Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00011
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: January 1929
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text






THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning
Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshirp
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLARD P. LEWIS, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Volume Four, Number Four Monthly from October to June

JANUARY, 1929

"Books are the true levelers. They give to all who faithfully use
them, the society, the spiritual presence, of the best and greatest of
our race." -W. E. Channing.

BRILLIANT BIOGRAPHY
ELIZABETH AND ESSEX, by Lytton Strdchey.
Behind the scenes of Elizabeth's glorious reign and England's ex-
panding power, lurked the cruelty and discomfort of sixteenth century life
and the constant intrigue and conspiracy at court. In an unusually worth
while presentation of this bygone age, the author of "Queen Victoria" tells
it all in a brilliant, scintillating style, and one follows with interest the
delineation of the Virgin Queen and the tragedy of her personal life and
relations with Essex. Minor characters hovering on the scene include
Francis Bacon, whom the author very evidently dislikes, Sir Walter
Raleigh, the Cecils, Earl Howard and Thomas Bodley.
IN THE FAMILY
EARLY LIFE OF THOMAS HARDY, by Florence Emily Hardy.
Contemporary notes, diaries, letters and memoranda have helped to
give an interesting picture of this man who prepared for architecture as a
vocation, wrote fiction to support his family and composed poetry as the
outpourings of his lonely imaginative soul, as presented in this volume by
one who was first his secretary and later his second wife. Among the
interesting incidents recorded are the romantic meeting and courtship with
his first wife while rebuilding the church at St. Juliot, The submission of
the manuscript of his first, lost novel "The Poor Man and the Lady," and
its criticism by Alexander Macmillan, Thomas Carlyle and George Mere-
dith, and the rise and development of his greatest novel, "Tess of the
D'Urbervilles." The first volume comes to an end with the appearance
in book form of "Tess," the results of which were to have a great influence
on his later life and writing.

THE BOOKS OF OUR GRANDFATHERS
QUEER BOOKS, by Edmund Lester Pearson.
An examination of popular reading fifty years ago which discloses a
naive American mind, at least as to literature, a mind that could be thrilled


S 44 It Am








by bombastic language, exaggerated sentiment melodramatic situations
and a crude writing that seem extremely amusing to us today. Among
the Queer Books are temperance novels, books of etiquette, and "Alonzo
and Melissa," of unknown authorship, first published in 1811, a best seller
for sixty years, and "for many readers their first experience with a ficti-
tious story." One of the most interesting chapters is "A Yankee Casanova,"
which deals with the Narrative of Henry Tufts, born at Newmarket in
1748, a clever and ingenious rogue whose favorite jail was in Exeter.
Most of these books are now rare.

"And some are dear as friends, and some
We keep because we need them;
And some we ward from worm and thumb,
And love too well to read them.
My own are poor, and mostly new,
But I've an Elzevir or two."
-Monkhouse.

MIND IN THE MAKING OR UNMAKING
THE TREASON OF THE INTELLECTUALS, by Julien Benda; trans-
lated by Richard Aldington.
Political passions have become universal, coherent and therefore
more intense in the last century. The "clerks"-philosophers, men of reli-
gion, men of literature, artists, men of learning-are responsible for this
glorification of patriotism, an emotion founded originally on self-interest
and pride. Most of the moral and political attitudes adopted by the
"clerks" of Europe are of German origin. Peace can only be attained if
men adopt abstract principles of humanity and justice superior to their
egotisms.
THE TWILIGHT OF THE AMERICAN MIND, by Walter B. Pitkin.
There are at present three times as many men of high intelligence as
there is adequate employment. In 1975 that ratio will be increased. Men
should never be given employment which others of less ability can do
equally well. Eugenics may improve the race to the increasing difficulty of
employing it. The application of business methods to all professions will
bring about a "grade B Utopia" while the yearnings for a "grade A
Utopia" will spread discontent.

FICTION FOR THE NEW YEAR
THE BABYONS, by Clemence Dane.
Crisp, concise and moving story of an English family, beginning
with Sir James Babyon who jilted his mad cousin Hariot to marry her
companion. Hariot shot herself and haunted Jamie on his wedding tour,
and from that time there was a brooding restlessness in the Babyon men.
Jamie killed himself, Isabella left her brother and lover dead and fled with
the gypsies, and her own gypsy daughter's daughter married back into the
legitimate branch to add a gypsy strain. The characters represent five
generations, from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, lovable and
living people, whose careers are followed with concern and sympathy.








