Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00035
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: October 1931
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00035
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text


THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire
Durham, New Hampshire 0- -
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at D A ew Hampshire
under the act of August 24, 1912"
Volume Seven, Number 1 Monthly fr. hOct {]Mt ie

OCTOBER, 1931

OLD QUEBEC
SHADOWS ON THE ROCK, by Willa Cather.
"Pictorially rich 'Shadows on the Rock' is dramatically somewhat
thin. Its excellence must be discovered not in the weight and thrust of the
major events to which it refers but in the idyllic or pathetic touches which
make up the flesh of the actual story.
"The method (of this book) is, in a sense, the reverse of that in the
pioneer novels. Whereas there Miss Cather puts into relief the heroic
qualities which give dimension to the common lives of her chief person-
ages, here she represents, with learned and delicate precision, the daily
existence of Quebec."-Carl Van Doren in "Books."

WINNER AND RUNNER UP
BROTHERS IN THE WEST, by Robert Raynolds.
THE OPENING OF A DOOR, by George Davis.
The award of the Harper Prize Novel for 1931-32 was given to
"Brothers in the West." The judges were Carl Van Doren, Ellen Glasgow,
and Bliss Perry. The story goes, that "Brothers in the West" received the
vote of two of the judges and "The Opening of the Door" received the
third vote.
The books differ in all respects. "Brothers in the West" is a tale of
the frontier, with touches of Paul Bunyan about it-"The Opening of a
Door" narrates the life of a Canadian family which has moved to Chicago.

MORE ABOUT THE DEALS
A WHITE BIRD FLYING, by Bess Streeter Aldrich.
The third generation of Deals, which is as well the third generation
of Nebraskans, struggles against different forces. This is the book of
Laura Deal and Allen Reinmueller, now Rinemiller, the grandchildren of
Grandma Deal and Christine Reinmuetler.
0 o PERIODICAL

V. 1. 1 .I





SMART AND SOPHISTICATED
HARD LINES, by Ogden Nash.
DEATH AND TAXES, by Dorothy Parker.
"Hard Lines," by Ogden Nash, and "Death and Taxes," by Dorothy
Parker, may sound like the further cries of a world-wide depression, but
one glance at the contents of these books will dispel the prevalent gloom.
One author supplements the other with verse equally subtle and abrupt.
In fact Ogden Nash includes Dorothy Parker in his dedicatory note, the
only serious part of the volume. Dorothy Parker continues to write such
meaningful titles as "Ballade of Unfortunate Mammals," and lines like
this:
Drink and dance and laugh and lie
Love the reeling midnight through,
For tomorrow we may die
(But, alas, we never do)


PLANNING: RUSSIAN AND AMERICAN
NEW RUSSIA'S PRIMER, by M. Ilin.
BUSINESS ADRIFT, by Wallace B. Donham.
The first book describes and illustrates Russia's Five Year Plan, and
the second suggests a plan suitable for America as a capitalistic country.
Both plans have the same end in view, the abolishment of poverty. Dean
Donham suggests the final solution may well lie between the two, while
Ilin is certain that the Russian plan will be adopted finally.
Ilin's book, written to explain the Five Year Plan to Russian children,
is a model of clear exposition and picturization.


AN AUTHOR HERE AND THERE
JOHN MISTLETOE, by Christopher Morley.
This is a book for people who like reminiscences of an adventurous
life such as John Mistletoe-that is, Christopher Morley-has had. True,
the adventures are of the quiet kind, chiefly among books and bookshops
and authors, but they are none the less interesting for that. The book is
full of whimsical, humorous anecdotes of people and places. It is worth
reading for the text of Mistletoe's will alone, even were there no other
choice bits to be found.


A GREAT SCIENTIST
THE LIFE, LETTERS AND LABOURS OF FRANCIS GALTON, by Carl
Pearson.
The Library has purchased this four volume biography of one of the
great English scientists. Francis Galton worked in so many fields this
book should be of interest to most persons.








