Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00039
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: February 1932
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text






THE LIBRARY L
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-B

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Ha ir
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire
under the act of August 24, 1912"

Volume Seven, Number 5 Monthly from October to June

FEBRUARY, 1932

THE SEVEN FAT YEARS
ONLY YESTERDAY, by Philip Allen.
Prelude, May, 1919, Back to Normalcy, The Big Red Scare, Harding
and the Scandals, Evolution, Ballyhoo Years, Alcohol and Al Capone,
Home, Sweet Florida, Big Bull Market, Crash and After-all of which are
chapter headings from this narrative of our most recent past. Anyone,
especially if he is over thirty and if he has read the papers for the last ten
years, should treat himself to an evening of good reading with this book.

ROUNDED OUT
THE WORK, WEALTH, AND HAPPINESS OF MANKIND, by H. G.
Wells.
The gospel, according to Wells, is now complete. In little more than a
decade one man has surveyed our prehistoric past, our historic past, and
our future, from the points of view of biology, history and economics.
First came "The Outline of History," next "The Science of Life," and then
this work to complete the set.
The author has used the device of constructing an imaginary museum,
somewhat similar to the Deutsche Museum in Munich, and also the device
of an encyclopedia which shall be encyclopedic. These two volumes, 924
pages, are the guide book to the museum and an outline of the encyclopedia.
Between the museum and encyclopedia models and histories of all phases
of processes which affect the way we earn our living are explained and
described.
Wells uses the "Persona" concept of Jung to explain conduct, and
defines three types as nomad, peasant and priest. This use of a psychologi-
cal term makes this somewhat long work more unified and coherent.
The book is right up to date, since an account of Great Britain's fall
from the gold standard is included. The pictures are chiefly American,
and are similar to those found in "Fortune."








SWAN SONG
The Librarianship of the Hamilton Smith Library carries with it the
responsibility of conducting the LANTERN. The Librarian has resigned
and will leave shortly for New York, where he has a position in the New
York Public Library. This is the Library from which he came to Durham.


IN DEFENSE OF THE "ATTIC"
One of the editor's friends has just come in to tell him that the public
thinks "The Lantern's Attic" a poor, not to write a stupid heading. One
objection is that a lantern does not have an attic. One might pun by writing
that it has beams. The editor hoped the "Lantern" was well enough known
to have acquired some slight personality with the passage of time. A per-
son may have an attic. A second objection was that an attic connotes a
collection of junk. One reader did run down the titles of a recent issue far
enough to learn that all titles were not junk. The editor regrets exceed-
ingly that a good old New England expression as "attic" has now become
obsolete. According to the New England definition, an attic is a place
where one may expect to find anything.


EXPERIMENTAL DRAMA
THE LONG CHRISTMAS DINNER, by Thornton Wilder.
"The Long Christmas Dinner and Other Plays in One Act," is a de-
cidedly interesting group of experiments. There is a self-consciousness in
the style (Wilder seems to stand on a corner of the stage and exclaim from
time to time, "Isn't this a pretty trick?") but the most conventional critic
will find much to admire here: humor, pathos, satire. Those who are look-
ing for old wine in new bottles need look no further; these bottles are queer
enough. And the wine is not bad.


SATIRE ON BUCOLICS
DIARY OF A PROVINCIAL LADY, by E. M. Delafield.
Curious, very curious, that a provincial lady of England should have
so much in common with a professor's wife in a small New England town.
True we haven't Lady B.'s land agents, French governesses, but we could
easily find their counterparts if we dared. The question is could any one
of us keep such a delightful diary and confide to it such witty criticisms
while maintaining a decorous front to society? The asides in the diary are
the best parts as: "Query: Is it possible to cultivate the art of conversation








when living in the country all the year round?" and "Mem: Theory that
mothers think their own children superior to any other Absolute Non-
sense. Can see only too plainly that Micky easily surpasses Robin and
Vicky in looks, charm and good manners; and am very much annoyed
about it."

PEACE OFFICER AND GUN-FIGHTER
WYATT EARP, FRONTIER MARSHAL, by Stuart N. Lake.
When this country shall have developed a folklore of its own Wyatt
Earp will be one of its heroes. Born in 1848, he spent most of his 84 years
on the frontier in the days when a man had to be able to shoot in split-
seconds. Some of the chapter headings are typical of this entertaining
book: Covered Wagon Days, Guns and Gun-Fighters, Buffalo Range,
Tough and Turbulent Tombstone, at the 0. K. Corral, a Frame-up Fails.


MALAYA
MALAISIE, by Henri Fauconnier.
"Malaisie," which won the Goncourt Prize in 1931 could have been
written only by a Frenchman. The tropics are pictured perfectly. Les-
cale, as caretaker on Rolain's Malay plantation, is enveloped by the rank
voluptuousness of jungle life, the wet warmth of growth, and the noises of
the silence. He is educated in the mysteries of Malay belief and character.
Thus two educated Frenchmen give us insight into the soul of Malaya.


WRECKED ON A SKYSCRAPER
SWISS FAMILY MANHATTAN, by Christopher Morley.
A holiday on an air liner ends for this modern Swiss family on the top
of the Empire State Building, where, with all the ingenuity of their famous
ancestors, they adapt themselves to the strange surroundings. Eventually
descending to explore the jungle below, they discover America. Lecture
tours, speakeasies, and filling stations keep them happily employed in wrest-
ing a living from the foreign soil.


VARIATIONS ON A THEME
MR. FOTHERGILL'S PLOT.
Eighteen English authors have each contributed a short story written
around a given plot. The different versions range far in time, space, and
characterization, making a unique volume the reading of which is a real
adventure. One lays down the book with a tantalizing urge to write a ver-
sion of one's own, for the possibilities in the plot are far from exhausted.








THE LANTERN'S ATTIC


THE GATHERING OF THE FORCES, by Walt Whitman. 2 vols.
"Editorials, essays, literary and dramatic reviews, and other material
written by Walt Whitman as editor of the 'Brooklyn Daily Eagle' in 1846
and 1847."
WOODROW WILSON: LIFE AND LETTERS, by Ray Stannard Baker.
Vols. 3 and .4.
Two more volumes of this definitive biography. These cover the years
1910-1914.
SCIENCE AND FIRST PRINCIPLES, by F. S. C. Northrop.
"(This book) aims to determine precisely what contemporary scientific
discoveries im many branches of science reveal."
THE EXCITEMENT OF TEACHING, by William Lyon Phelps.
The third volume in the Kappa Delta Pi lectures.
ADVENTURES IN SOLITUDE, by David Grayson.
Of the same type as "Adventures in Contentment."
COVERED BRIDGES IN AMERICA, by Rosalie Wells.
Has many New Hampshire bridges.
THE AIMS OF EDUCATION, by Albert N. Whitehead.
Essays by the Professor of Philosophy at Harvard.
WELLINGTON, by Philip Guedalla.
The latest life of the Iron Duke.
THE LIFE OF SIR RICHARD BURTON, by Thomas Wright.
A two-volume biography of the man who was supreme in so many
fields.
ARIZONA AMES, by Zane Grey.
A "Western" typical of Grey's earlier style.
PALESTRINA, by Zoe Kendrick Pyne.
His life and times.
JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS: EDITOR AND ESSAYIST, ed. by Julia
Collier Harris.
Uncle Remus in a new role. In this book we learn of Harris's great
efforts to bring peace between the North and the South.
THE DIAMOND TREE, by Grace Saring Stone.
The author of "The Bitter Tea of General Yen" attempts a psycho-
logical novel. Three sisters, a spinster, a divorcee, and a widow come
together after twenty years of separation.




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