Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00038
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: January 1932
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00038
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LA*ftRN'
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Brdwni c

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hqhire,
Durham, New Hampshire ,. /-
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire
under the act of August 24, 1912"

Volume Seven, Number 4 Monthly from October to June

JANUARY, 1932

A BASIC BOOK COLLECTION
A LIST OF BOOKS FOR COLLEGE LIBRARIES, by Charles B. Shaw.
The title page of this book reads in part: "A list of books for college
libraries-Approximately 14,000 titles selected on the recommendation of
200 college teachers, librarians, and other advisors . for the Carnegie
Corporation of New York.
The list is divided into twenty-four groups by field of knowledge,
rather than by a library classification. Periodicals and reference books are
listed first, after which the field is divided into well-recognized subdivisions
with books under each subhead.
This book is in the Reference Room. The Faculty and others inter-
ested are invited to compare this list with the Library's collection in fields
in which they are interested.

COMFORT FOR JONES
THE REDISCOVERY OF JONES, by Simeon Strunsky.
Strunsky wonders why an apartment house with all modern conven-
iences should be called a rabbit warren by the social scientists, who at the
same time hail a lice-infested cave of prehistoric men as a social group
of the first importance.

ENGLAND REDISCOVERED
ENGLAND, jTHE UNKNOWN ISLE, by Paul Cohen-Portheim.
Cohen-Portheim, a young Austrian interned in England during the
war, has achieved a splendidly concise, clear, logical and withal sympathetic
portrait of England and her Englishmen. The book is scholarly; the writer
knows whereof he speaks, and has chosen carefully his words and facts
to present the important truths of English character, life and culture. If
England happens to be your hobby you will love the book; on the other
hand if England is in reality an "Unknown Isle," you will feel that you
have made a new friend.
0.0 .


U,6 0. no,.4








NEW HAMPSHIRE'S PRESIDENT
FRANKLIN PIERCE: YOUNG HICKORY OF GRANITE HILLS, by
Roy Franklin Nichols.
"Viewed apart from contemporary criticism, however, his life was a
valiant record of courageous idealism. This impressive study gives a dis-
passionate estimate of the man who preached nationalism and good will
from his early days as a country lawyer in New Hampshire until he
reached the White House, and analyzes the subtle transition that was tak-
ing place in American life at the time. The difficult days of anti-slavery
agitation and the growth of special economic interests are vividly por-
trayed, together with the many striking personalities that contributed to
the picture Not the least charm of the book is the atmosphere it conveys
of village life and Washington Society before the Civil War. Cover.


NEW HAMPSHIRE'S EARLY ROADS
THE TURNPIKES OF NEW ENGLAND, by Frederic J. Wood.
Thirty-three pages of this work deal with the Turnpikes of New
Hampshire. Turnpikes lasted for quite a while since the first was incor-
porated in 1796 and the last in 1893.
Durham is on the First Turnpike. Durham people will find in this
book the answer to the question of where the western terminus of "The
Turnpike" was.


ANOTHER NEW HAMPSHIRE RASCAL
THE MEMOIRS OF THE NOTORIOUS STEPHEN BURROUGHS.
In his preface to the "Memoirs of Stephen Burroughs," Mr. Robert
Frost, to whom their republication is due, places his discovery on the shelf
beside Benjamin Franklin and Jonathan Edwards, to prove that there
was enough wickedness among them to salt their young society."
The most popular book in the Library at present is Henry Tuft's
"Narrative." Burroughs was no better than Tufts.


THE NEW POET LAUREATE
MINNIE MAYLOW'S STORY, by John Masefield.
If you like to read aloud, you will like "Minnie Maylow's Story." It
is highly entertaining, just the sort of thing one might expect of a court
singer-or Poet Laureate: conventional, highly polished, entertaining.
The poet of barrooms and open seas, forgetting his resounding "Consecra-
tion." retells old court tales and fashions neat imitations of Chaucer.
Don't forget to read aloud the catalog of the locusts in the title poem.








