Title: Library lantern
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00037
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: December 1931
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00037
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY L E
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light" in'Itb r o

Hamilton Smith Library, University of Ne I pshire, /
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire
under the act of August 24, 1912"

Volume Seven, Number 3 Monthly from October to June

DECEMBER, 1931

"ALL OF WHICH HE SAW ..."
THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF LINCOLN STEFFENS.
Now and again some one of the book clubs performs a distinct service
to the community by buying so large an edition of an expensive book that
the publishers can bring out an issue much cheaper than the original. The
first example of this was "The Rise of American Civilization," by Charles
and Mary Beard. This book is the second.
Steffens interviews himself from boyhood through university life in
California and Germany, to the start of his career as a newspaper man.
Then on to his "muckraking" days, the world war, Mexico, the Treaty of
Versailles; and so to post-war Europe-especially Italy and Russia.
Everywhere and in all things Steffens sought causes. Not who was
grafting, but what caused the "system"? Not who failed in honor at Ver.-
sailles, but what caused strong men to fail? Or, in other words, Steffens
sought always the answer to this: Who was to blame, Adam, Eve, the
Serpent, or the apple itself ?
Any book that can give a reasoned answer to the effect of forces as
diverse as chain stores and movies on our civilization is worthy of a hear-
ing. This book, however, needs no such moral urge to keep you reading.
It plows along on its own power.


NOW WE ARE FORTY
TWO PEOPLE, by A. A. Milne.
Reginald Wellard, at forty, has just written his first and only novel.
When he tells his wife about it she says the wrong thing, as usual, but she
is redeemed, in his eyes at least, by her transcendent beauty. Their love is
the main theme of the book, but the story is saved from vapidity by Regi-
nald's comments on life and people, usually kept to himself and the reader.
They are worthy of a grown up Christopher Robin.



u..g. 3








DIFFERENT AND BETTER


CANE JUICE, by John Earle Uhler.
The reader of college novels who is looking for the tetralogy of wine,
women, song, and cramming will find it here, but with slight changes. The
first three elements are merely incidental, and the cramming is rather con-
sistent studying. The hero, Bernard Couvillon, is a diamond in the rough
who dares to desire a pearl without price-and the implication is that she
will go to him gladly. He goes from the cane fields to the Agricultural School
of Louisiana, studies faithfully and experiments with sugar cane, behaves
barbarously in society, is brow-beaten into football, and has the courage to
quit the team just before the crucial game because his experiments
demand his time. His success in crossing a wild cane with a sweet cane
(symbolic of himself and Juliette) saves the sugar industry, and leaves
him with no good reason for remaining for his degree.
This "Cajun" is not merely an embodied idea; he is a very real person,
as are all the characters. He alone, however, is refreshingly different.



UNDSET ON A NEW THEME

THE WILD ORCHID, by Sigrid Undset.
A new novel by Sigrid Undset is a literary event of no small impor-
tance. This one shows the wide range of interests and deep insight of the
greatest of living Norwegian novelists. "The Wild Orchid" falls somewhat
below the excellence of "Kristin Lavrasdatter," which, however, is only to
say that it does not reach perfection. For maturity of judgment and a
sympathetic presentation of conflicting ideals of marriage and religion
"The Wild Orchid" is recommended without reservation.



A MAN OF LETTERS

THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF SIR EDMUND GOSSE, by E. van Char-
teris.
Edmund Gosse at the age of seventeen came to London to be an ob-
scure clerk in the British Museum. In a surprisingly short time he had
entered the pre-Raphaelite circle as one of its youngest poets. Soon he
was introducing Scandanavian literature to England, having by chance
come upon Ibsen's works. With his devotion to literature and fine critical
taste he was brought into intimate contact in the course of his long life with
many of the foremost writers of England and America. The letters in
this book give proof of his charm and his great gift for friendship. Mr.
Charteris supplies the necessary biographical notes.








