Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00030
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: February 1931
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Volume Six, Number 5 Monthly from October to June

FEBRUARY, 1931

NEW HAMPSHIREIANA
NINETY YEARS AT THE ISLES OF SHOALS, by Oscar Laighton.
"Being the only one left of the Laighton family at the Isles of Shoals,
I have been urged, by the many visitors here every summer to write what
I can remember of my life covering ninety years on these islands.
"The only merit to my modest yarn is that it is a true story. Possibly
this may make it of some interest to lovers of these beautiful islands."
-Oscar Laighton.
"Uncle Oscar" is too modest. This is a lively and entertaining auto-
biography, with much of the life of Celia Thaxter as well.

THE INDIANS OF THE WINNIPESAUKEE AND PEMIGEWASSET
VALLEYS, by Mary A. Proctor.
The story of the Indians near Franklin, N. H., by one who has one
of the finest collections of Indian relics in the State. What Miss Proctor
writes of the Indians is always interesting, but more interesting is how she
or members of her family, found various gems of the collection.
The Proctor influence on collectors of Indian Relics in this State is
widespread. The one who writes this remembers very clearly finding a piece
of pottery for the author's brother on one of the camping grounds de-
scribed in this book.

THE NEW BRIDGE
The Library has the Report of the Newington-Durham Bridge Com-
mission.

FREUD
CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS, by Sigmund Freud.
Freud, in an able translation by Joan Riviere, has much to say that is
provocative of thought, possibly of argument.
A newborn child does not recognize himself as a thing apart. His
crib and his toe are all one and the same thing to him. Later he makes

$36 A.








distinction; but he never forgets the former feeling, the feeling of oneness
with the universe. Those who speak of their "oceanic feeling." (Their
feeling that they are a part with God) are only seeking a return to their
earlier state of mind.
With this idea of ego in mind, Freud turns to take up religion, "the
mass delusion that saves many individuals from neurosis"; loneliness; love;
and "the consciousness of guilt." In a way that is fascinating and not in-
frequently rather convincing, he deals with these "discontents of civiliza-
tion."
He closes the book with the frank statement that he diagnoses but
does not prescribe.

HOW FATE WORKS
THE GLORY OF THE NIGHTINGALES, by Edwin Arlington Robinson.
"Be sorry for an ominous example." This line from "The Glory of
the Nightingales" might well serve as the motif of the entire poem.
Nightingale loved Agatha; but Malory took her from him,-from Nightin-
gale who would never be second in anything. The story of the poem is the
story of the hatred between the men-long afterwards; the story of the
end of Nightingale and the story of his gift that was cruel and kind, Night-
ingale, the ominous example!
With characteristic blank verse and with a lucidity of style that has
not always marked Robinson's work, the poet tells the story: a logical
story of the working of the minds of two great men. And once more
Robinson shows himself "the poet of futility."

AMERICAN ANTIQUES
EARLY AMERICAN SILVER, by Louise Avery.
To the lover or collector of old silver, this book is at once an inspira-
tion and an irritation. It makes one eager to examine every detail of pieces
already acquired through either inheritance or purchase, and arouses re-
gret for the opportunities one missed for securing what might have been a
rare and perhaps unique piece. Miss Avery traces the chronological de-
velopment of silver in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and some
of the Southern States, and then devotes the rest of her book to a consider-
ation of the evolution of the principal forms of early American silver. The
book is well supplied with fine illustrations of the work of many Colonial
craftsmen.

AGAIN SCIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY
THE MYSTERIOUS UNIVERSE, by Sir James Jeans.
"There is a widespread conviction that the new teachings of astronomy
and physical science are destined to produce an immense change on our
outlook on the universe as a whole, and on our views as to the significance
of human life. The question at issue is ultimately one for philosophic dis-
cussion, but before the philosophers have a right to speak, science ought
first to be asked to tell all she can as to ascertained facts and provisional
hypotheses. Then, and then only, may discussion legitimately pass into the
realms of philosophy." Preface.
Sir James says also in his preface that this book is designed as a se-
quel for "The Universe Around Us".








A USEFUL BIBLIOGRAPHY
A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SOCIAL SURVEYS, by Allen Eaton.
This publication of the Russell Sage Foundation fills a long-felt need.
Here are listed social surveys, according to the broadest meaning of the
term, by fields of work, sub-divisions of these fields, and by location. 2775
surveys made before 1928 are included.


