Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00019
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: December 1929
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text






THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning
Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Volume Five, Number Three Monthly from October to June

DECEMBER, 1929

WAR AND THE OPERATING TABLE
STRETCHERS, by Frederick A. Pottle.
"Stretchers" is different from other War books in that it relates the
life of an American soldier from enlistment at Fort Slocum, to the training
camp in Georgia, the battle front, Army of Occupation, and discharge at
Fort Devens. Mr. Pottle's description of the workings of the military
machine is clear and always interesting.
The book differs as well because the actual fighting is treated wholly
from the point of view of a surgical unit operating immediately behind the
front. The vivid language and clear expositions make this War's advances
in surgical procedure clear to the layman.
"Stretchers" does not argue against war; instead we are given pic-
tures of the troops going into action, while the author wonders what many
of them will look like when they reach the operating table.


TWO SUCCESSES OF THE N. Y. STAGE

THE ENGLISH "ALL QUIET"
JOURNEY'S END, by R. C. Sherriff.
Lovers of "All Quiet" will enjoy this play -another psychological
study of the effect of the war on the man in the trench. Written with poetic
imagination and lyricism.


A SIDEWALK OF NEW YORK
STREET SCENE, by Elmer L. Rice.
This play takes place in front of a typical brickfront apartment house
of the East Side. A realistic portrayal of this section.
The Pulitzer Prize Play of the last season and still going strong on the
New York stage.









A GOSSAMER UNIVERSE
THE UNIVERSE AROUND US, by Sir James Jeans.
By strenuous exercise we may accompany Sir James on a trip around
the universe, exploring the inconceivable vastness thereof, the nature of
the individual stars, and of the great, distant nebulae. We learn that
"Pattern, plan, and design are there in abundance, but solid substance is
rare," and of that solid substance our earth appears a very tiny part-a
fortuitous entity. Small though the earth may be, it is nevertheless im-
portant to us, and we are reassured to find that our planet has a probable
expectation of a million million years of habitable existence.
One cannot fail to be moved by the contemplation of the vastness of
time and space as here presented, or to consider and reconsider his place
in the scheme of things. If his ego is disturbed in the process, he can know
at least the melancholy superiority that man lives on perhaps the only, or
at any rate one of the few habitable bodies of the universe. We are far
away from the centre of things and comparatively the universe has run
most of its course; yet in gazing down the future we see more scope than
we can now realize for the working out of our destiny.



THE HINTERLAND OF SCIENCE
THE NATURE OF THE PHYSICAL WORLD, by A. S. Addington.
Slightly more difficult to read than Jeans, but equally worth the effort,
is this account of the present state of scientific knowledge. If the lay
mind cannot entirely grasp the nature of quanta or curved space, it can at
least achieve veiled glimpses of these realms and return with wider hori-
zons. There are excursions also into the field of astronomy, which cor-
roborate the evidence of Jeans, and which stated in somewhat different
form, give the lay mind additional light on rather difficult concepts. The
thread of humor running through the book enlivens many discussions, such
as that of Newton and the apple. The former postulated a mysterious
force which no one could see, while the latter, at rest in the air, saw Newton
suddenly propelled upward toward itself by the very real pounding of the
molecules of earth on the soles of his feet. The case for the apple is much
stronger, unless we give Newton a few compensating advantages. Even
then, he turns out to be wrong, for modern investigation proves gravity to
be, not the mysterious force he thought it, but a completely describable
property of curved space.
While physical existence becomes more exact there is at the same time
an element of mysticism creeping in. The physicist begins to admit that
things may be more than the sum of their parts, that some phenomena can-
not be explained but only observed, that reason and beauty neither can be
nor need be reduced to electrons.









CABELL'S SWAN SONG
WAY OF ECBEN, by James Branch Cabell.
"The story of Alfgar who heard the music beyond the moon." A fan-
tasy in the traditional Cabellian style. The last section of the book is de-
voted to an autobiographical statement by Cabell-his aims of the past and
his plans for the future.

SINS OF THE SPIRIT
THE UNCERTAIN TRUMPET, by A. S. M. Hutchinson.
David Quest and Father Absolute eventually save the situation when
the irresistable Banjo falls in love with his half-brother's wife, lovely, in-
nocent Dawn. The events leading up to the crisis are very entertaining,
and Mr. Hutchinson's humor is as refreshing as ever.

