Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00028
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: December 1930
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00028
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning
Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Volume Six, Number 3 Monthly from October to June

DECEMBER, 1930

ELIOT OF HARVARD
CHARLES W. ELIOT, by Henry James.
"The purpose of this book is to delineate his character, not to hallow
his memory or to chronicle all his achievements."
Mr. James, the nephew of the novelist, has doubtless written the defin-
itive biography of President Eliot. Both the Eliot family and Harvard
have given him free access to all papers, with no restrictions on how he
chose to use them. President Eliot affected American education more than
any other man for so many years that this book is a real contribution to
the history of education. This is also one of the best biographies published
this year.

AN EX-SENATOR SPEAKS
IN THE SENATE, by George Wharton Pepper.
Senators may be graded with reference to the actual contributions
they make to constructive legislation or according to the effectiveness of
their opposition to what others propose. But from whatever point senators
are viewed, there are those who understand how to get the office and keep
it; second, those who can discharge the duties of the office when they have
it, and third, the rare man who can do both these widely different things.
And Senator Pepper of Pennsylvania is one of those who early realized
how difficult it was to learn the technique of keeping an office, once at-
tained.
IN THE SENATE abounds in characters, deeds, and actions under
two administrations. It is a penetrating and discriminating political mem-
orabilia by one who serves faithfully his country. There is boldness of
thought, and acuteness of penetration of all phases of American domestic
politics and International Affairs that attest the sincerity of the resem-
blance. The problem for a senator who wants to serve the nation as well
as the state is one which only a few solve successfully. Senator Pepper
unquestionably had strived to serve the nation as a whole while at the
same time conserving the special or peculiar interests of his own state.

"PA..








BOOKS ON ART
An important collection of art books has been acquired lately. Thanks
to these books it is now possible to study completely, through the mediums
of reproductions-there are, all in all, more than two thousand of these-
the whole development of European art. From the Byzantine mosaics to
Rembrandt's Night Watch, all the great moments of culture are represent-
ed. If history of painting has been given the largest place, as having more
immediate appeal, architecture and sculpture are also well represented and
their study will help to put the pictures in their environment. These vol-
umes with Faure's "History of Art" or Cavalcaselle and Crow's "Italian
Painting" as reference books, will give all possible opportunities for study
or for recreation. They are written in French or German, but notices are
given in English. The German books show the whole development of
Italian painting; they come from the famous series "Klassiker der Kunst"
and the whole work of Giotto, Botticelli, Raphael, Titian and others are
shown in good reproductions. Less complete, but more diverse and attrac-
tive are the French volumes, which are given to the study of schools in-
stead of individuals; Egyptian art, French sculpture of the Middle Ages,
the Dutch school, are illustrated by the most typical examples. It is to be
hoped that most students will look at these volumes which must be consid-
ered as one of the most valuable cultural additions to the Library.


THE SOCIETY OF JESUS
THE POWER AND SECRETS OF THE JESUITS, by Rene Fulop-Miller.
"The present volume, therefore, does not profess to be the contribu-
tion of a professional historian to the history of the Jesuit Order, so much
as a picture of those human passions and dreams, achievements and fail-
ures, which have decided our modern culture, and a picture no less of those
factors of cunning, infamy, heroism, intrigue, power of persuasion, despot-
ism, sagacity and deception which have played their part in shaping the
present." Preface.
Thomas J. Page, U. S. N., wrote a better, and far more interesting
account of the theocratic state founded by the Jesuits in Paraguay in his
LA PLATA: THE ARGENTINE CONFEDERATION AND PARA-
GUAY. The Library has this book. Chapters 27-30 deal with Paraguay.


OUR TIMES: VOL. 3
PRE-WAR AMERICA, by Mark Sullivan.
"The virtue of the book lies in the relation between trivial things and
the main currents of American life. Of these currents Mr. Sullivan dis-
cusses four at some length in the present volume. The first is the creation
of a legal standard for business morals, which uses for material the insur-
ance scandals and the reforms of Charles E. Hughes. The second is harder








to define, but you may call it the energization of American life-it is that
excess of excitement about nearly everything which stemmed from Theo-
dore Roosevelt. The third is the attack on the "System" centering on the
railroad fight, and the fourth is the combination of money and science for
the public good in such an obscure (by this time) enterprise as the destruc-
tion of the hookworm." Books.