MOVING THRONGS
ALL YE PEOPLE, by Merle Colby.
This historical novel of 1810 deals with John Bray, a young Vermont
preacher, who, stirred by the times set out for the Ohio country. "All Ye
People" whom John encounters make up a moving throng of picturesque
and typical adventurers in pioneering. The accurate descriptions of these
travelers, of local manners and customs, of the dialects of the communities
through which John travels show an antiquarian's knowledge and love
of quaint and racy words and customs. There is of course, the inevitable
love story, but even more is the book a romance of America's growth.



NEW ENGLAND TRAGEDY
MOURNING BECOMES ELECTRA, by Eugene O'Neill.
In 1926 O'Neill wrote in his working diary, "Modern psychological
drama, using one of of the old legend plots of Greek tragedy for its basic
theme-the Electra story. Is it possible to get modern psychological ap-
proximation of the Greek sense of fate into such a play which an intelligent
audience of today, possessed of no belief in gods or moral retribution, could
accept and be moved by?"
His play answers his question in the affirmative.



ACTRESS AND DRAMATIST
ELLEN TERRY AND BERNARD SHAW: A CORRESPONDENCE.
While it is a question whether these letters should have been pub-
lished, here they are, and with them a lot of inner light on the personalities
of the writers, and on the plays, players, and events of the time. Many
of the letters deal with dramatic criticism and theatrical affairs, others
express the deep affection which these lovers, who had never met, felt for
each other. Shakespeare and Sir Henry Irving appear as the principal
victims of Shaw's caustic pen.


GARDEN LORE AND OTHER SURPRISES
THE GARDENER'S FRIEND AND OTHER PESTS, by George S. Chap-
pell and Ridgely Hunt.
A book for a solitary winter evening or for reading aloud. Those who
love gardens, gardening and garden clubs will have many a chuckle of
sympathy and appreciation. Those who dislike to labor in the earth can
here find justification.








THE LANTERN'S ATTIC
COLD, by Laurence McKinley Gould.
Byrd's second in command tells the story of his sledge journey to the
Queen Maud Mountains.
MY FATHER, MARK TWAIN, by Clara Clemens.
A panegyric.
LIVING PHILOSOPHIES, by various authors.
"A series of intimate credos," by well-known living men. Most of
these appeared in the "Forum."
SHAKESPEARE AND THAT CRUSH, by Richard Dark.
A survey of English literature after the manner of "1066 and All
That."
THE BEST SHORT STORIES OF 1931. Edited by Edward J. O'Brien.
The latest in this series.
WHY WE DON'T LIKE PEOPLE, by Dr. Donald A. Laird.
The Director of the Colgate Psychological Laboratory writes on per-
sonality. Many tables for judging oneself.
THE BEST PLAYS OF 1930-31, by Burns Mantle.
Another perennial.
THE EPIC OF AMERICA, by James Truslow Adams.
America's story from the beginnings. Much is made of the influence
of the frontier.
FORTY-NINERS, by Archer Murray Hurlbert.
From Independence, Missouri, to the Sacramento valley, the author has
mapped the California Trail in picture, song, and verse. This work won
the "Atlantic Monthly" $5000.00 prize.

DELINEATIONS OF AMERICAN SCENERY AND CHARACTER, by
John James Audobon.
Essays by Audobon on the America of the Ohio and Mississippi valleys
between 1808 and 1834. These originally appeared as part of his great
"Birds of America," and were introduced to lessen the tedium of scientific
description.
AMERICAN POETRY FROM THE BEGINNING TO WHITMAN, ed. by
Louis Untermeyer.
The companion volume to his "Modern American Poetry."
KATRIN BECOMES A SOLDIER, by Adrienne Thomas. Translated from
the German.
Katrin, a sensitive, intelligent child of fourteen dates the first entry
in her diary: Metz, May 27, 1911. The journal ends December 7, 1916.
The years between are full of the tragedy of war.
SINCE CALVARY, by Lewis Browne.
The author of "This Believing World" writes a book with the thesis
that liberalism will triumph in the churches.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs