Title: Library lantern
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00017
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: October 1929
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00017
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLIAM W. SHIRLEY, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."
Volume Five, Number One Monthly from October to June

OCTOBER, 1929
STILL THE BEST SELLER
ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT, by Erich Maria Remarque.
The publishers now tell us that this story of a private in the German
army has been translated into twenty-two languages. This makes it the
most popular war novel as yet. Remarque defends himself from those who
say he wrote of that which he did not see in an interview reprinted in the
"Boston Transcript" of September 21. No other War book has shown so
well the influence of the War on a particular group.

THANKS TO THE BOOK CLUBS
ULTIMA THULE, by Henry Handel Richardson.
Without book clubs "Ultima Thule" would probably be as little known
as the other books by H. H. Richardson, as this Australian woman calls
herself. Tragedy so living that it commands reflection is not popular.
Read it, for the account of how Dr. Richard Townshend-Mahony becomes
part of the soil of Australia is one of the greatest stories of this year.

OLD ADELINE AND FINCH SURPRISE THE WHITEOAKS
WHITEOAKS OF JALNA, by Mazo de la Roche.
A continuation of "Jalna" with further chronicles of the Clan of
Whiteoaks-chiefly a psychological study of Finch, the esthete, artist and
mystic; his struggle against his hardy and cruel brothers, and his final
triumph over the whole family.

NICARAGUA
DOLLARS FOR BULLETS, by Harold Denny.
Mr. Denny's title comes from a saying of President Taft's. His ac-
count of Nicaragua's is most readable, and is not written to support any
theory. Mr. Denny has been for some years a correspondent of the "New
York Times," and covered the late distu bance in Nicaragua.
.O PERIODICAL


1. S. %6\








POETRY
ANGELS AND EARTHLY CREATURES, by Elinor Wylie.
Granville Hicks in the "New York World" says, "Every poem in 'An-
gels and Earthly Creatures' shows that self-assurance whose lack her bril-
liance had only partially concealed. The first part of the book, composed
of nineteen sonnets, is one of the most clearly individual groups of love
poems in our literature."


"WHEN LOVELY WOMAN STOOPS TO FOLLY"
THEY STOOPED TO FOLLY, by Ellen Glasgow.
Ellen Glasgow went to Goldsmith for a title to her new "comedy of
morals". This narrative of the changing conceptions of morals as reflected
in a small Virginia town is one of the wittiest books of the year. Critics
say that Miss Glasgow is on the way to becoming the Galsworthy or Thack-
eray of America.


SOUTH AMERICAN ADVENTURE
THE COURTS OF THE MORNING, by John Buchan.
Sandy runs a South American revolution to drive from power a man
dangerous to the peace of the world in general, and to democracy in par-
ticular. Just improbable enough to make it a good adventure story.


AN AMERICAN NOVEL
"Because the road was steep and long,
And through a dark and lonely land,
God set upon my lips a song
And put a lantern in my hand."
A LANTERN IN HER HAND, by Bess Streeter Aldrich.
This book has been climbing steadily toward the best seller lists for
about a year. Mrs. Aldrich has written a story of pioneer life as delightful
as "Mother Mason," but with far more background.


ANOTHER GOOD MYSTERY
THE ROMAN HAT MYSTERY, by Ellery Queen.
The Stokes Company is afraid the present vogue of mystery stories
will cease. To make its continuation more certain, they have decided to
publish only one mystery a year, and make that one good. "The Roman
Hat Mystery" is their choice this year, and they chose well. The interest
starts at the second line and continues throughout the book.









NEW ENCYCLOPEDIAS
First comes the fourteenth edition of the "Encyclopedia Brittanica."
The editors of this edition have forsworn their former errors, and revised
the work completely. No longer will it be necessary to look up your article
in three confusing alphabets. This new edition is well bound in twenty-
four volumes, finely illustrated and well printed.
The next is the "Enciclopedico Hispano-Americano." This work is
new to the library, and adds much to our collection of Spanish reference
books.
Finally the library has a new edition of Bailey's "Standard Cyclopedia
of Horticulture." All Garden Club members can now find out easily when
to take up the bulbs this fall, and any other information they may need for
their gardens.

STAFF NOTES
Mr. William H. Brewer, Jr., has been appointed to the position of
Reference Assistant. Mr. Brewer has been on the staff of the Salem
Public Library, and is a graduate of the Pratt Institute School of Library
Science.
Miss Charlotte Thompson represented the library at the meeting of
the New Hampshire Library Association in Concord, September 18.

CHANGES IN THE LIBRARY
The catalogs have been moved to the rear of the circulation desk to
make room for cases for the new books, and duplicate pay collection.
Bound periodicals are shelved in the basement, thus giving more room
in the Periodical Reading Room to read the current volumes of the maga-
zines.
Both the Periodical Reading Room, and the Reference Room have
changed by moving the tables. Reading is not a social art, so it is desirable
to have the tables as individual as possible.
Students in the Reserved Book Room will go back of the charging desk
and select their own books. Books are to be signed for at the desk as
before.

CHANGES IN LIBRARY RULES
Three-week books are to be renewed but once.
Persons owing the library one dollar or more in fines are to settle the
account before more books can be borrowed.
If a big hare in rapid hops
Chase tortoise from the rear,
"Can we assume," the Thinker said,
"A point where they compeer ?"
"'Tis doubtful," says Philosophy,
And sheds a bitter tear.
-El Rebo.









IN THE CHILDREN'S ROOM


ANDREW LANG.
The Children's Room now has the latest edition of the "Lang Fairy
Books." All volumes are bound in the color which matches the title. Show
them to your parents, and they will tell you they read the very same stories.


OTHER NEW BOOKS FOR CHILDREN
POOR CECCO, by Margery Bianco.
Cecco is a wonderful wooden dog, who is always jolly until he goes out
into the world and has strange adventures.

A BOY OF BRUGES, by E. Cammaerts.
How children live in Belgium.

TALES OF WISE AND FOOLISH ANIMALS, by Valery Carrick.
Stories of animals. Your fathers and mothers will want to see the
pictures, too.

THE FORGE IN THE FOREST, by Padriac Colum.
Four brothers go into the forest to have a wild horse shod. Read the
stories they tell the Royal Smith, and what he tells them about the horse.
Look at Artzybasheff's illustrations.

THE WHITE CAT AND OTHER FRENCH FAIRY TALES, by Comtesse
D'Aulnoy.
Good stories, with Elizabeth MacKinstry's illustrations.

JACKANAPES AND OTHER TALES, by Mrs. J. H. Ewing.
Three good stories in one book-Jackanapes, Daddy Darwin's Dove-
cote, and the Story of a Short Life.

RUSTY PETE, by Doris Folger.
A very busy cow pony and his friends on the Lazy A-B Ranch tell us
just how they live and work.

MILLIONS OF CATS, by Wanda Gag.
A tale of many cats, with pictures for the smallest in the family.

WHERE IT ALL COMES TRUE: IN ITALY AND SWITZERLAND, by
Betty and Mary Laughlin.
These two girls travel with their aunt, who writes books of travel for
the grown-ups. A true account of their trip abroad.




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