Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00015
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: May 1929
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning
Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLARD P. LEWIS, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."
Volume Four, Number Eight Monthly from October to June

MAY, 1929

"Something very significant has happened to a man when he realizes
that in books the greatest souls of the world will come to call on him as
though there were no one else on earth whom they had to call upon."
-Fosdick.

SIGNIFICANT BOOKS IN
I. RELIGION
SCIENCE IN SEARCH OF GOD, by Kirtley F. Mather.
The author applies the methods of science to prove the existence, and
to some extent the nature, of God. Spiritual attributes, he says, are a re-
sponse to a Supreme Being just as the eye and ear are a response to light
and sound. Beyond these principles science makes no pronouncements, but
science and religion are alike in that both are ultimately dependent upon
faith, that is, action based on belief. The belief in free will and moral re-
sponsibility also seems to be scientifically acceptable when viewed in the
light of the geologic past. Whether you agree entirely with this book or
not it will help you to think and hence clarify your own ideas.
II. EDUCATION
THE READING INTERESTS AND HABITS OF ADULTS, by William
S. Gray and Ruth Monroe.
An adult education movement of great significance is spreading
throughout the country as evidenced in the formation of the American
Association for Adult Education, in greatly increased activity on the part
of the public library, the correspondence schools, the lecture bureaus and
other agencies for instructional work outside of the schools and colleges.
In connection with this movement comes this study of the reading habits
and interests of social groups, of community groups and individuals. Very
properly it points to the importance of reading better books as well as more
books and to the dangerous tendency at present in evidence of reading an
increasing number of newspapers and periodicals in place of books. A
most interesting section is devoted to children's reading and the impor-
tance of guidance for the young.
III. HISTORY
THE AFTERMATH, by Winston Churchill.
In this concluding volume of his history of the Great War Mr.
Churchill strikes a very high note in the interest of world peace and inter-



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national relations. He ably presents the situation immediately following
the war in the various countries of Europe and from first hand knowledge
traces the development of the League of Nations and the various confer-
ences leading up to the Treaty of Locarno, showing their importance in the
future welfare of Europe. One of the most important books and sets of
books which have come out of the war.
IV. POETRY
FURTHER POEMS OF EMILY DICKINSON; withheld from publication
by her sister Lavinia.
Tiny gems which express the gamut of existence, delightfully reveal-
ing Emily's soul as she poured it out to "sister Sue"; treasures composing
her most beautiful and most important book.
V. TRAVEL
THE LAST HOME OF MYSTERY; by E. Alexander Powell.
India and the almost inaccessible kingdom of Nepal, which lies be-
tween India and Tibet, furnish the scene for this fascinating, swiftly mov-
ing picture. The beauties of scenery, the marvellous architecture every-
where displayed, the temples with bell-hung eaves, the cities of Khat-
mandu, Bhatgaon and Pashpattie the Holy, are pictured in a masterly way,
as well as the unsanitary conditions and horrible practices carried on in
the name of religion. Intimate glimpses are given of Indian princes in
their luxurious palaces with motor cars, polo stables, elephants and large
retinues of servants. Illustrated with photographs by the author.
VI. CRITICISM
THE MODERN TEMPER; A STUDY AND A CONFESSION, by Joseph
Wood Krutch.
Searching and therefore disillusioned and slightly pessimistic research
into the harassed soul of the contemporary. The author finds nothing to
reassure the informed modern yet maintains a passionate belief in the
value of human intelligence. The book may be placed beside Spengler's
Decline of the west, Robinson's The mind in the making, and Whither man-
kind for its able attempt to estimate what we are and what we may become.
THE RE-DISCOVERY OF AMERICA; AN INTRODUCTION TO A
PHILOSOPHY OF AMERICAN LIFE, by Waldo Frank.
A critical survey of American life and civilization deploring its tend-
ency to smug self-complacency, its failure to produce any real creative
genius and its danger of being overwhelmed in a mechanical jungle. Pes-
simistic yet stimulating, destructive yet looking forward to the develop-
ment of a new order.
VII. BIOGRAPHY
GEORGE BORROW, by Samuel M. Elam.
Mr. Elam with delicious sarcasm, here holds up to light the erratic
life of "Lavengro," the gypsy follower. A precious rogue he was, an ar-
rant hypocrite, a so-called priest when convenient, a brilliant scholar, a
marvellous linguist translating at least thirty-five languages. He died in
1881 mourned by few.








