Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00010
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: December 1928
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning
Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLARD P. LEWIS, Librarian
"Entered asecond-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."
Volume Four, Number Three Monthly from October to June

DECEMBER, 1928

"Heap on more wood-the wind is chill;
But let it whistle as it will,
We'll keep our Christmas merry still."
-Scott.

BOOKS FOR CHRISTMAS
THEODORE ROOSEVELT'S DIARIES OF BOYHOOD AND YOUTH.
An extraordinary youth with the normal play interests of the child
coupled with the divers interests of an older person, shows in his daily
journal the beginnings of those traits of character which were so strikingly
individualistic in his later years. The qualities of mature judgment and
keen accurate observation on the events about him are an integral part of
his writings. Begun at the age of ten years and continued thru his first
year at Cambridge these childhood diaries give glimpses of the Roosevelt
family at home and traveling. Not a small part of their interest lies in the
illustrations which are photographs and facsimiles of the author's draw-
ings and letters.
CHARLES DICKENS, a biography from new sources, by Ralph Strauss.
Charles Dickens, whose privilege it was to live "a sort of exag-
gerated novel himself," has been presented in this biography with sym-
pathy and discernment. Since Dickens has been identified so often-and
convincingly with the characters of his novels, it is refreshing to find him
here a really talented, impulsive, hot-tempered man whose greatest diver-
sion was to organize amateur theatricals, and whose greatest cross was the
continual improvidence of his father's family. And while it is perhaps
distressing that he catered to his public it is also true that he cared enough
for his great audience to please it.
THE SLYPE, by Russell Thorndike.
This book is the English mystery story at its best. The very title
is intriguing. What is a Slype? It might well be a long, sinuous animal like
a weasel; or perhaps a sneak thief; or even a slimy and poisonous worm.
It turns out, however, to be none of these things but a narrow bricked
passage bounded by walls thirty feet high and six feet thick, between the
cathedral and the chapter house. This is the kind of a mystery story the
American can not write. It is a story laid within the cathedral close and
involving exclusively the dean and chapter and their families and de-
pendents. Moreover the cathedral is obviously that at Rochester, sacred
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to mystery since Edwin Drood, and the villains make their dash for free-
dom down the lower Thames, sacred to melodrama since Great Expecta-
tions. The Slype is what Trollope, Dickens, de Morgan, Fletcher and
Walpole might have produced could they all have labored together. This
story has been written by one of those rare souls who can deftly mix farce
and melodrama. And in the night a terrifying shriek comes from the quite
empty Slype. Can one ask more? (Book review by Prof. H. H. Scudder).
JOHN CAMERON'S ODYSSEY, transcribed by Andrew Farrell.
This is the real yarn of a real tar in the days of sails and chanteys
and much rum, the autobiography of a brave and resourceful man who re-
counts his marvelous adventures with minute detail. His Odyssey will be
relished by lovers of sea life all over the world.
ORLANDO, by Virginia Woolf.
Orlando is thoughtful, melancholy and introspective, an embodi-
ment of the English literary mind and spirit. He was a boy in the time of
Queen Elizabeth, and a favorite at her court, an ambassador to Turkey in
the time of Charles II; then, metamorphosing to a woman, she travelled
with a gipsy tribe and returned to England to become a writer and
patroness of literature. The story is brought down to 1928, when Orlando,
has lived thru 300 years of varying social and political conditions, 36
years old and has attained an interesting philosophy and literary success.
A witty and brilliant book, founded on a fantasy but fundamentally
serious, with vivid descriptions of the changing manners and mental out-
look of three centuries.
THE FALL OF THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE, by Edmund A. Walsh.
A brief outline of the outstanding events of Russia's history-its
rise, revolution and fall, is here combined with the personal observations
of Dr. Walsh, resulting in a very readable narrative. The author at times
becomes dramatic, but such has been Russia's career, and the book is never
tiresome. Many familiar figures, including Lenin, Rasputin, Nicholas II
and Trotsky, appear on the canvas.
FRANCOIS VILLON, by D. B. Wyndham Lewis.
"Nobody," said Dr. Johnson "can write the life of a man, but those
who have eat and drunk and lived in social intercourse with him." The
author of this new biography of the greatest medieval poet may figuratively
come in this category. A thorough student of the Middle Ages and of his
subject, he writes with understanding, enthusiasm and admiration. Vil-
lon-Master of Arts of the University of Paris, drunkard, defiler of women,
housebreaker, street brawler, jailbird, yes, even murderer-kept undim-
med the fire of genius. The Long and the Short Testaments are all that
remain of his works, and these are written with the clarity, relief and vigor
of the masters. To the biography are appended both French verses and
English translations designated as "The cream of the Testaments."

RECENT MYSTERY STORIES
C555me-Christie-Mystery of the blue train.
C941se-Crofts-Sea mystery.
F459n-Fielding-Net around Joan Ingilby.
F6135w-Fletcher-Wrist mark.
F8552a-Freeman-As a thief in the night.
M398pr-Mason-Prisoner in the opal.
T499s-Thorndyke-The slype.
W189ce-Wallace-The clever one.








