Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00036
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1931
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00036
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire
under the act of August 24, 1912"

Volume Seven, Number 2 Monthly from October to June

NOVEMBER, 1931

ACROSS THE RIO GRANDE
MEXICO, by Stuart Chase.
The author of "Your Money's Worth" and "Men and Machines" takes
time from his examination of a machine civilization to examine a civiliza-
tion based on handicrafts. This book is his comparison.
At times the book sounds like the praise of a vacationist for the place
he is staying-both in condemnation of where he lives most of the time,
and in its uncritical praise of the place he now is. Then Mr. Chase criti-
cizes the plumbing to hold the scales even.
"Mexico" is written in the same facile, not to say wisecracking, style
of his former books.

AMERICAN ETCHERS
The Library is fortunate in receiving from the Simpson Fund of the
Durham Library Association a three volume work on American etchers.
The artists represented are Ernest D. Roth, Alfred Hutty, Childe Hassam,
Philip Kappel, John Taylor Arms, Arthur Heintzelman, George Elbert
Burr, Kerr Eby, Troy Kinney, Louis C. Rosenberg, Martin Lewis, and
Frank W. Benson.
Each artist is represented by several reproductions in aquatone.
There is as well a short introduction to each by Charles Lemon Morgan
and others.

OLD DURHAM AND VICINITY
THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A CRIMINAL: HENRY TUFTS, ed. by
Edmund Lester Pearson.
Henry Tufts, one of New Hampshire's greatest rogues, to use a mild
word, was born in Newmarket in 1748, married a girl from Durham, and
settled in Lee. He soon left this country, since his continuous evil-doing
o04%








roused everyone against him. Tufts roamed around, until, as Colonel
Higginson wrote, "He died, it is said, at Limington, Maine, January 31,
1831, in the eighty-third year of an uncommonly misspent life."
The Library has an imperfect copy of the first, and only other, edition
of Tufts's "Autobigraphy." The preface mentions Mary P. Thompson of
Durham, many of whose books are now in this Library.

DEFEAT AND FAILURE
MATTHIAS AT THE DOOR, by Edward Arlington Robinson.
"He was a poor defeated soul." "It was the old confusion failure
makes." Such sentences from "Matthias at the Door" epitomize the thought
of the poem-certainly no new thought in Robinson who, as long ago as
1897, was speaking of the world as "a kind of spiritual kindergarten,
where millions of bewildered infants are trying to spell God with the wrong
blocks." Robinson is still interested in the nature of the mistakes that the
bewildered infants are making; and he has found these children no more
original than his prodigies of earlier days. Add to this oft-repeated sense
of futility the fact that Robinson, having found his m6tier, makes no
change (the same careful diction, the same faultless metrics, the same
concentration), and you have Robinson as he appears in "Matthias at the
Door," no better and no worse than in the "Glory of the Nightingales."
Robinson enthusiasts will find nothing to disappoint them.

TWO NEW HAMPSHIRE MEN
DANIEL WEBSTER, by Claude Moore Fuess.
"At last we have a biography of Webster which ranks with the very best
lives of American statesmen yet written-with Schurz's 'Clay,' with Wil-
liam Cabell Bruce's 'Benjamin Franklin,' and with Beveridge's 'Marshall'
. . So industrious and conscientious is Mr. Fuess in his search for ma-
terial of all kinds, that he comes nearer to producing a new portrait than
any one would have believed possible. It is such a biography as we seldom
see, and for at least our generation it may safely be pronounced definitive."
-Allan Nevins in the "Saturday Review of Literature."
LEONARD WOOD, by Hermann Hagedorn.
"The stage of American public life has not contained many figures of
grand tragedy, in fact the few there were can almost be counted on the
fingers of one hand, but one of these figures was assuredly that of Leonard
Wood. His career had the element of tragedy in that he had to contend
with physical suffering and a series of public disappointments any one of
which would have broken a lesser man. But it was grand in its accomplish-
ment and by virtue of his mountainous strength of character.
"Mr. Hagedorn's life is thus a work which belongs on the shelves of
every well-selected library. It is a picture of an inspiring character and
it is also the history of a little understood epoch."-Henry Cabot Lodge in
"Books."









