Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00032
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: April 1931
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00032
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text






THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning


Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Voume Six, Number 7 Monthly from October to June

APRIL, 1931

WHAT IS MAN?
THE SCIENCE OF LIFE, by H. G. Wells, Julian S. Huxley, and G. P.
Wells.
This work, the second of the triology proposed by Mr. Wells, attempts
to do for biology what he did for history when he wrote his "Outline of
History." The third work, which is to appear later has to do with man's
relation to economics and morality. Anyone who has read the first two,
hopes the last will appear soon.
"The Science of Life" covers from all possible angles man's relation to
the biological sciences, with some geology added. We go from the amoeba to
Freud, and from genetics to psychical research. Even if what the books tell
us be false in part, we must marvel at any group of three men who can pre-
sent so much knowledge so reasonably. The authors collaborated so effi-
ciently that it is not possible for one not familiar with their previous work
to say that any one of them wrote a particular passage.
First we learn now our bodies work, from the embryo to death, then
the various classes of life are described, which leads to the book on evolu-
tion. Evolution is presented as a fact, with a following book giving ex-
planations. So on to books on the "History and Adventure of Life" and the
"Spectacle of Life."
The last three books are doubtless the most interesting to one not
trained in science. They are "Health and Disease," "Behaviour and
Thought," and the "Biology of the Human Race."
Here is some good reading for everybody. A lucky few will know
enough to like all of it. In the slang of the publishing world, Mr. Wells
has "done it again."



%. 4 *\0.1








THE CHILDREN'S ROOM
RED SHOES, by Katherine Ellis Barrett.
Thoughts of a little boy turned into poetry by his sister who is a New
Hampshire woman. The poems have a distinctive charm of their own and
are cleverly illustrated by Dorothy Fuller Odell.
THE BOLD DRAGOON AND OTHER GHOSTLY TALES, by Washing-
ton Irving.
Thrills and chuckles are in store for the boys and girls who read this
book.
THE FIRST PICTURE BOOK, by Mary Steichen Martin.
Twenty-four photographs of everyday things for baby to enjoy rec-
ognizing and to help him connect imagery with reality.
LIANG AND LO, by Kurt Wiese.
You will be just as surprised as these little boys were at what hap-
pened when the buffalo charged the dragon and the pictures will make you
laugh.
THE WEE MEN OF BALLYWOODEN, by Arthur Mason.
Mr. Mason must be on very good terms with the wee men or he would
not know so many things about them.
THE TALE OF LITTLE PIG ROBINSON, by Beatrix Potter.
When Little Pig Robinson starts off to market in Stymouth he does not
know of the exciting adventures in store for him and his very narrow es-
cape from the "Pound of Candles."
PETER POCKET'S LUCK, by May Justus.
Peter Pocket is a very poor little boy who lives with Granny Messer
in a cabin in Tennessee. But Peter is happy because he has Granny, his
fiddle, his Pickle Pup and his school friends.
THE ARK OF FATHER NOAH AND MOTHER NOAH, by Maud and
Miska Petersham.
A new version of the story of Noah's ark with many colored pictures.
RAMA: ,THE HERO OF INDIA, by Dhan Gopal Mukerji.
Mr. Mukerji has prepared this adaptation of the Ramayama especially
for English speaking children. The Ramayama is a long epic poem of
the life and deeds of Rama and almost every Hindu can recite from memory
the story of this great hero.
THE FIVE CHILDREN, by E. Nesbit.
This thick book contains three long stories and you do not want to miss
one of them, especially if you are not acquainted with the Psammead who
could grant wishes.
THE CAT WHO WENT TO HEAVEN, by Elizabeth Coatsworth.
An artist's love for his little cat almost spoils his great picture of
Buddha and the animals who were his friends. Buddha performs a
miracle and the outcast cat receives his blessing. Lynd Ward has drawn
some very fine pictures.








CONTEMPORARY ILLUSTRATORS OF CHILDREN'S BOOKS, by
Bertha E. Mahony and Elinor Whitney.
This is not a book for children but one which will interest everyone
who has come in contact with children's books and noted the very fine work
of the illustrators. The biographical material fills a long-felt need and the
examples of the work of these artists serve to show the wide range of pic-
torial art used to make the present day children's books so much more at-
tractive than those of a good many years ago.