THE BOOK OF THE HOUR
WHITHER MANKIND, edited by Charles A. Beard.
In defence of modern civilization Mr. Beard and his collaborators
have combined to hurl defiance at the defeatist philosophy of Messrs.
Belloc, Chesterton, Keyserling, Spengler, Wells, etc. In the thought of
Hu Shih, young Chinese philosopher there is little of the spiritual in the
backward civilizations of the East when the Chinese coolie's waking hours
are filled with exhaustion and pain and the Hindu world is degraded
by child marriage and disease.
The sections of the book though varying in merit are all thought
provoking and on a wide variety of topics including Business, Medicine,
Education, Philosophy, Religion, Science, Labor, Literature, the Arts, Law
and Government, and while not oblivious to the evils of the modern order,
yet do not concede "that any other system, could it be chosen in place of a
machine civilization, would confer more dignity upon human nature, make
life on the whole richer in satisfactions, widen the opportunities for
exercising our noblest faculties, or give a sublimer meaning to the universe
in which we labor."

A PICTURE OF THE PAST
LEONARDO THE FLORENTINE, by Rachel A. Taylor.
This life of Leonardo da Vinci portrays not only the great Floren-
tine himself but all the Renaissance background of the cities of Florence
and Milan in which he lived and worked. We see the painter himself as
he works on Mona Lisa and other famous works and we see other famous
painters of the period-Botticelli, Michelangelo, Perugino, and the younger
Raphael and Andrea del Sarto. Written in a vivid, colorful style, the
author has done full justice to the great men and great period which she
describes.

BOOKS AND AUTHORS
UNITED STATES CATALOG.
The new United States Catalog of Books in Print on January 1,
1928, has been issued and is much the most complete and serviceable biblio-
graphic tool of its kind in existence. 190,000 books in print are recorded
by 570,000 author, title and subject entries. The volume contains 25
pounds of bibliographic information and has 3,150 three column pages.
In addition to the information given in preceding volumes of the series it
contains Decimal Classification numbers for many of the books listed.
NEW BRITANNICA.
The fourteenth edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica has been
announced for the summer of 1929. It will be a revision of former editions
containing many new articles.
DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY.
The first volume of the Dictionary of American Biography published
by the American Council of Learned Societies has been issued from the
press.
NOBEL PRIZES.
Henri Bergson has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for
1927 and Sigrid Undset the Prize for 1928.








COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION AND TEACHING
A READING LIST
378-A583-Angell-The campus.
378.1-A748-Arnett--College and university finance.
506-N27 v.52-Aydelotte-Honors courses in American colleges and uni-
versities.
378.08-B469-Ben-Columbus,-undergraduate.
371.945-B873-Brooks-Reading for honors at Swarthmore.
378.113-C595-Clark-Discipline and the derelict.
378.18-D649-Doermann-The orientation of college freshmen.
378.08-E26-Edwards-Undergraduates.
378-G283-Gavit-College.
378-H392-Hawkes-College-what's the use?
371.3-H883-Hudelson-Class size at the college level.
378-H884-Hudelson-Problems of college education.
378.1-K29-Kelly-The American arts college.
378.01-K29-Kelly-The effective college.
378-K29-Kelly-Tendencies in college administration.
378-K59-Kirkpatrick-The American college and its rulers.
371-K63-Klapper-College teaching.
378-M364-Marks-Which way Parnassus?
378-M482-Meadows-Function of a state university.
378.04-M512-Meiklejohn-Freedom and the college.
371.3-P935-Pressey-Research adventures in university teaching.
378-R532-Richardson-A study of the liberal college.
378.73-R649-Robertson-American universities and colleges.
371.3-R754-Rollins college-The two hour conference plan.
371.3-R899-Ruch-College qualifying examinations.
371.3-S439c-Seashore-College placement examinations.
371.3-S439r-Seashore-Recognition of the individual.
378-S892-Stowe-Modernizing the college.
378.113-T548-Thwing-The college president.
378-W684-Wilkins-The changing college.

LIBRARY NOTES
OPEN HOUSE.
The library wishes to thank herewith all who contributed so gener-
ously to its Open House on the evening of November 14th. Eleven hundred
and seventy-two students, faculty and townspeople attended. Forty chil-
dren came to the Story Hour on the 16th.
CIRCULATION.
All records were broken for the circulation of Reserved Books in
the month of October with a figure of 9,982. This figure exceeds the
number for the entire year 1918-19 of 8,493.
EASTERN COLLEGE LIBRARIANS.
Mr. Lewis represented New Hampshire at the meeting of Eastern
College Librarians at Columbia University, Saturday, December 1st, and
read a paper on "The Purchase of Current Fiction for College Libraries."
POSTER CONTEST.
Nancy Babcock won the prize for the best book poster submitted in
the contest conducted among the school children and selected as her prize
Arthur Chrisman's "Wind That Wouldn't Blow."




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