Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00026
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: October 1930
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning
Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."
Volume Six, Number One Monthly from October to June

OCTOBER, 1930

FROM ALCHEMY TO CHEMISTRY
CRUCIBLES, by Bernard Jaffe.
CRUCIBLES is the fascinating story of chemical research done in terms
which are readily grasped and enjoyed by the lay-reader. It was awarded
the Francis Bacon prize of $7500.00 given jointly by the FORUM Magazine
and the publishers. It presents a series of biographies of the great ad-
venturers in test-tube land; taking the reader from the beginning of the
fifteenth century, with a sketch of the Italian gold-seeking alchemist-
Bernard Trevisan-down to the present time with a sketch of Irving
Langmuir-an American who has developed the gas-filled incandescent
electric light bulb. In the intervening time are sketches of Paracelsus-
the liason worker between chemistry and medicine; Priestly, the discoverer
of the life-sustaining gas, oxygen; the great French analytical chemist,
Lavoisier, who was guillotined during the French Revolution; the Curies-
co-discoverers of radium, along with many others.
Although wholly sound from a scientific point of view, the narrative
never becomes tedious or too complicated for interest. It is a study of
personalities as well as performances. CRUCIBLES is vital and vivid
throughout.
A GREAT NOVEL
PELLE THE CONQUEROR, by Martin Nexo.
This book, one of the great novels of the present century, has grown
steadily in popularity since 1906, when the first part was published. Few
have heard of the book, but that few are always loud in its praise. The
Library's edition was reprinted by Peter Smith, whose services in reprint-
ing out-of-print books are becoming more and more valuable.
The story begins with the emigration of Pelle and his father; Pelle,
a child of six, and his father an old man, from Sweden to Demark, and
continues through Pelle's apprenticeship to his rise to power as the leader
of the Danish workingmen's movement.
Readers will long remember this book, for Nexo's descriptions of the
hardships of farm life and the misery of tenement life in Copenhagen,, are
reality itself.
.0 PERIODICAL


U. 6 .\ I








EMILY DICKINSON
THE LIFE AND MIND OF EMILY DICKINSON, by Genevieve Taggard.
EMILY DICKINSON; FRIEND AND NEIGHBOR, by MacGregor Jenkins.
THE LIFE AND MIND OF EMILY DICKINSON is an exceptionally fine
study of one of America's greatest, and most perplexing poets. Destroy-
ing many myths about a "queer New England spinster and recluse," Miss
Taggard shows a normal person, intensely alive and gifted, although un-
usually self-sufficient. Out of psychology and insight Miss Taggard has
built up her theories, but the available facts are few, and those two vexing
questions-Emily's reason for withdrawing from society and the name of
her lover (if she had one) must remain open to speculation. However,
unless new material comes to light, it will be hard to write a more con-
vincing biography than Miss Taggard's.
In contrast EMILY DICKINSON; FRIEND AND NEIGHBOR is less import-
ant. Memories of her as a neighbor when the author was a small boy,
and a few of her brief, odd notes form the material for this "scanty
estimate" as Mr. Jenkins calls his book.

EMERSON
EMERSON, THE ENRAPTURED YANKEE, by Regis Michaud.
A noteworthy addition to the Emerson bibliography. Here is some-
thing for the scholar and much for the layman. Undergraduates will
find in this book an excellent introduction to Emerson.
Regis Michaud, frankly a devoted admirer of Emerson, does not once
let his enthusiasm carry him beyond the boundaries of truth. Written in
a pleasing style that is usually dramatic and often poetic, this book deserves
many readers.
While most of us will read the book to become better acquainted with
Emerson, we will find much delight in the picture of the times-and in the
incidental characters, such people as Aunt Mary Moody, Thoreau, Margaret
Fuller, and the gentle Ellen.

OUR MOUNTAINS
THE BOOK OF THE WHITE MOUNTAINS, by John Anderson and
Stearns Morse.
"Thus may appear the threefold object of this work, since it hopes to
be reassuring to the resident and to the expert, informative to the stranger,
and convincing to the skeptics. Against a certain selected background of
previous works, and with all deference to tradition and legend, it volunteers
modestly to make the White Mountains as accessible in print as roads and
automobiles and magnificent hotels have made them in physical fact.
When it quails before the majestic beauty of the scenery it casts itself
upon the mercy of the beholders, and reserves the right to rely, with its
tongue in its cheek, on the unbridled word festivals of its predecessors,
as both warning and proof of what all of us have been spared".-Preface.