NEW CHILDREN'S BOOKS
SKAZKI: TALES AND LEGENDS OF OLD RUSSIA. Told by Ida)
Zeitlin. Illustrated by Theodore Nadejen.
Originally intended for children, this book is a rich gold mine for all
who feel the lure of the "symbolism, wisdom, fantastic imagery, humor and
love of nature," which belongs particularly to the Russians. Four of
Pushkin's tales are included, among them the Golden Cock, given annually
at the Metropolitan Opera. The book is profusely illustrated in colors and
black and white. The artist, a Russian, has cleverly interpreted the spirit
of his people as revealed in the folk-tales.
REALMS OF GOLD IN CHILDREN'S BOOKS, by Bertha Mahony and
Elinor Whitney.
It would be hard to find another book so valuable to parents, teachers,
and librarians in the selection of books for boys and girls as is Realms of
Gold. Far from being merely a dry, uninteresting list of books, it has a
fascination which few can resist. Reproductions of illustrations in many
of the books listed, lively notes and quotations, information about the
authors and illustrators, and an attractive format, make this book an ex-
cellent source of entertainment and information for children and parents.
AUNT JO'S SCRAP BAG, by Louisa M. Alcott.
A selection of the best stories in the six volumes of the Scrap Bag.
WAGS AND WOOFIE, by Aldredge and McKee.
A story of two lively puppies which the children will enjoy.
GILES OF THE MAYFLOWER, by Ralph Barbour.
How a group of boys helped to settle Plymouth colony.
COURAGEOUS COMPANIONS, by Charles Finger.
A thrilling tale of the adventures of a young lad who sailed with Ma-
gellan on the first voyage around the world. (Winner of Longman's prize.)
TWO FUNNY CLOWNS, by Bertha and Elmer Hader.
Cleverly illustrated tales of Bother and Blink and their circus friends.








AMELIARANNE AND THE MONKEY, by Constance Howard.
More adventures of Ame]iaranne. This time she gets into the movies.
BLACK STORM, by Thomas Hinkle.
Can you think of a better name for a spirited black horse? The story
of his life on the Western Plains.
THE CROOKED APPLE TREE, by Cornelia Meigs.
"Everything turns out happily on a hill overlooking the Mississippi
near an old cabin and a crooked apple tree."
THE JESTER'S PURSE AND OTHER PLAYS, by N. E. Minchin.
A collection of delightful plays for children, including directions for
costumes and scenery.

GIFTS FROM THE SIMPSON FUND
THE BLADED BARRIER, by Joseph B. Ames.
An ingenious accumulation of horrors.
MISTRAL, by Max Brand.
A hot-tempered horse trained by kindness into a winning race-horse.
THE INCREDIBLE YEAR, by Faith Baldwin.
A girl from the North Woods is plunged into the whirl of city life.
THE CORRAL OF DEATH, by Malcolm Wheeler.
Lives up to its title.
FAMILY GROUP, by Diana Patrick.
How a large middle class family spends its windfall in Europe.
OVER AND OVER STORIES, by Clarence and Margaret Weed.
Mr. Weed. formerly of the faculty here, and his daughter have writ-
ten another collection of children's stories.

NEAPOLITAN ROMANCE
BLACK ROSES, by Francis Brett Young.
Studying art in Naples, Paul Ritchie, son of an English father and an
Italian peasant, falls passionately in love with Cristina, mistress of his
rooming house, but surrounded with mystery. Then comes the plague and
the young artist finds that "sorrow has black petall'd roses."

STILL YANKEES
CHANGING NEW ENGLAND, by Edward E. Whiting.
Mr. Whiting, the well-known columnist of the Boston "Herald," has
written this book as one of the opening guns for the Massachusetts Ter-
centenary to be celebrated next year. The book as a whole is devoted to
the thesis that New England will be as New England has been because of
the natural conditions here. Mr. Whiting writes his book as he did his
daily column, which means that all readers are assured of some witty and
clever reading, at its best when giving recipes for the best known New
England dishes.




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