Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00022
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: March 1930
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00022
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning


Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."


Volume Five, Number Six Monthly from October to June


MARCH, 1930


THE CRUCIFIXION

FIREHEAD, by Lola Ridge.
The author of GHETTO and SUN-UP now offers FIREHEAD. GHETTO
gave much and promised more; so did SUN-UP. FIREHEAD surpasses both
of these former-poems. In its entirety it is a powerful combination of
those qualities so rarely found together: drama, lyric, and image. There
is little of the experimenter here and none of the propagandist; the touch
is sure, and the result is poetry; to the extent that one forgets to notice
the effective variations of meter-and the diction that comes very near
being amazing.
Here is the day of the Crucifixion seen through the eyes of people in-
timately or casually connected with the Christ-and we must not forget
that here is the soul of Lola Ridge. If you feel that you ought to read
some modern poetry, turn to THE MADNESS IN THE FIELD in the full-length
portrait of Judas; you will then read the whole poem.


IN THE WILDERNESS, by Sigrid Undset.
The third volume in the tetralogy, the Master of Hestviken, continues
the story of Olav after Ingunn's death. He is seen in 13th century Eng-
land, at Hestviken with Eirik, and finally fighting against the Swedish in-
vaders of Norway.
"Although its time is mediaeval, its wealth of homely detail and the
richness and reality of its scenes are worthy of modernity."
o s.o








PURE GOLD, by 0. E. Rolvaag.

"But God said unto him,
Thou fool, this night thy soul
Shall be required of thee: then
Whose shall those things be,
Which thou hast provided ?"
By the author of "Giants in the Earth" and "Peder Victorious". In
this novel Rolvaag is more interested in the personal destinies of his char-
acters than in the portraying of a race or class.
Louis and Lizzie Houglum are saving and thrifty, and are laying up
a store for hard times. One day Louis brings home a new ten dollar gold
piece, the first gold money either has seen. From now on Lizzie has but
one motive-to get more gold. We see her continuously growing greed,
and then the ultimate end of all her hoarding.


CORONET, by Michael Kcmroff.

A coronet is fashioned and a silver whip is mended by a jeweller in
Renaissance Florence. The former goes to France, where it is displayed,
entombed for two hundred years, and recovered just as Napoleon sets out
to conquer Russia. The tragedy of that campaign, vividly pictured, brings
Napoleon back to France with little beside the silver whip, lost on the
battlefield by a descendant of the original owner. Now the crown and the
whip travel together through many hands, bringing more evil than good
to their owners, and drawing forth, as if magnetically, the weakness in
each generation. Aristocracy, following in their wake, passes from blood
to brains, from brains to money, and alights, with the coronet and a de-
cadent nobleman, in the home of a Chicago pork packer.


IN THE EVENING OF MY THOUGHT, by Georges Clemanceau.

Any reader must love both Philosophy and Clemenceau in order to
read one thousand pages to learn Clemenceau's philosophy of life. The
book may be described best as a philosophical autobiography, since noth-
ing but his philosophy is told by the author.
The only bond of unity among the various subjects is Clemenceau's
contempt for religion, but everyone will find one or more chapters that
appeal to him. Perhaps the best are "Men and Gods", "Evolution", and
"And Hereafter ?".
We in America are not accustomed to a politician writing philosophy
as Clemenceau, or a scientist in politics as Pioncar6, so it comes as some-
what of a shock to learn a rugged, uncompromising, and altruistic philos-
ophy from a foreign politician, no matter how eminent he may have been.








GOOD-BYE TO ALL THAT, by Robert Graves.
The author writes briefly of his childhood; his schooling; his years
in the trenches; his marriage and its failure. The war years are pictured
most vividly and show the effects of the war upon a poetic and sensitive
nature. There are interesting accounts of prominent literary figures of
England-Hardy, Masefield, Edith Sitwell, T. E. Lawrence, and others.
The author in this book bids a farewell to his past thirty-four years.


PARTY GOVERNMENT IN THE UNITED STATES, by John W. Davis.
The first half of Mr. Davis's book summarizes the history of political
parties in the United States, as an introduction to government by party.
The second half describes party organization, and gives his methods for
strengthening party allegiance and responsibility. This part includes an
interesting discussion and complete condemnation of the direct primary.
Few books of only sixty pages give so clear a description of American
political parties with such valuable suggestions for their reform.


FRANKLIN, THE APOSTLE OF MODERN TIMES, by Bernard Fay.
Benjamin Franklin has been an appealing subject for biographers
always, since he could be set out with vividness and accepted with delight.
It has been a pleasure to credit him whole-heartedly with having instigated
work of far-reaching merit-the founding of the first public library in
America, for instance. In this scholarly book of Fay's we are amused to
read how clearly Franklin comprehended the way to popularity, and thus
made quick progress in the world, by appearing moderate in all things and
quiet at all times.
Here too, the features of Franklin's life, which are of outstanding
importance, are clearly and most interestingly told. The story of how
one man became a great diplomat, scientist, and humanitarian will always
be interesting. His services to his country are more appreciated when
described by a Frenchman.
Among the personal passages are the accounts of his youth in Boston;
of his friendships with stimulating if not substantial men; of his life with
his Debby, and of his continual exercise of humility-a great luxury to
him. Fay has not neglected the amusing narrative of Franklin's senti-
mental life.


"We ask of a light novel chiefly that it entertain us * We do not
and should not expect it to give us what more serious novels give-some
searching examination of human or social problems, or a full-bodied study
of character, or a fantasy or romance wrought in beautiful terms."
-Donald Davidson, in "Creative Reading".








NEW CHILDREN'S BOOKS


THE CHINESE INK STICK, by Kurt Wiese.
This remarkable ink stick has many adventures with its different
owners and tells interesting stories about people and places in China.
You will enjoy the pictures by the author.

AMERICAN FOLK AND FAIRY TALES, Selected by Rachel Field.
Here is one of the first collections of the folk tales of our own coun-
try. It includes some of the best Indian legends, Negro, Colonial and Old
South tales, not omitting The Great Stone Face and Brer Rabbit.

THE CHRISTOPHER ROBIN STORY BOOK, by A. A. Milne.
Selections from "When We Were Very Young", "Now We Are Six",
"Winnie-the-Pooh", and "House at Pooh Corner". Decorated by E. H.
Shepard.

MORE "VERY YOUNG" SONGS, by A. A. Milne. Music by H. Fraser-
Simson.
The words and music of ten poems from the two books of verse which
Mr. Milne has written for children, and which are liked by children and
grown-ups alike.

A CHILD'S GEOGRAPHY OF THE WORLD, by V. M. Hillyer.
A companion volume to "A Child's History of the World." In a hu-
morous, informal way, the subject of geography comes alive and places
and people do not seem so strange when you learn so many things about
them. Clever little illustrations.
KIT AND KAT, by Lucy F. Perkins.
The Dutch twins have more amusing adventures and their little dog
Heiny, is always into mischief.
WASHINGTON, D. C., by F. M. Fox.
This is a fine description of the "Nation's Capital", the buildings and
the men who have helped to make the nation grow.
CARMELLA COMMANDS, by Walter Ball.
Carmella is an American girl whose parents are Italians and do not
understand English. So Carmella "commands" her whole family, in-
cluding her father's business venture which she does not fully understand,
but which turns out successfully.
SEASHORE BOOK FOR CHILDREN, by Thornton Burgess.
Danny Meadow Mouse takes an unexpected trip to the shore in an
airplane and learns many things about seashore life. The pictures will
help you to recognize some of the seashore creatures Danny did not know.




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