Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00024
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: May 1930
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00024
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Volume Five, Number Eight Monthly from October to June

MAY, 1930

JOHNNY APPLESEED
THE ADVENTURES OF JOHNNY APPLESEED, by Henry Chapin.
Johnny Appleseed seems to be in the air. Of special interest in con-
nection with the original play and music on the theme of "Johnny Apple-
seed and Paul Bunyan", to be given by the Durham Players May 5th, is a
book just off the press, entitled "The Adventures of Johnny Appleseed", by
Henry C. Chapin. It is a well told story of hardships in the wilderness
such as the Father of American Orchards might well have met with in his
strange journey through the frontier lands of the early nineteenth century.
The forest and pioneer life from Springfield, Mass., west to Albany, the
Susquehanna, Pittsburgh and the Ohio country, is described with a realism
that is often beautiful and sometimes poignant.

MONEY AND MAN
"& CO.", by Jean-Richard Bloch.
A novel prefaced by Romain Rolland, who writes very rarely now,
ought to be good; and indeed-"& Co."-is typical of the most interesting
French literature of today. This story of a Jewish family leaving Alsace
after the Franco-German War of 1871, and implanted slowly in France,
has the three characteristics of contemporary French writings; develop-
ment of social subjects (here man destroyed by mechanics and relations
with the Jews), a love story which ends badly, and the unsuccessful desire
among the young to abandon hereditary habits or traditions.


A SCOTCH "SCARLET LETTER"
GALLOWS' ORCHARD, by Claire Spencer.
A story of the malicious cruelty inflicted by society upon a transgres-
sor of the moral code, who, in spite of her moral superiority to the ignorant
Scotch villagers, cannot escape from the consequences of their hatred and
blood-lust. The Book-of-the-Month Club choice for April.



%x. S% *%. b







I BELIEVE IN?


TREATISE ON THE GODS, by H. L. Mencken.
"My aim in this book is to describe some of the basic patters of re-
ligious behavior and to show their probable origin in this or that human
need-so much and no more." Preface.
Mencken divides his treatise into five parts. 1. The nature and
origin or religion. 2. Its evolution. 3. Its varieties. 4. Its Christian form.
5. Its state today. He carries his discussion through in a calm and order-
ly manner. Even when he pokes and gibes one does not feel he is doing it
to be smart-he is seeking to understand. Both the believer and the skeptic
should read this.



THE OLD TIME RELIGION

OL' KING DAVID AN' THE PHILISTINE BOYS, by Roark Bradford.
One should prepare for reading this book by going through the old
series of "Stories from the Bible". The reader who has done this, or who
does not need to do this because he knows the Stories already has a great
treat awaiting him in this book. Each chapter in the book is a well-known
Bible story told in negro dialect, and illustrated with allusions sure to be
familiar to the preacher's listeners. Two of the chapter titles are "The
Widow Woman Named Ruth" and "Throw Down Jezebel".

THE GREEN PASTURES, by Marc Connelly.
Closely related to the preceding book is "The Green Pastures". The
author tells us on the title page that his book was suggested by Roark
Bradford's, "01' Man Adam an' His Chillun", which preceded "01' King
David An' the Philistine Boys".
This play is so popular on Broadway that seats can be bought only
from speculators. The action starts in a negro Sunday School, and con-
sists of pictures of Heaven, and how the Lord moves on Earth to enforce
his will. These pictures are the creation of a Sunday School Superintend-
ent to make real to the children the stories he tells them.
A spirit of reverence characterizes the whole play. Some of the stage
directions at first seem irreverent, but the sincerity of the speeches and
motives is always apparent. We are taught now that the phrase "The Old
Guard Dies but Never Surrenders" was invented some years after the Old
Guard was killed, therefore when we read-
Hezdrel-We's ready for 'em. Come on, boys.
Corporal-Le's go, Hezdrel.
Hezdrel-Give 'em ev'thing, boys!
we can easily picture brave men running forth to die.