TOWARD THE NEW PHILOSOPHY
THE ENDURING QUEST, by Harry Allen Overstreet.
Into the philosophic blackness in which we were plunged by nineteenth
century physics and biology, a few rays of light are beginning to shine.
There seems to be approaching a new age when science and philosophy
together will release us from the deadening effects of mechanistic thought
and open vistas of the creative possibilities of free minds. Electrons, says
Overstreet, are not the only reality, for reality is the sum-total of all points
of view, including that of mind. The human mind is a part of nature and
as such represents the most important part, because it is forever reaching
forward and making new combinations, producing something which was
not in the world before. It is even now creating a new philosophy of life
for those who wish to get beyond mechanism.


BURIED TREASURE
CORONADO'S CHILDREN, by J. Frank Dobie.
The Spaniard Coronado was the first white man to go treasure-hunt-
ing in the Southwest. From his day to ours his spiritual children have
carried on the quest, following old trails, old legends, old landmarks,
in search of the treasure which someone, at some time, knew to be there.
The fact that no one ever found anything only whetted the appetites of each
succeeding generation, and he who reads may still hunt clues if he feels
inclined. The stories of the seekers have been collected from local sources
and gathered into an exciting book of nearly four hundred pages.


AMERICANS IN PARIS
READER, I MARRIED HIM, by Anne Green.
Paris is a heaven and a haven for irresponsible people. The Douglass
family found living there with no resources but their charm as easy as
breathing. To be sure Catherine had a brief season of difficulty with
Gilbert Hunton. HIe tried to escape her and marry an heiress. She
straightway took advice from Nesta, the fortune teller, and his affection
returned. In fact he became so jealous, so fond, that Catherine wanted
to escape from such overwhelming love. Again Nesta was consulted.
The stern moralist will disapprove of the path of life being strewn
with primroses for such worthless people; the moralist-on-vacation will
enjoy these gay creatures and will be decidedly envious of their carefree
existence.








INTERNATIONALISM
I AMERICANS, by Salvador de Madariaga.
In a prefatory note the author thinks it wise to warn his readers that
"Americans" on the title page does not necessarily mean citizens of the
United States, and in one of the essays, he says "national prejudices may
be useful . provided prejudices-like dogs-are trained to behave. I
have tried to keep my own dogs asleep while I wrote this article. May I
ask the reader to keep an eye on his own while he reads it?"
The reader, if he has a fiercely American dog, may have to say "Down,
Fido, down" once or twice, but aside from that I think he will enjoy these
highly original articles on international cooperation.


A SECONDARY DEFENSE
Everyone, sooner or later, has the pleasure of a call from agents for
various subscription books or "sets"-to give them their common name.
Doubtless librarians receive such calls more frequently than others.
The American Library Association issues a quarterly called "Sub-
scription Books Bulletin." This publication is written by a group of li-
brarians who give their opinion, favorable or unfavorable, on "sets." The
"Bulletin" now has been published for over a year, hence many sets have
been described and valued. The field covered is extensive, from the En-
cyclopedia Britannica to some of the many collections of children's readings.
The Library will be glad to quote any such reviews over the telephone
if the agent is present. In any case "Subscriptions Books Bulletin" is
always available in the Librarian's office for consultation.


THE TIMES INDEX
The "New York Times" now has published its "Index," in a single vol-
ume, of 2,864 pages, weighing nine pounds. The "Index," like the bound
volumes, which we have as well, is printed on imperishable rag paper.
This Library will now have a complete and well-indexed record of
the affairs of the world from January 1, 1930.


GOOD MYSTERIES, OLD AND NEW
Abbott-About the Murder of Geraldine Foster.
Christie-Murder of Roger Ackroyd.
Fielding-Net Around Joan Ingilby.
Fletcher-Middle Temple Murder.
Ganpat-Three R's.
Keeler-Voice of the Seven Sparrows.
Miller-Colfax Bookplate.
Orr-Dartmouth Murders.
Rinehart-The Door.
Sayers-Whose Body?




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