A NEW FAMILY TREE
MAID IN WAITING, by John Galsworthy.
Here we have another English family-the Cherrells (spelled Char-
well) with a few Forsytes in the background. Dinny Cherrell is as ap-
pealing a heroine as Galsworthy ever has portrayed, but his American
professor is so unconvincing he is ridiculous.

THE BROWNINGS
ANDROMEDA IN WIMPOLE STREET, by Dorothy Bayhes.
A selection of passages from the letters of Robert Browning and
Elizabeth Barrett, with sufficient connecting narrative to give coherence
to the story they tell. This book rounds out the events depicted in "The
Barretts of Wimpole Street," by introducing Elizabeth as a small child,
and concluding with her life in Italy until her death.

ALWAYS A COMPROMISER
GEORGE BERNARD SHAW, by Frank Harris.
Compromise, according to Harris, is the keynote of Shaw's character;
whether in love or war, in the theatre or the Fabian Society-he contin-
ually gave promise of greatness which he did not fulfill. But Harris
could not portray Shaw and leave himself out of the picture, and of the
two there is no doubt that Shaw emerges the greater man.
Harris had the misfortune to die first, hence his book appears with an
introduction and postscript by Shaw.

PHILOSOPHY OF A COLLECTOR
THE ARTIST SEES DIFFERENTLY, by Duncan Phillips.
Volume one is a collection of essays by Duncan Phillips, many of which
appeared in the magazine "Art and Understanding." Volume two con-
tains 244 very fine plates from the pictures in the Phillips Memorial Gal-
lery. As the title suggests Mr. Phillips makes a strong plea for individ-
uality in expression. His warm sympathy and developed critical judgment
made his essays on the modernists especially good.

L'ILLUSTRATION NOEL
A lack in American civilization is a weekly similar to "L'Illustration"
or the "London Illustrated News." The latter publishes an American edi-
tion, which proves the point. At Christmas this lack is even more apparent
than ever, for then comes "L'Illustration Noel" and the "Christmas Num-
ber" of the "London Illustrated News."
This year "L'Illustration Noel" is even more attractive than usual
with its reproductions of famous paintings, its varied papers and printing.
The reproduction of water colors in a forthcoming edition of "Maria Chap-
delaine" will interest those who have read that great book.
This number is too fragile to run the risk of circulation. Hence it is
to be called for at the circulation desk, and is to be read only in the Library.








THE LANTERN'S ATTIC
CHILDREN AND OLDER PEOPLE, by Ruth Suckow.
Short stories about small-town people.
AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHT DAYS, by Post and Gatty.
Their story, with a typical introduction by Will Rogers.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT, by Henry F. Pringle.
"The figure which emerges is almost unexpectedly familiar." Books.
The contemporary cartoons given still have pungency.
THE WET PARADE, by Upton Sinclair.
The Crusader attacks Demon Rum.
THE LITTLE GREEN SHUTTER, by Brand Whitlock.
A smoothly written anti-prohibition essay.
PHANTOM FAME, by Harry Reichenbach.
The greatest publicity agent gives the show away.
AMERICAN BEAUTY, by Edna Ferber.
Changing New England in fiction.
JUDITH PARIS, by Hugh Walpole.
A continuation of "Rogue Herries."
SPARKS FLY UPWARD, by Oliver La Farge.
Revolution in Central America.
THE STORY OF SURNAMES, by William Dodgson Bowman.
The origin of Jones, Brown, Robinson, Smith and others.
SORRY BUT YOU'RE WRONG ABOUT IT, by Albert Edward Wiggam.
The author blows up our pet fallacies, with the hope of making us
think more accurately. Written in an irritating "man to man" style.
THE RELIGION OF JESUS, by Toyohiko Kagawa.
By a well-known Japanese Christian.
THE SCENTED GARDEN, by Eleanour Sinclair Rhode.
To add fragrance to your garden.
FARM LIFE: PROBLEMS AND OPPORTUNITIES, by Clarence Poe.
A review of the farm problem by the editor of the "Progressive
Farmer," with a list of recommended books and a study outline.
STRICT JOY, by James Stephens.
Thirty-three short lyrical poems.
THE SOCIAL TEACHING OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCHES, by Ernst
Troeltsch.
The Christian Ethic in its relation to the universal history of man-
kind.




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