION IN AMERICA, by Ludwig Lewisohn.
The lateness in the development in America of a national literature
has not been due to the hard and unsettled conditions of a pioneer nation,
but more to a moral restraint inherent in American traditions, for "men
wrote not what they thought or believed or experienced but what, accord-
ing to Puritan business morality a good and respectable man ought to exper-
ience and to believe." Lewisohn brings a freshness in ideas and expression
to criticism of American literature in this stimulating and very readable
book. He is a lover of literature, and his ideas are here expressed frankly
and brilliantly. He passes rather hastily over the early period, states that
Irving was the first important man of letters in America, and concentrates
on nineteenth and twentieth century figures. Expression in America is a
noteworthy book and well worth reading whether one agrees with the
author's ideas or not.

TRUTH LONG WITHHELD
THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF PEGGY EATON.
Margaret O'Neill Eaton, born in 1796, died in 1879. Refused admit-
tance to Washington society when her husband was Secretary of War
under Jackson, the center of scandal and political intrigue at the time;
such is more or less the attitude of history. Here in her autobiography,
which by a queer series of circumstances has just been published, we have
an account of the suffering endured by the woman herself and the proof of
her virtue. The wretched story of her misconduct, trumped up for political
reasons, nearly ruined the life of a beautiful, although rather foolish (as
she herself so readily admits) woman.
The book is interesting for its new light on the political dissensions
of Jackson's term of office and also for its unintentional side lights on the
vulgarities and rough humour of high society of the day (witness the din-
ner party at Judge Overton's in Tennessee). Let us hope at any rate that
now the sun will shine on "the fair fame of Margaret Eaton" and that in the
future Washington society will be kinder to reputations.


A DEVONSHIRE NOVEL
STORMBURY, by Eden Phillpotts.
An old-fashioned story full of modern Devon people: kindly Dr.
Johnsey, wilful Bessie Veryard, levelheaded Milly Venn, unassuming
Martha, and crafty Mr. Canniford. Stormbury is full of things doing;
wrathful disputes, legacies lost and won, and four successful romances
where old and young are married and live happily ever after.








"ALMOST ISLAND," AND OTHERS
NONSUCH: LAND OF WATER, by William Beebe.
With inspiration and humour and scientific skill William Beebe re-
lates the birth of Bermuda as he saw it on the First Day of Creation. He
makes a thrilling romance of the dawn of life on the Second Day, and the
subsequent development of bird, plant and fish. He tells of exploring
Almost Island; how he measured it with his air line for a radius and him-
self for the needle; how he shot fish with an under-water gun. Beebe is a
trustworthy naturalist whose books are called "the belles lettres of science."
Nonsuch is a book of romance and fairy tale.


OUR FOREIGN RELATIONS
THE UNITED STATES IN WORLD AFFAIRS: 1931.
This is the first volume of a series to be published annually by the
Council on Foreign Relations, to bridge the gap "between the past as re-
corded and interpreted by historians and the present as recorded and in-
terpreted . in immediately available accounts." The problems of the
present derive from the recent past, and our memories so soon grow dim
that it seems advisable to have some record of recent events wherewith to
orientate ourselves. The economic conditions of the United States as they
affect our foreign relations, conditions in Europe as they affect us, and a
chapter on the Sino-Japanese conflict occupy the major portion of the
book.


HISTORY BY ONE OF ITS MAKERS
THE HISTORY OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION, volume I, by Leon
Trotsky.
In a volume of more than 500 pages, comprising volume one of what
promises to be a momentous work, Trotsky has given us his own account of
the beginnings of one of the most important periods in modern history.
The present volume takes us from February to the July days of 1917; vol-
ume two will deal with events from July to October, when the Bolshevist
was victorious. There is not a dull moment in this book. Trotsky the
diplomat and revolutionist here becomes Trotsky the artist. His pages
sparkle with brilliancy and vividness. Bolshevist Russia is looming larger
and larger on the horizon of world history, and everyone who makes
pretense of keeping abreast of modern events is under obligation to read
this history of a revolution by a man who was largely responsible for its
success.


A FEW OTHER NEW ADDITIONS
Brooks, Van Wyck. Life of Emerson.
Duncan, Isadora. My Life.
Great English short stories.
Page, Elwin L. George Washington in New Hampshire.
Palmer, Frederick. Newton D. Baker.
Yale University. Department of personnel study. The choice of an
occupation.




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