"MAN'S GRAPPLE WITH REALITY"
MAN AND HIS UNIVERSE, by John Langdon-Davies.
"The book deserves praise, not only because it is a masterly survey
of the history of science and an examination of its influence on man's life
through his religion, but especially because the author has refused the
temptation to announce any new creed. He merely points out that
questions which once were vital are now meaningless, the value imposed
on man by previous philosophies can now be discarded for the sake of a
richer life, that since motion and existence are relative, morals are relative
also. There is much more to be said and he might well have proceeded to
a new list of Commandments. He contents himself with advocating con-
science, tolerance, and a social sense".-Books.

STAFF CHANGES AND LIBRARY NOTES
Mr. William H. Brewer, jr., resigned his position as Reference Li-
brarian on June 1, 1930.
Mr. Brewer's position has been filled by the appointment of Miss Mary
Washburn of Portsmouth. Miss Washburn returns to this Library after
an absence of two years, during which time she held positions in the Man-
chester Public Library and the American Library in Paris. Miss Wash-
burn held the position of Reference Librarian at the University from 1924
to 1928.
The University authorities have greatly aided the Library by making
another room upstairs available all the time for the use of readers in the
Reserved Book Room. Mrs. Huggins will again be in charge of this room.
The Library also benefitted by the action of these same authorities in pro-
viding us with linoleum for the entrance hall and linoleum treads for the
stairs.
During the Summer the Library has purchased all sections available
of the INTERNATIONAL MAP OF THE WORLD. This map is to cover the whole
world on the same scale, about sixteen miles to one inch. Each sheet shows
four degrees of latitude and six degrees of longitude.
The Library was well patronized during the Summer Session this
year. On July 21, the record for circulation, Winter or Summer was broken.
259 books were charged at the desk on that day.
The current periodicals have been divided into two groups, one, publi-
cations of learned and scientific societies, the other, magazines of a more
general appeal. AVIATION, THE ANTIQUARIAN, THE MENTOR, and THE
BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM have been added to the Library's
periodicals.
FOR THE CHILDREN
MYSTERY OF WORLD'S END, by Helen Bamberger.
Here's a mystery story which boys and girls will thoroughly enjoy.
After his accident, Peter Dunn is sent to his uncle in Hawaii to see if the
change will help him regain his health. His uncle is working on an in-








vention connected with sugar cane and to take Peter's mind off his troubles
he pretends someone is trying to steal his work. They soon discover the
joke is a reality and many strange and exciting things happen before the
thief is caught.

"IS AMERICA ON THE WAY?"
THE AMERICAN ROAD TO CULTURE, by George S. Counts.
"This is one of the few outstanding books on education of recent years.
It will interest not only every educator, but every citizen who in any way
is concerned with the trend of education in America. With some of the
author's conclusions doubtless many will disagree, but all will admit that
he is exceptionally well qualified for his task and has succeeded remarkably
well in trying to view our program of education as a foreigner would ob-
serve it. Instead of an approach to our educational theory through
the writings of great educators, the author has followed the more unusual
method of examining the forms which educational institutions actually
have assumed." Taken from a review by Professor Bisbee in the BOSTON
HERALD of August 30.


A GREAT HUMANIST
LIFE AND LETTERS OF STUART P. SHERMAN, by Jacob Zeitlin and
Homer Woodbridge.
An account of the career of this brilliant humanist and critic, so
tragically cut short at forty-five, is given here by two of his closest friends.
His psychological development is traced through his letters and other writ-
ings, which exhibit a robust and intensely human spirit, a charming per-
sonality, and agile and penetrating mind. Sherman was a quiet but
powerful factor in the literary and university life of America, and these
columns will reveal him more fully even to those who followed his career
with interest.

A GREAT AMERICAN
ROOSEVELT, THE STORY OF A FRIENDSHIP, 1880 -1919, by Owen
Wister.
Any Rooseveltiana has great appeal to numberless Americans. This
book should appeal to even more, for its portraits of the "Tennis Cabinet,"
and other of Roosevelt's closest friends.
Wister has doubtless judged Roosevelt's opponents too harshly, espec-
ially Wilson, and his venturing into the field of the War Guilt is somewhat
unwise. Nevertheless the book is of interest in giving so intimate a picture
of a great President.
The Library's edition is not the one recalled at once by the publishers.
Many have guessed, but few know the reason for the recall.




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