OKLAHOMA


CIMARRON, by Edna Ferber.
Here again Miss Ferber writes of the swashbuckler, more crude this
time than Gaylord Ravenel, and the woman with executive ability of the
first order.
Sabra Cravat, her husband Yancey and their son Cimarron went to
Oklahoma in the Land Rush of 1889 to settle in the bare town of Osage.
Sabra builds up the town with little help from Yancey, who appears only
when he wishes to do so, and finally is elected to Congress.
"Cimarron" is best as a description, more or less accurate, of how one
of our last frontiers was settled. If we read with that interest first, and do
not examine too closely into the realness of the characters, we are sure of
another good book.


LESSER AMERICANA
THE STAMMERING CENTURY, by Gilbert Seldes.
"This book is not a record of the major events in American history
during the nineteenth century. It is concerned with minor movements,
with the cults and manias of that period. Its personages are fanatics, and
radicals, and mountebanks. Its intention is to connect these secondary
movements and figures with the primary forces of the century, and to sup-
ply a background in American history for the cults and manias of our own
time."-Preface.


TWO NEW NOVELS
CORA, by Ruth Suckow.
From her childhood, Cora Schwietert, hating her father's haphazard
way of providing for his family, is determined that she will make a place
for herself in the world. With achievement in her grasp she goes to the
Yellowstone for her first vacation, and suddenly finds herself passionately
in love. Her married life ends abruptly and she is forced to readjust her
outlook on life. The family life of the Schwieterts provides an interesting
and at times amusing background for Cora's progress.
THE KRAMER GIRLS, by Ruth Suckow.
Georgie and Annie Kramer have great hopes for their young sister
Rose. Tied down by the care of a paralytic mother, the two girls save and
sacrifice their own pleasures in order that Rose may have the chance denied
them. When it seems as if their hopes are to be realized Rose comes home
for a vacation and marries a poor man, with neither money nor ambition.
Eventually it is revealed to Rose and Annie that no one else can live anoth-
er's life and with that realization comes a greater happiness.








WAYFARERS TO THE ORIENT


SHIRT-TAIL AND PIGTAIL, by Henry Schroeder and Laurance Peters.
Schroeder and Peters are sitting in their Yale dormitory. Both want
to to go somewhere, and since one or the other has been everywhere but
the East, they choose Kashgar as their goal and start for it by the way of
the Black Sea. Kashgar is in Chinese Turkestan, which in itself makes the
tale interesting.
The nearer they get to Kashgar the better the book is. In the first
chapters one is somewhat wearied by the recital of their good times, and by
various smart Aleck chapter headings. Kashgar never is reached, and for
about two weeks the return of the Expedition seemed extremely doubtful.
The authors both agree that they shall do nothing which might be
characteristic of Halliburton, which agreement is carried out fairly well.
For those who want to learn as they read, the book has an enlightening
chapter on Communism.




NEW BIOGRAPHIES
MAD ANTHONY WAYNE, by Thomas Boyd.
An historical biography of the Revolutionary general and impetuous
hero. For his daring maneuvers early in his military career he was called
"mad" Anthony Wayne, and the term stuck. His military strategy was al-
ways aggressive, but his real fame as a soldier is due to his capture of
Stony Point and his Georgia and Indian campaigns. After the war he con-
tinued the work of George Rogers Clark in making the region north of the
Ohio safe for white settlers. Book Review Digest.

GEORGE WASHINGTON; THE SAVIOR OF THE STATES, by Rupert
Hughes.
Volume 3 of Hughes's "Washington". More myths are dispelled, and
Washington is seen as a greater man and a greater general. The accounts
of the desertions, whippings, graft, and general incompetence of the Col-
onies make the final victory even more of a marvel. The French are given
in this book the greater credit for the Battle of Yorktown.

GEORGES CLEMENCEAU, by Jean Martet.
"This is not a book but a man." As a piece of literature, it might be
voted faulty-artless, disjointed. It lacks the decorous arrangement which
Paleologue introduced into his conversations with "The Tragic Empress";
it is free from the venomous cleverness displayed by Brousson. It is honest,
intelligent, and extraordinarily convincing. Thus, and not otherwise, must
Old Man Victory have growled and snarled and jested. Books.




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