PASSED BY
HALF WAY, by Cecil Roberts.
Here is another of those good books that somehow or other do not
"catch on," and so miss the attention received far more abundantly by
poorer books.
Cecil Roberts, war correspondent, novelist, lecturer, and editor writes
his autobiography from his fifteenth to his thirty-fifth year. Should the
rest of his life equal the first half in interest, volume two will be another
gem.
Much of the book deals with the war, where and when he was at-
tached to the Navy and Air Force as well as to the Infantry. Perhaps the
greatest reporting here is his account of the abdication of the Kaiser.
After the war, Roberts came to America to lecture. His opinion of
us is more favorable than that of some of the recent lecturers, but the
chapter "chaos" is a bitter comment on our civilization.

RECENT FICTION
THE LOVING SPIRIT, by Daphne DuMaurier.
The granddaughter of George DuMaurier of "Trilby" fame has writ-
ten this first novel of the Cornish coast. The story deals with four genera-
tions of a family. Rebecca West characterizes the book as a "Whopper of
a romantic novel in the vein of Emily Bronte."
SILHOUETTE OF MARY ANN, by J. E. Buckrose.
"Lovers of the immortal Maggie Tulliver and Mrs. Poyser, of Hetty
Sorrel and Romola, do not need to be convinced that the life story of the
woman who created these characters is one of charm, poignancy and
passion. George Eliot was a modern, living before her time in the most
aggressive early Victorian days."-Cover.
NEW ENGLAND HOLIDAY, by Charles Allen Smart.
"Over the week-end of Washington's Birthday, five girls and seven
young men meet at a house party, in the country south of Boston. Each
of them, in his own way, has arrived at an emotional crisis; and under the
gaiety and high spirits of the party runs the subtle, dramatic current of
human relationship. The story is ingeniously and attractively told; each
of the fourteen characters, including the mother and father of the host,
writes a chapter in turn."-Cover.

OTHER NEW BOOKS
PERE MARQUETTE, by Agnes Repplier.
A biography of the French Jesuit missionary to the American Indians.
SAILING THE SKIES, by Malcolm Ross.
A description of gliding and gliders, with a practical gliding manual
as appendix.









NARRATIVES OF THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA, by A. W. Law-
rence and Jean Young.
The purpose of this book is to present, in a form available to the gen-
eral reader, the more important documents descriptive of first steps in the
discovery of America.
THE COMPLETE SKI RUNNER, by Arnold Lunn.
This is a manual of ski running, and as such treats of the various
turns, rather than a complete manual of skiing which would have chapters
on jumping.
KNUTE ROCKNE: MAN BUILDER, by Harry A. Stuhldreher.
A life of Notre Dame's great coach by one of his most famous pupils.
STARRY ADVENTURE, by Mary Austin.
A novel of a young man sent to New Mexico to regain his health. Re-
markable for its description of scenes and life in the Southwest.
BAYBERRY LANE, by Sara Ware Bassett.
Another of her Cape Cod novels.
ENDLESS RIVER, by Felix Riesenberg.
"In 'Endless River' I assume intelligence on the part of the reader.
I take it as my function to evoke the flow of ideas and emotions. My aim
has been to create a novel of movement in the mind of the reader. To this
end I kill off characters as they attain their ends, and I abandon subjects
when they cease to be important."-Author.
SUSAN SPRAY, by Sheila Kaye-Smith.
Praised by the critics as her best book since "Joanna Golden," a novel of
a woman religious leader of an earlier day.
MARTIN'S SUMMER, by Vicki Baum.
Young Dr. Martin Heil becomes a swimming instructor, while waiting
for news of his invention. Bad weather, small fees, and consequent hunger
were nothing compared to the attentions his superb physique drew from
the women guests. The end of the season comes as an immense relief.
Martin has a brighter financial future in sight and a fiancee.
LETTERS OF A HOOFER TO HIS MA, by Jack Donahue.
Letters home by the star of "Sonny."
GOD HAVE MERCY ON US, by William T. Scanlon.
One of the winners in the American Legion contest for novels on the
War.
MRS. FISCHER'S WAR, by Henrietta Leslie.
A novel of a family, part of whom fought with the Allies and part
with the Central Powers.
SIXTH JOURNEY, by Alice Grant Rosman.
A modern version of the Cinderella story.




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