SQUAD, by James B. Wharton.
Picturing life in the War as experienced by the eight members of
the Last Squad of the Fourth Platoon of M Company. One by one they
drop out, wounded, shell-shocked, killed in action. To the bitter end they
fight without hatred except when one of their "buddies" gets "bumped off."
MY BROTHER JONATHAN, by Francis Brett Young.
Ignored by his parents and out-shone by his idolized brother, Jona-
than Dakers becomes a doctor and goes to Wednesford to practice with old
Doctor Hammond. Believing Harold killed overseas, he marries Edie to
save Harold's name from disgrace, but Rachel is the one he really loves.
Harold returns and affairs are straightened out-too late.
ABBE PIERRE'S PEOPLE, by Jay W. Hudson.
The humblest incidents of everyday life among the Gascon peas-
antry are told with a charm and tenderness and simple artistry which
denote the author tho he be of an alien race as one having an understanding
heart and great literary ability. The Abbe will take his place among the
well-known characters of fiction.
THE CASE OF SARGENT GRISCHA, by Arnold Zweig.
A vivid portrayal of the Great War centering around a humble Rus-
sian peasant soldier taken prisoner by the Germans who escapes and is re-
captured. Grischa is symbolic of the spirit of the common soldier revolting
from the hell which has been imposed upon him-a revolt which resulted
ultimately in defeat for the Germans and the over-turning of the Russian
monarch. A book full of seething, living humanity and an interpretation
of a changing world.
WHAT EVERY BODY WANTED, by Elsie Singmaster.
"How an eligible man, a red-headed boy, a stranger with a limousine
and three fascinating ladies got what they wanted." A strange cul-
mination considering the fact that the handsome mother and her two
daughters each fully intended to marry Lucien Clement.
THE MAN FROM THE RIVER, by G. D. H. and Margaret Cole.
An English mystery yarn of intricate weaving which requires
several villains of prominence-the country squire, the local police surgeon,
the leading member of a prominent business firm as well as a footman, and
a financial defalcation as well as a love motive. Inspector Wilson of Scot-
land Yard postpones his vacation to unravel the tangled threads and bring
the culprits to justice.

LIBRARY NOTES
CIRCULATING MAGAZINES.
Commencing with the new term, one copy each of the current issues
of the following magazines will be available for a circulation with a seven
day limit-American Magazine, Atlantic, Century, Forum, Harpers, Liter-
ary Digest, Ladies Home Journal, Nation, New Republic, Outlook, National
Geographic, Scribners, Womans Home Companion.
NEW BOOK EXHIBIT.
A group of new books will be on exhibit for one week on a table in
front of the charging-desk and will be released for circulation at eight
A. M. on Thursdays.








NOTED AUTHORS.
Hermann Sudermann, German dramatist, died November 21st at the
age of seventy-two.
Elinor Wylie, American poet and novelist, died December 17th. She
was the wife of William R. Benet, well-known literary critic.

MORE BOOKS
MAN THE MIRACLE MAKER, by Hendrick Van Loon.
This is a cleverly written survey of man's continual attempts to pro-
ject the abilities of his five senses so that he may have more leisure time.
Mr. Van Loon's presentation of these historical facts is in his own enter-
taining and amusing style.
THE WORLD DOES MOVE, by Booth Tarkington.
"It was a quiet world, a respectable world, completed, unhurried,
unpuzzled, unrebellious." This is the keynote to the life our fathers knew
at the "fin de siecle." The advent of the automobile, the passing of the
hour-glass mode of ladies fashions, the adoption of jazz, the provincials
adjustment to the incoming newness in art, theatre, literature, all these
are commented on in the delightful popular style of the "Midlander." The
same period that Mark Sullivan treated in "Our Times" is covered in an
entirely different manner which should appeal to the hurried reader.
PILGRIMS OF ADVERSITY, by William McFee.
"When men have marched to war and have plowed the ocean to-
gether, their friendship, if it endures lies very much too deep for speech."
These pilgrims sail together in the Caribbean, visit Central American
countries and experience the filibusters and insurrections and lovely
senoritas of that part of the world with plenty of color and incident, in
McFee's fine writing.
MEET GENERAL GRANT, by William E. Woodward.
No hero worship here, but a vivid picture of the Civil War and a
sharply critical recital of the doings and misdoings of Ulysses S. Grant. He
is accorded "only" common sense, mechanical genius and dogged persever-
ance without military strategy. Yet he wins thru a desperate war and eight
years of troublous reconstruction and is twice elected to the presidency.
THE WAY IT WAS WITH THEM, by Peadar O'Donnell.
It was a simple way with them as described in this new Irish narra-
tive-the everyday life of humble islanders-and yet the telling is full of
beauty and pathos and runs the whole gamut from the more serious phases
of life down the silly and trivial.

CREATIVE READING
The library is now receiving Creative Reading, a semi-monthly dis-
cussion and analysis of current books issued by the Institute of Current
Literature. It is on file in the librarian's office where it may be examined
but not drawn for use outside of the building.

AT THE CHARGING-DESK
"Have you Bunyan's Iliad?"
"Is the New Testament in the Bible?"
"Have you got that book on bridge by Louis Rey?"




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