THE AUTHOR'S SON
THE REDLAKES, by Francis Brett Young.
When Jim Redlake is eleven years old, his mother takes him to his
grandparents at Thorpe Folville, because she cannot endure life with her
author husband and does not want him to have Jim. The little boy grows
up here, and becoming fast friends with his grandfather is persuaded to
study medicine to carry on the latter's practice. Jim falls in love with the
beautiful Lady Cynthia Essendine, who refuses him and marries Jim's best
friend. The death of his grandfather, coupled with Cynthia's marriage to
Julian leads to his impulsive visit to the old family home "Trewern" and
to his departure for South Africa. The country and his work have a strong
appeal; then war comes and he enlists. Just before his ship sails he meets
Catherine Malthus, a former school friend and he has to choose between
her and Cynthia when he returns to England.


THE BLUE GRASS COUNTRY
THE LIMESTONE TREE, by Joseph Hergesheimer.
"The Limestone Tree" is the history of an American family, and
further, the history of the State of Kentucky. Beginning with Gabriel
Sash, a Long Hunter of the early days, and Nancy Abel, his wife, whom
he soon deserts, Hergesheimer starts an interesting narrative which he
carries almost to the present. This book has been called "the most dis-
tinguished novel of a distinguished career" and is being compared to "The
Three Black Pennys".

MRS. WHARTON IN HER BEST VEIN
CERTAIN PEOPLE, by Edith Wharton.
With a range of several centuries in time, and thousands of miles of
space, these short stories run the gamut of the emotions as well. Mystery,
horror, pathos, frustrated love, in turn are treated in Mrs. Wharton's
superb style. Though all the stories are notable we think "After Hoblein"
stands above the rest, and that it will take its place with the greatest of
short stories in English.

ADVENTURE IN GUATEMALA
STAYING WITH RELATIONS, by Rose Macaulay.
Though not up to the standard of her best novels this is a diverting
tale of an English family who pursue art and archaeology in the Guate-
malan forest. A villain, a treasure hunt, and a real estate agent add to the
fun.








NORWAY
VAGABONDS, by Knut Hamsun.
The story of "Vagabonds" is tedious; the backgrounds (Norwegian)
are interesting if you like raw ugliness. Edevart, August, and others are
men and women of some personal charm and ability-but ships without
rudders. And then there are the boats that never leave the harbor.
Hamsun tells his story from the point-of-view of each group; then fearing
that we have missed the point, he has Edevart the Vagabond and his stay-
at-home brother talk over the situation. And thus we are told, by weary
repetition, nothing more startling than the fact that some people are cut
out to be vagabonds and some are cut out to be stay-at-homes-in habita-
tion, occupation, and love. Hamsun has written much better books.


A GREAT LAWYER
MAY IT PLEASE THE COURT, by James M. Beck.
This volume is primarily intended for members of the bar, students
of constitutional law, of jurisprudence, and for those intelligent voters
generally interested in public affairs. The reader will find in this book a
description of the Supreme Court in its Golden Era and of the Court in
this later period of steam and electricity; a discussion of the Constitution
as a living organism susceptible of indefinite development; a defense of the
Eighteenth amendment; Mr. Beck's part concerning the "Myers Case" and
the "Northern Securities Case", each of which excited wide attention a
generation ago and which remain a notable landmark in American juris-
prudence. Few lawyers in America have argued more cases involving the
Constitution, thus helping to shape the structure of our government, than
has Mr. Beck.


OTHER NEW BOOKS
SOBER TRUTH, by Margaret Barton and Osbert Sitwell.
The compilers have presented the queer characters and happenings
of the nineteenth century. The selections are chiefly English, and vary
from Tom Thumb to Jack the Ripper.
The most interesting introduction tells us the book was written to
prove that the Victorian Age had strange undercurrents.
TORTURED CHINA, by Hallett Abend.
The "New York Times" correspondent writes with the thesis that
other nations must act if China is to get on her feet.

MAGIC SPADES, by R. V. D. Magoffin and Emily C. Davis.
This non-technical book gives the story of archaeology in the Old
World and the New. One chapter heading is, "Where Garden Spades were
made of Gold".




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