Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00020
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: January 1930
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text






THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927. at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Volume Five, Number Four Monthly from October to June

JANUARY, 1930

WAR GUILT
JULY, '14, by Emil Ludwig.
Written in 1921 but withheld from publication until a riper time, this
volume now comes to a world totally disillusioned with regard to the late
war, though still ignorant of much of the inside story of its genesis. Lud-
wig exposes it all-the stupidity, vanity, treachery, of a few men who
wanted war for the glorification of their own diplomacy; telegrams with-
held, reports falsified, lies tossed back and forth, until a few men were
so deeply involved in intrigue that to save their faces they were forced to
set the match to the great bonfire. The guilt seems to rest primarily with
Vienna and Petrograd, with Berlin and Paris as seconds, and London a late
third.
Blue Books, memoirs, and other recognized sources form the basis of
the book, which is written in clear, pithy style and is more exciting than
any novel of intrigue. It is also characterized by an impartiality that makes
its exposures the more ghastly to internationally-minded people. The au-
thor has examined sources which became available since the first writing of
the book, but has found little to modify in his conclusions.

WHY CULTURE?
THE MEANING OF CULTURE, by John Cowper Powys.
Half of Mr. Powys's book is spent in analyzing culture and placing it
in relationship with philosophy, religion, the arts, and with man. The
other half is spent in demonstrating the value of culture in everyday life,
and herein is the book's value.
Perhaps Mr. Powys is only relating his own philosophy of life, but
that matters little. The main point is that in this book we can learn to
seek culture as a means of warding off that in the world which makes us
ordinary, that we can here find a means of making happiness secure, no
matter how buffeted by chance.



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THE PORTRAIT OF A WRITER
HUDSON RIVER BRACKETED, by Edith Wharton.
The title is the style of architecture of which The Willows, the un-
tenanted seat of the Lorburn family is a fine example. This old house,
overlooking the Hudson, symbolizes for Vance Weston an inheritance from
the past which his life in Euphoria, Illinois, has denied him. His progress
on the road of success is hampered by the illness of his frail, childlike wife,
Laura Lou, his unfair contact with the Hour, his difficulty in adjusting
himself to Halo's social group-combined with his love for her, and by his
desire for a sustaining faith, but this struggle is what makes the book one
of absorbing interest.



SOME OLD FRIENDS
BOOKS AND THE MAN, by John T. Winterich.
"Talent alone cannot make the writer.
There must be a man behind the book."-Emerson.
And so Mr. Winterich has made a happy selection of twenty books
which have stood the test of time and of public favor. The many illustra-
tions aid us to appreciate better the histories of these books, as well as the
stories of the men who wrote them.
Among the twenty are "Leaves of Grass", "Alice's Adventures in
Wonderland", "Pickwick Papers", Franklin's "Autobiography", and "The
Scarlet Letter". Much information about first editions may be gleaned
from these pages, thus giving the book even greater interest to the book-
lover.



BANNED IN ENGLAND
LIFE'S EBB AND FLOW, by Frances, Countess of Warwick.
Lady Warwick describes the gay balls, brilliant house parties, and fre-
quent visits exchanged with royalty which took place often in her younger
days, and then tells of her refusal to be bound by the rules of society, which
she disregarded as she chose, even when visiting Queen Victoria. Her
social life never prevented her from contributing her time, strength, and
money to many schemes for the welfare of man. This interest naturally
lead her into Socialism, for which cause she has worked intelligently and
supported whole-heartedly. Triumphs, defeats, sorrow, and her sixty-
eight years, have not dimmed Lady Warwick's hopes, for she assures us
that to her every day is a fresh adventure, and is unmarred by regrets for
what has past-for the past to her is only delighful memories.









THE HIGHER HANDICRAFTS


HOOKED RUGS AND HOW TO MAKE THEM, by A. M. L. PHILLIPS.

This book is for the collector and maker of hooked rugs. The author
tells their history, and how to make and preserve them. A few chap-
ters are devoted to braided rugs, since the interest in one variety of rug is
often accompanied by interest in the other.

LINOLEUM BLOCK PRINTING, by Ernest W. Watson.
A book for the artist, student, and amateur. Although too late for
this year's Christmas cards, this will help you to make them for next year.
Mr. Watson has illustrated his work with cuts and line drawings of the
processes of block printing from the original drawing, cutting, to the ac-
tual printing of the block. All stages are so well described that the person
who never has tried block printing will have no difficulty in following
directions.


THE HAPPY EXILE

MID-CHANNEL, by Ludwig Lewisohn.

An autobiographical sequel to "Upstream", in which the author re-
lates his experience on the Continent since quitting this country. He
varies his narrative with the comments and meditations on many phases
of life especially the American scene. He pleads strongly for the return
of the Jew to Judaism, since he thinks this can be the only salvation for the
Jew in the modern world.
Mr. Lewisohn is the same delightful stylist in this book as in his others.


AN ENIGMATIC QUEEN

QUEEN ELIZABETH, by Katharine Anthony.

This latest study of Elizabeth delves into all the intimate details of her
life and of the other lives most closely affecting hers. This historic setting
is very slightly sketched in as a background, while historical events, either
political or cultural, are dismissed when they have served to introduce their
leading actors. Elizabeth, always an enigmatic character, remains in a
sense impregnable, in spite of this disclosure of her weakness and strength,
her masculine and feminine traits, her coquetry, her indecision, her self-
styled kingly qualities. The material appears to be drawn, with two or
three exceptions, from secondary sources.









CALVIN COOLIDGE


THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF CALVIN COOLIDGE.
This autobiography differs from that of Governor Smith chiefly in its
omission of the details of political maneuvering, and its inclusion of more
of the author's philosophy of action. President Coolidge's book is in no
sense a revealing of political events with which he had to deal, save his
explanation of his part in the Boston police strike. We are not told much
either of his personal life, but the details given are delightful, especially
his description of Mrs. Coolidge. The best parts of, the books are his com-
ments on life and politics, the explanation of the Senate rules being the
gem of the lot.


THE MAKER OF MODERN EUROPE
RICHLIEU, by Hilaire Belloc.
Belloc's book is written to prove the thesis that Richlieu began what
Bismarck finished; that is the division of Europe into various nations.
Richlieu wanted to save France, and to do so opposed both Austria and
Spain, either of whom could have united Europe, although perhaps only by
conquest.
Some of the political shifting are so involved that the book at times
becomes a puzzle, but we can always see what motives are driving Richlieu
to his actions. A character as Richlieu must be uncomfortable to know,
but a book about a man so driven by one idea that all things, even people,
are seen only as a means to further this idea is good reading.


HORROR, MYSTERY, AND SUDDEN DEATH
THE OMNIBUS OF CRIME, by Dorothy Sayers.
Rumor says that the day of the mystery story is over. Perhaps, but
meanwhile any devotee can find justification for the faith he holds dear
in this collection of mystery stories by all the great ones, from the Book
of Daniel to Dickens.
By all means read the introduction, for Miss Sayers, the author of
"Lord Peter Views the Body", has done a delightful and scholarly work in
tracing the history and varieties of the detective story.




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