HENRY THE EIGHTH, by Francis Hackett.
Brilliant biography of one of the first modern historical figures. The
monarch's six wives have long been every schoolboy's memory peg and the
author shows that they more than any other factor truly influenced the
political, religious and economic aspects of his reign.
THE EXQUISITE TRAGEDY; AN INTIMATE LIFE OF JOHN RUS-
KIN, by Amabel Williams-Ellis.
"The spoiled Puritan, the superior man in the blue neckcloth, the
fretful child of a hard narrow culture," this is the Ruskin treated in "The
Exquisite Tragedy," a psychological study rather than a straight chrono-
logical biography. The causes behind his unhappiness are discussed frank-
ly and the Ruskin one dislikes at the beginning becomes a pathetic crea-
ture in old age, the victim of repressions and misguided parental training.
A most unusual yet ably done portrait of the art critic and writer.
PLAIN PEOPLE, by E. W. Howe.
Here is a vast store of interesting yet unrelated anecdotes in the life
of the plain people plainly told by the editor of the Atchison Globe. Ed.
Howe has seen tremendous changes in the world since he first wrote "The
Story of a Country Town" and this book is a sort of summary of his expe-
riences and reflections as written in the Globe.

He: "What recent volume is related by title to two prominent motor
car companies ?"
She: "I can't guess."
He: "Elizabeth and Essex."

LIBRARY NOTES
LIBRARIAN.
Willard P. Lewis who has been librarian at New Hampshire since
1919 has resigned to become librarian of the new Olin Memorial Library at
Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut. He is an alumnus of Wes-
leyan. He will be succeeded at New Hampshire by William W. Shirley, a
graduate of Dartmouth College and Pratt Institute Library School, New
Hampshire born and bred, and at present a reference assistant in the
Economics Division of the New York Public Library. Mr. Shirley's
mother, Mrs. Barron Shirley, is the librarian of the public library at
Franklin, New Hampshire.

BOOK NOTES
PULITZER PRIZE.
The Pulitzer prize in fiction for 1928 has been awarded to Dr. John R.
Oliver, author of "Victim and Victor," and "Fear; the Autobiography of
James Edwards."
EDUCATION INDEX.
The latest periodical index to be started by the H. W. Wilson Company
is the Education Index, indexing as its name implies those periodicals,
journals and proceedings of societies covering the fields of education and
psychology.
MAY LAMBERTON BECKER.
Mrs. Becker already widely known as the Readers' Guide of the Satur-
day Review of Literature has accepted in addition the post of book review
editor of the Youth's Companion.








LIBRARY SCIENCE
THE HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY, by Hannah Logasa.
Among the objectives towards which high school libraries should work
are the correlation of the subject matter of the various departments of the
school, the guidance of the students' leisure reading and their instruction
in the use of books and libraries. Aside from the administration offices it
is the only department which ministers to all the students. This volume is
a mine of information and suggestion for the high school librarian.

FOR CHILDREN
ALL ABOUT ME, by John Drinkwater.
"Me" is a little girl-just any little girl who likes to play and have
lots of fun and sometimes to be quite, quite naughty. Mr. Drinkwater has
written these rhymes about the things "Me" says, does and thinks, and
little folks will enjoy them and love the clever pictures.

FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME
DARK HESTER, by Anne Douglas Sedgwick.
When two generations and temperaments clash it is usually due to
mistakes on both sides. Hester's conflict with her mother-in-law is there-
fore inevitable, but with sympathy for both and brilliant characterization
the author brings them together at last.
KNUCKLES, by Clarence B. Kelland.
"Knuckles" is a refreshing character, a shrewd man up in the Ver-
mont lumber regions, a close-mouthed, keen-eyed observer of human na-
ture, astute enough to probe to the depths of the baffling Perrigo brothers
who had always kept their neighbors guessing.
THE PROFESSOR'S WIFE, by Bravig Imbs.
Highly amusing though formless reminiscences of an academic house-
hold and the social life of a small college town. The latter might be
Durham but it is probably Hanover.
THUMBCAP WEIR, by Frances Gillmor.
Something a bit new in fiction. A delightful young Scotch couple
among the weir fisheries of the Bay of Fundy, and a half-witted rival who
does his wicked worst to compass their destruction.

RECENT ACCESSIONS IN ART
Berenson-Painters of the Renaissance (Central Italian, Florentine, North
Italian, Venetian) -759.5-B489v.
Berenson-Study and criticism of Italian art-759.5-B489s.
Chase & Post-History of sculpture-730.9-C489.
Crowe & Cavalcaselle-History of painting in Italy-6v.
Crowe & Cavalcaselle-History of painting in North Italy-3v.
Mather-History of Italian painting-759.5-M427.
Merezhkowskii-Romance of Leonardo Da Vinci-M562.
Speltz-Styles of ornament from prehistoric times to the nineteenth cen-
tury-740-S743.
Vasari-Lives of painters, sculptors, and architects-709.45-V328.
Venturi-Short history of Italian art-709.45-V469.




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