Pearson writes . but the reader who follows my story to the end
may possibly see that the ramification of Galton's methods are producing
a renascence in innumerable branches of science, which will be as epoch-
making in the near future as the Darwinian theory of evolution was in
biology from 1860 to 1880, and which has encountered and will encounter
no less bigoted opposition from both the learned and the lay. To work for
that Galtonian renascence has been the writer's main aim in life . "


DOWN EAST AND UP ALONG
LETTERS FROM FRATERNITY, by A. L. McCorrison.
A series of letters from a Maine farmer to Ben Ames Williams. Many
of the letters are about hunting and fishing, a few are about life as he
knew it as a boy in the same town, and the rest describe his daily life on
the farm.
A book for those who like to read of life in the country, and of char-
acters whose outstanding trait is peace of mind.


A WIDE ROAMING YANKEE
A YANKEE IN PATAGONIA, by Robert and Katherine Barrett.
Few books have been written under more mechanical difficulties as
the authors relate in their introduction. The scene of the struggle of get-
ting the book on paper was laid chiefly in Cornish, New Hampshire.
Chace of Massachusetts lived in Patagonia for thirty years, instead of
the few days he intended to live there. This is a book of his observations
of nature, and the sheep industry there, since he herded sheep most of the
time. Running through the tale is a most provocative mention of "Tierra
Del." One hopes the authors will go there next to try to find Chace's
double, and then write about him.
This book is a gift to the Library from the authors, both of whom
have given generously to the Library before.


WHY CLOSED STACKS?
The Library has been forced to close the stacks for two reasons. The
first is that the constant growth in books makes it impossible for us to
arrange the various classes in a logical and consistent manner. The sec-
ond reason is that books cannot be kept in order unless they are removed
from, and replaced on the shelves by persons with at least a slight training
in library methods.
Books will be obtained in the future by leaving a call slip at the charg-
ing desk, where the books will be delivered.
Those who wish to use the stacks for special work will be granted
permits to do so by the Librarian.








OTHER NEW BOOKS
JAMES FENIMORE COOPER, by Henry Walcott Boynton.
A book on Cooper as a man, rather than a critical book on Cooper's
work as an author.
ALL PASSION SPENT, by Virginia Sackville-West.
"All responsibilities over, all passion spent, she looks at the strenuous
affair of living in perspective, enjoying a pleasant intimacy with her true
self who has been pushed aside by the exigencies of life." Thus did Lady
Slane feel at eighty-eight.
THREE PAIRS OF SILK STOCKINGS, by Panteleimon Romanof.
A novel of life of the educated classes under the Communist regime.
Typically Russian in tone.
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, by Warwick Deeping.
A perfect best seller, title and all.
THE COLONEL'S DAUGHTER, by Richard Aldington.
A bitter satire on English country life after the war-yet with some
humor.
IF I WERE YOU, by P. G. Wodehouse.
His latest.
JOHN HENRY, by Roark Bradford.
Tales of the Negro Paul Bunyan.
HATTER'S CASTLE, by Archibald Joseph Cronin.
The first novel selected by the British Book Society for its members.
A long novel in which a father terrorizes his family until all leave and he is
himself brought to ruin. Melodramatic in spots, but no one can miss the
feeling of impending tragedy.
OFFICIAL SYSTEM OF CONTRACT BRIDGE.
Culbertson's greatest rival. This system, its proponents claim is
easier and more logical.
THE GUARDED ROOM, by J. S. Fletcher.
The latest by this reliable mystery writer.
HUMANISM AND AMERICA, by Norman Foerster.
Humanism by one of its prophets.
THE YOUNG MRS. MEIGS, by Elizabeth Corbett.
Mrs. Meigs at eighty. "Her two great battles in this story are to help
Cecile, her granddaughter, who is deeply and impractically in love, and to
avoid living with her children.
THE BLANKET OF .THE DARK, by John Buchan.
England in the time of Henry the Eighth. Another good historical
novel.
THE MENTOR.
The Library has purchased a complete file of this periodical, which is
so valuable for its monographs on all the arts.
FINCH'S FORTUNE, by Mazo de la Roche.
The third book of the White Oaks of Jalna. Finch inherits Adeline's
fortune.




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