Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00029
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: January 1931
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00029
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Volume Six, Number 4 Monthly from October to June

JANUARY, 1931

TRENCHANT CRITICISM
UNIVERSITIES-American, English, German, by Abraham Flexner.
Members of the Faculty will be especially interested in Dr. Flexner's
new book. He brings to his problem a wealth of experience, as a one
time member of the General Education Board, the Rhodes Trust, and as an
observer of German and English universities.
First he explains his concept of a modern university: one devoted to
the conservation of past knowledge, the increase of systematic knowledge,
and the training of students above the secondary level. With this basis of
criticism in mind, the German universities fare well, Oxford and Cam-
bridge not quite so well (tho' Dr. Flexner was evidently impressed with
the cultural aspects of both places), while American universities lag far
behind.
The book is devoted chiefly to American universities, and Dr. Flexner
certainly brings into the cold light of critical analysis some of the weakest
aspects of our higher education, particularly the overdevelopment of "serv-
ice" or "trade school" courses. Morever the book is not confined to general-
ities. He cites Harvard School of Business Administration, Teachers' Col-
lege of Columbia, Chicago, and Johns Hopkins as examples of one or an-
other shortcoming.
Our best law and medical schools are not placed in the "service" cate-
gory which raises the delicate question: Where is the line to be drawn be-
tween the "service" school or department, and one that legitimately be-
longs to an institution of true higher learning? Dr. Flexner says that
Home Study Courses, Schools of Business, Journalism, Home Economics,
Extension and Home Study Courses do not belong in a true university, yet
he admits law, medicine and agriculture. By implication his chief basis of
discrimination is one of age and tradition. This is the frankest and most
stimulating work on American higher education in several years.
Oao








CHIEFLY JANE ADDAMS
THE SECOND TWENTY YEARS AT HULL HOUSE, by Jane Addams.
This might well be a partial autobiography. We learn little of Hull
House, but much of the various causes in which Miss Addams is or has
been interested, from woman suffrage to world peace.
The reader feels that Hull House is what it is because its founder always
has taken her many rebuffs with a philosophic humor.

BYRD'S BOOK
LITTLE AMERICA, by Admiral Richard E. Byrd.
This book is needed to answer the many questions raised by Admiral
Byrd's lecture or by the moving pictures of the Expedition. The scientific
results are to be published later in four volumes. LITTLE AMERICA is
the story of the way of life in the Antarctic.

RUSSIA
HUMANITY UPROOTED, By Maurice Hindus.
Dr. John Dewey, in his introduction to this book, writes: "There is
hardly a book in existence that affords more material for hearty damnation
of Russia if one merely selects passages with that end in view. But there
is also a dispassionate and compassionate account of all the factors that
have fired the imaginative ardor of the most devout adherents of the revo-
lution. There is a picture of a large section of humanity uprooted, torn
loose from its old bearings, and striving with both fanatical madness and
sublime fervor to create a new humanity rooted in a new earth."

ADVENTURE EAST AND WEST
THE LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER, By Francis Yeats-Brown.
An English subaltern tells the story of his life between 1905 and the
present. Yeats-Brown's activities are manifold, hence the title,-soldier
in India and the World War, prisoner in Turkey, and in times of peace
polo player, pig sticker, and student of Oriental philosophy.
Yeats-Brown guided Lowell Thomas in his tour of India. The Li-
brary has THE LAND OF THE BLACK PAGODA, which is Thomas's
book of that journey.

TO SMOKE OR NOT TO SMOKE
TOBACCO, by W. L. Mendenhall.
This little volume of the Harvard Health Talks will not reform either
smokers or non-smokers, but it tells a lot of interesting things about the
physiological effects of tobacco, and about the relative merits of the best
known brands of cigarettes.








