Title: Library lantern
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00040
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: March 1932
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00040
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTE N
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
.T. DORIS DART, Acting Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912"

Volume Seven, Number 6 Monthly from October to June

MARCH, 1932

"All the glory of the world would be buried in oblivion, unless God had provided
mortals with the remedy of books."-Philobiblon of Richard de Bury, 1345.


"ESSAYS IN SCIENTIFIC HUMANISM"
WHAT DARE I THINK? by Julian Huxley.
The author, like his illustrious grandfather, speaks not only as a rec-
ognized scientist but as an interpreter. In the conflict between the truly
epoch-making new ideas and the natural conservatism of society, he repre-
sents the skirmish troops, who have already reconnoitred so far as to ride
clear around the opposing forces. The prevailing theme is the familiar
modern one that man is the first creature to appear in Nature's long ex-
periment who has the power to shape his own destiny, in part at least, and
that he has already interfered with external nature so much, and added
amendments to the constitution of his own nature so far that he must go
on with the task or be destroyed; the only way out is straight through.
There is a warmth and discernment in the author's attitude toward religion
which is reassuring.

"THE LADY EDITOR"
THE LADY OF GODEY'S, by Ruth E. Finley.
Many a valiant fight was fought in the pages of Godey's Book by its
"lady editor," Sarah Josepha Hale, for reforms which are an accepted part
of our social code today. Though possessed of a twentieth century outlook
she was too clever to argue ahead of her times, and gave her public only
what she knew it could comprehend. Thus she advocated education for
women not because it was their inherent right, but because it would make
them more agreeable to their husbands. The "Letters from a Husband,"
written by herself, supplemented the appeals most touchingly.

0qM VA.
%o*1 0 o 4








TWO BOOKS IN THE REMINISCENT VEIN
DISCRETIONS, by Frances, Countess of Warwick.
"Discretions" might well have been called "Digressions." Lady War-
wick jots down her recollections as they come to mind. Kings, dukes, and
duchesses, Marlborough House functions and race-meets, form the back-
ground for a rich assortment of striking anecdote.
Since Lady Warwick was one of the first women of Society to realize
that the day of great privileges and great estates was doomed, her memoirs
form an interesting commentary on the passing of the Edwardian era.

LIFE WAS WORTH LIVING, by W. Graham Robertson.
This is a highly delightful book filled with reminiscences of the great
and near-great. It deals with painters, actors, and literary figures of the
late Victorian and Edwardian periods. Mr. Robertson's quaint twists of
humour gives the book a charm all its own.



NEW FICTION
MR. AND MRS. PENNINGTON, by Francis Brett Young.
Susan, young, pretty, and full of aspirations; Dick, so good, solid,
kind. What went wrong with their marriage at first? Therein lies the
moral: do not buy on the installment plan, and do not become indebted to
some one you dislike. This is a good story, well told.

THE WEATHER TREE, by Maristan Chapman.
Glen Hazard with its Tennessee mountaineers was a contented world
until an outlander came to develop it. In the end Progress was defeated and
Lynn Clayton, fleeing, left the valley once more at peace.

THE HARBOURMASTER, by William McFee.
The tale of Captain Fraley's great love. "She came up out of the sea,
out of the Aegean Sea, like a goddess of old."

MARY'S NECK, by Booth Tarkington.
The usual Tarkington story of the love affairs of sweet young things.
Mr. and Mrs. Massey and two daughters, harking from Illinois, buy a house
at Mary's Neck, an exclusive summer resort "way down east." Their
troubles begin and end in an attempt to float the daughters in the proper
society. They start with the Bullfinches, run the gamut of the "real people,"
and finally end with the Bullfinches, meantime becoming entangled in all
the gossip of the social climbers on Mary's Neck.








A MODERN JULES VERNE


THE STARS IN THEIR COURSES, by Sir James Jeans.
A trip with the author in a rocket to the centre of the sun has more
thrills than "A Journey to the Centre of the Earth." Jeans writes so vividly
and simply that one cannot fail to be interested in the heavenly bodies after
reading this delightful account of what the newest telescopes reveal.



"A MONKEY A DAY"

HOW TO TELL YOUR FRIENDS FROM THE APES, by Will Cuppy.
If you have no better success after reading this book, we can recom-
mend several textbooks of zoology which contain the same material in more
detail. But if you prefer to be amused get your information from Will
Cuppy.


ON UNEMPLOYMENT

SOME FOLKS WON'T WORK. by Clinch Calkins.
If the title expresses your opinion, read these case histories of families
reduced to starvation and illness, whose breadwinners were able and eager
to work. Most of us do not realize what happens when changing styles
and seasons reduce the demand for certain articles. And this in the
"prosperous" era preceding October, 1929.



OLD CURES FOR NEW

THE CARE AND FEEDING OF ADULTS, by Logan Clendening.
Are you one of those people who cannot reduce nor put on weight, who
prefer beefsteak to spinach, and would rather have an extra snooze than
get up in time to do their daily dozen? If so you will enjoy this justification
of what you have been led to regard as your bad habits. Though perhaps he
condemns too severely modern attempts to improve the race, the author yet
drives home a principle too often forgotten in our hectic excursions from
one new theory to another: that the old beliefs and habits handed down
through centuries, encrusted though they be with superstition, have stood
the test of the experience of mankind. Grandmother served spring tonic at
the right time of the year, even though she didn't know it supplied the
vitamin deficiency caused by the paucity of winter sunshine.








PORTRAIT OF A REVOLUTIONIST
MEMORIES OF LENIN, by N. K. Krupskaya.
This first series of Mme. Lenin's reminiscences of her husband cover
the years from 1894 to 1908, during part of which time he was in exile.
The book has been compared with "The Later Years of Thomas Hardy"
in the following manner: "Both are unsentimental, unliterary intimate
portraits written by women who have served their husbands as secretaries
and co-workers. Both books contain excellent source material for future
biographies, and, quite without prevention, splendid examples of how re-
alistic biographies should be written."



LIBRARY NOTES

The Library has volume 1, number 1, of a new periodical which prom-
ises to be of importance. This is "The American Scholar," published by
Phi Beta Kappa with the following objectives: "the promotion in America
of liberal scholarship; a medium for scholars . ; a synthesis of the
arts and sciences essential to liberal education and a guiding philosophy of
life; an esprit de corps among the educated; the scholar's responsibility for
major social tendencies; a whole diet for the whole mind."
We have received a series of twenty-seven popular reading lists on so
many phases of science, prepared by the American Association for the
Advancement of Science. The Library has many of the books listed, and
alternatives for those which are lacking.
The non-fiction collection of the Children's Room has been greatly
improved by the addition of a number of books, among which are the
following:
Bufano. The show book of Remo Bufano.
Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance.
Dorrance. Story of the Forest.
Ghosh. The wonders of the jungle.
Hodgdon. The enchanted past.
Mathews. The book of wild flowers for young people.
Parker. The Indian How Book.
Richards. Florence Nightingale.
Roosevelt. Stories of the great west.
Seawell. Paul Jones.
Tappan. England's story.
Tietjens. A boy of the desert.
Weaver. The book of Canada.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs