Title: Library lantern
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00034
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: June 1931
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00034
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."
Volume Six, Number 9 Monthly from October to June

JUNE, 1931

UNDERTONES
OUT OF SOUNDINGS, by H. M. Tomlinson.
"Out of Soundings"-far out at sea where the depth is too great to
be plumbed. The title suits these essays. Whether writing of the talkies,
or a brown owl, or war books, Tomlinson has the air of being in touch
with something deeper. The distinguished quality of his work, his beau-
tiful, clear prose, have come to be recognized widely and no one will be
disappointed with this latest collection of his essays.

ART CRITICISM AND APPRECIATION
MEN OF ART, by Thomas Craven.
MEN AND MEMORIES, RECOLLECTIONS, 1872-1900, by William
Rothenstein.
"Men of Art" and "Men of Memories" are both outstanding books.
Each is readable, vital and highly individual.
Thomas Craven covers the period from Giotto through the phases of
Impressionism to the present time. His decided and fiery judgments as
to which artists are worth while and which shall be ruthlessly discarded
are prejudiced but they are for that reason more satisfactory to meet up
with than wishy-washy digests of century-old valuations. At least you
can agree heartily or disagree violently with him. In non-technical lan-
guage Craven shows what the artistic heritage was for each man. Then
he shows what the man tried to accomplish with form, color, brush work.
Against the background of his time each artist comes to life with surpris-
ing vigor, struggles, experiments, and achieves.
"Men and Memories" is more restricted in its scope than "Men of
Art" as the title suggests. There is no doubt that Sir William Rothestein
is a singularly delightful person with a gift for friendship as well as for
painting. It seems hardly possible that one man could know so many
almost legendary characters: Whistler, Aubrey Beardsley, Beerbohm,
Verlaine, Oscar Wilde, Sargent, Swinburne, George Moore, Gordon Craig,
O0.o

U. SL
U. to. tO.








and others. In writing his memories Rothenstein puts himself in the
background and so we have much new material on these most brilliant
lights of London and Paris of the late nineteenth century.

A PIONEER NUN
MPRE MARIE OF THE URSULINES, by Agnes Repplier.
Three centuries ago, Pere Le Jeune, a Jesuit priest in Quebec, wrote
to France pleading for money and nuns to start a convent and orphanage
for young girls in New France. Fortunate indeed for the cause that such
an exception woman as Mere Marie of the Ursuline Convent in Tours was
chosen to undertake the great adventure fostered by Mine. de la Peltrie.
Much of the early history of Quebec is of necessity included in Mere Marie's
story, but Miss Repplier never allows one to entirely lose sight of the in-
trepid woman who contributed so much towards the history of New France.
The first and second convents burn, yet Mere Marie, undaunted by lack
of funds, went ahead with her plans for a larger and better one. French
Canadian and Indian girls were both admitted to the convent and taught
the amenities of life. Thirty years she labored in Quebec and died in her
seventy-first year with the satisfaction of an accomplished purpose and a
great work well-founded.

CANADIAN LITERATURE
A HANDBOOK OF CANADIAN LITERATURE, by Vernon B. Rhoden-
izer.
Dr. Rhodenizer, professor of English Language and Literature at
Acadia University, has succeeded in presenting a valuable guide to Cana-
dian literature. He treats separately the various types of literature and gives
a critical estimate of the contributions of representatives in these fields.
In his opinion, the highest artistic level in Canadian literature has been
reached by its poets and he points out why the very popular Robert Service
is rarely to be considered as a true poet. The Canadian novel and drama
suffer alike from too much romance still demanded by the Canadian public.
The short story has a more realistic trend and he finds the status of non-
fiction satisfactory with a promising outlook.

ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING
THE BARRETTS OF WIMPOLE STREET, by Rudolf Besier.
This play, one of the greatest successes of the current New York
season, recreates the frail poetess and her dashing suitor both charmingly
and faithfully. There is both comedy and tragedy,-a vivacious sister
and a cruel father; a silly cousin and six stupid brothers. And there is
Robert Browning, "who never turned his back but marched breast for-
ward," right into the fortress at 50 Wimpole Street, and carried off its most
guarded treasure.