THE EVER VICTORIOUS

A YANKEE ADVENTURER, by Holger Cahill.

Frederick Townsend Ward of Salem, Mass., accomplished what most
have dreamed about. He created, out of Chinese peasants, an army whose
prowess and skill bore "Chinese" Gordon to fame.
Who would expect an account of the Tai Ping Rebellion to be so ex-
citing? Who were the Tai Pings? Ward is America's Rajah Brooke, save
that he did not survive to enjoy his conquests. What other American be-
came a mandarin, married a mandarin's daughter, and finally became a
Confucian Saint?
Another new book, good to read, in the same field is Dulles's THE OLD
CHINA TRADE. Reading either book makes the other better.



A NEW MUSIC COLLECTION
Mr. Robert Barrett of Cornish has recently given the Library the ten
volume set of Scribner's called THE IDEAL HOME MUSIC LIBRARY.
The publishers describe the set as follows:
"It is designed to provide almost inexhaustible material for the music
lover who desires to play or sing for his own amusement; it can also be
used for purposes of serious music study, as all piano compositions are in
the original keys, and in the exact form in which the composer composed
them. Wherever piano pieces or songs have been selected from operatic,
symphonic, or chamber music sources, such arrangements have been placed
in the form and keys most desirable for the use of the music lover."
Vol. 1. Classic and Romantic Piano Works.
Vol. 2. Modern Piano Compositions.
Vol. 3. Light Piano Pieces.
Vol. 4. Juvenile Piano Pieces and Piano Duets.
Vol. 5. Opera Selections for Piano.
Vol. 6. Dance Music for Piano.
Vol. 7. Sacred Music.
Vol. 8. Songs form the Operas.
Vol. 9. Sentimental Songs.
Vol. 10. Favorite Home Songs.








THE LETTERS OF A FAMOUS ADAMS
LETTERS OF HENRY ADAMS, 1858-1891.
A more human Henry Adams emerges from these letters than one
found in the EDUCATION. His charming personality, keen humor, and
lively comments capture the reader's interest from the beginning. While
a few letters deal with purely political matters, most of them are such as
a man writes to his friends, describing his travels in Europe and the
South Seas, or his adventures at home. A call on President Grant or the
Japanese ambassador becomes a lively affair when described by such a
pen, while his subtle jibes penetrate a vast range of subjects: from Eng-
lish dinners to American dinners, from geologists to missionaries, from
duchesses to South Sea queens, from cotillions to Samoan Siva dances.


LIFE ON A CANADIAN FRONTIER
ROCK AND SAND, by John Rathbone Oliver.
The north shore of the St. Lawrence, far below Quebec, is the scene
of Oliver's latest novel. He writes sympathetically of the habitants who
are continually struggling with a hostile soil and climate, sustained in
their hardships by the spiritual aid of their church and priest. Into this
barren land come summer visitors-American-and the clash between the
two groups forms the plot of the story. Though slightly colored by the
author's sympathy for the church and people of French Canada, it is a
very interesting and well written tale.

A GENTLEMAN AT WAR
MEMOIRS OF AN INFANTRY OFFICER, by Siegfried Sassoon.
"A country gentleman takes time between bomb-throwing to note the
changes in the seasons, to identify the birds and flowers, to watch the sky
for portents about the weather, to read, to think a great deal about Kent
and Sussex, even to hunt when occasion arose. The result is a book about
the war depending for its quality on none of the essentials, which most
of the recent war books emphasize. . Sassoon's detachment, together with
his acuteness as a poet, gives his book an unusual, composite unity." Nation.

IN A MINOR KEY
A NOTE IN MUSIC, by Rosamond Lehmann.
"But the present, like a note in music, is nothing but as it appertains
to what is past and what is to come." And into the lives of Grace Fairfax
and Norah MacKay comes the gay and amusing young Hugh Miller, sym-
bolizing for them the happiness which they are seeking, but which they
have not found in their unsatisfactory marriages. Hugh's stay is short
but he leaves with Grace at least, a tender memory of what might have
been.




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