A GOOD STORY
RHODODENDRUM PIE, by Margery Sharp.
It was the general opinion that all the Laventies were clever, original,
and occasionally disagreeable, but Ann Laventie knew in her secret soul
that she was not up to the rest of her family. She felt it a strain to be bril-
liant, although happily she found out that a dreamy look, produced by the
eyebrows, often served instead of an epigram. More and more she was
drawn to people like the Gayfords who attended Flower Shows and be-
lieved in Marriage. But what an unheard of thing for a Laventie to marry
a man whose sole admiration among the modern poets was for Kipling!
Alas, she chose apple or cherry when she might have had rhododendrum
pie.


IN DEFENCE OF HAPPINESS
IN DEFENCE OF SENSUALITY, by John Cowper Powys.
Following close upon Wolf Solent and The Meaning of Culture, Powys'
new book gathers many threads from the earlier ones and weaves them
into a provocative, imaginative, beautiful expression of his philosophy of
life. Briefly, his thesis is that happiness is the aim of life, and that it can
be found only in loneliness, by exploring the sub-human and superhuman
reaches of one's consciousness. The term "sensuality" is used because it
enables the author "to proceed from rock-bottom upwards." The philos-
ophy is one which will appeal only to certain natures, but the book ought
to make everyone more aware of the beauty that lurks around him.


UNHONORED AND UNSUNG
THOMAS HOLLEY CHIVERS, Friend of Poe, by S. Foster Damon.
Mr. Damon's biography is the first full-length study of the strange
personality, and stranger poetry, of this 19th century Georgia doctor,
whose name has been known only to a few scholars and collectors. That
he was more than a name to several later poets is quite adequately demon-
strated by Mr. Damon, who shows how Chivers' work influenced not only
that of Poe, his friend and critic, but also that of Swinburne, Rossetti,
and Kipling. Chivers' poetry is an amazing mixture of the sublime and
the ridiculous-he coined new words, invented meters and stanza-forms,
and "produced some ultra-modern, hypnotic words which nobody else
could have written, and which today have a permanent value." Mr. Da-
mon's conclusion is that there is much of real poetry and beauty in the un-
evenness of Chivers' productions, and that he has a place in the ranks of
poets "much higher than the world has ever realized." The book itself is
very readable and a worthy contribution to the history of American litera-
ture and men of letters.








NEW EDITIONS
The Library has three new editions of well-known and well-liked
books. First is MOBY DICK, illustrated by Rockwell Kent. The illustra-
tions, since Kent is a famous navigator as well as an artist, make this great
sea story even more vivid. The other two editions are the Centenary Edi-
tion of Emily Dickinson's poems, and the Complete Edition of the poems
of Robert Frost.


NEW CHILDREN'S BOOKS
LITTLE SONGS OF LONG AGO and OUR OLD NURSERY RHYMES,
Harmonized by Alfred Moffat, and Illustrated by H. Willebeck LeMair.
Two charming books from which the children will enjoy singing.
Each volume includes the words and music for thirty songs. There is just
one song on a page and on the corresponding page is a delightful picture
by Mr. LeMair illustrating the song. These books are gifts of Mr. Robert
Barrett.

FRAWG, by Annie Vaughan Weaver
The story of a little Alabama piccaninny and his family, not to men-
tion Buckeye, the yellow dog, and the other animals.

THE TWILIGHT OF MAGIC, by Hugh Lofting.
This is not a Dolittle story but a tale of the Middle Ages and the part
which the magic shell plays in the lives of Giles and Anne and how it helps
the king.

THE BOY SCOUT YEAR BOOK 1930.
Stories for many a winter night, and some new jokes, too.

THE INDIAN TWINS, by Lucy F. Perkins.
You will like Beaver Boy and Pigeon just as much as the other twins
and they have many exciting adventures.

THE YELLOW KNIGHT OF OZ, by Ruth P. Thompson.
There are always shouts of delights at the arrival of a new Oz book
and Sir Hokus of Pokes won't disappoint anyone.

TOBY TYLER, by James Otis.
A new illustrated copy of this old favorite. It is the account of Toby's
ten weeks with an old-fashioned circus.

AMELIARANNE KEEPS SHOP, by Constance Heward.
Jenny, Joey and Wee William would have missed the Squire's picnic
if Ameliaranne hadn't fooled the sailor thief.




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