EAST AND WEST
THE GRASS ROOF, by Younghill Kang.
The autobiography of a Korean boy whose childhood was spent under
the old regime. Confucianism and the classes were his intellectual diet,
but when Japan annexed Korea he decided to have a Western education, and
walked three hundred miles for it. He was only eleven and a half at this
time. With the outbreak of the World War his admiration for Western
civilization turned to disgust, but he realized its practical value and
eventually attained his goal of a college education in America.

PERSHING'S BOOK
MY EXPERIENCES IN THE WORLD WAR, by General John J. Persh-
ing.
Pershing's long-awaited, and long-delayed book is now at the Library.
Only the first volume has been published serially in the newspapers.
The most influential reviews of this book that have as yet appeared
are those by General Harboard in the New York Herald-Tribune "Books,"
and by Capt. Liddell Hart in the New York Times "Book Review Maga-
zine." Both reviews appeared April 26, one heaps praise on the work, and
the other condemns it completely.

A MOST USEFUL SET
Through the kindness of Mr. C. H. Haynes, Manager of the Dover-
Rochester District, the Library has been given current issues of the
telephone directories of the large cities of the country, and a set of di-
rectories for the New Hampshire Exchanges. These are available at all
times in the Reference Room.

A MINISTER ON RELIGION
THE PROCESSION OF THE GODS, by Gaius Glenn Atkins.
Dr. Atkins, Professor of Homeletics at Auburn Theological Seminary
is known as an excellent preacher. He now writes a "story of religion,"
much different from those written by non-theologians.
"If the work I set for myself has been even partially achieved, it must
suggest that the unities of religion are far more significant than its dif-
ferences. No one of the great religions has a monopoly of truth or worth.
Cultures and races determine the outstanding forms religion has taken.
There has been a far greater interchange of influence than the histories of
religion commonly admit. Even the most advanced religions have in them
today remnants and survivals of the oldest faiths. The commanding
experiences have furnished the moulds in which all faith has been cast.
There are gleams of high insight in primitive faith, there is a murk of
superstition in the most fully developed faiths. No religion may claim a
monopoly of the Eternal, every religion has had its calendared saints.
There are no definitions of it save the whole of what it has been; it is not
a perfect deposit like life, it is always a "becoming." There is no region
of life in which there is less room for prideful intolerance."-Preface.








A GOOD SUCCESS STORY
MY STORY, by Mary Roberts Rinehart.
"To women, I think, and also to most men, Mrs. Rinehart's story of
her life so far will be utterly absorbing, not only as the account of one of
the best known figures in American life, but also as a picture of our time
and country in a period which has seen startling changes. Mrs. Rinehart's
experience in all her varied capacities has given her a very unusual chance
to see and feel this half century, and her combination of intense emotion,
imagination and the objectivity she calls "journalistic" has made the most
of it."-Books.

MILLAY
FATAL INTERVIEW, by Edna St. Vincent Millay.
A series of fifty-two vigorous sonnets-at once lyrical and dramatic.
With the same sureness of touch that marked the delicious flippancies of
her earlier volumes Miss Millay manages the tragic-love theme. Here one
finds many of the earlier qualities of style: archaic diction, irregular but
effective meter, classical references, naive phrasing, striking imagery,
simplicity, but there has been a change in the poet. In none of her other
volumes has she looked so long and so intently at life; nor seen so clearly.

OTHER NEW BOOKS
THE ROAD BACK, by Erich Maria Remarque.
Remarque continues "All Quiet on the Western Front." The book
starts at the Armistice, and carries a group of German soldiers back to
civil life.
DAWN, by Theodore Dreiser.
Dreiser writes another installment of his autobiography. This book
carries him from childhood to his nineteenth year.
LIVING AUTHORS, by Dilly Tante.
This series of biographies fills a gap in reference work. Biographies
of dead authors are easy to locate, but biographies of 400 living authors,
most of them with photographs will be invaluable. The authors are ar-
ranged alphabetically, with a pronouncing index at the end of the book.
THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, by M. A. DeWolfe Howe.
The history of the Boston Symphony to 1931. This book brings up
to date the history written in 1914.
BEST COLLEGE VERSE, 1931, ed. by Jessie Rehder.
A college anthology. Many poems are by students of the University.
EARLY AMERICAN FURNITURE MAKERS, by Thomas H. Ormsbee.
"A glimpse of the conditions surrounding, and something of the
personality of these practitioners of the cabinet-making art."




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs