Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00009
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1928
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning
Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLARD P. LEWIS, Librarian
"Entered as second-clas matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."
Volume Four, Number Two Monthly from October to June
NOVEMBER, 1928

NATIONAL BOOK WEEK---NOVEMBER 11 to 18
LIBRARY OPEN HOUSE, Nov. 14, 7.30-10 P. M. CHILDREN'S HOUR, Nov. 16, 4 P. M.
"He ate and drank the precious words,
His spirit grew robust
He knew no more that he was poor,
Nor that his frame was dust.
He danced along the dingy days,
And his bequest of wings
Was but a book. What liberty
A loosened spirit brings.'-Emily Dickinson.

BUNYAN TERCENTENARY
JOHN BUNYAN, by Gwilym O. Griffiths.
The author starts with Bunyan as "a shock-headed, red-haired little
devil" full of wild and evil ways. His reformation was brought about by
his bride whom he loved devotedly. In a few years he became "a fiery
gospeler with a stern and rough temper," who so annoyed the government
by his fearless ranting that he was imprisoned three times. In Bradford
Gaol he wrote much, including Pilgrim's Progress. He knew the latter
was a success but never discovered that he was the author of an English
classic.

FOR YOUNGER FOLK
BREAD AN' JAM, by Wymond Garthwaite.
A book of poems which will delight younger children as well as those
not so young. Written for the author's small daughter, they have the
same appeal which characterizes A. A. Milne's poems and children will
want to hear them over an' over, 'specially Bread An' Jam.
THE GOLDEN BIRD, by Katherine Gibson.
"The Golden Bird comprises ten legends from the great cultural pe-
riods of Egypt, Persia, China and France; tales for which the bard or
poet, the story-teller or singer of the time found innumerable listeners.
Presented here as swiftly moving narratives they will find a new and larg-
er audience."
THE REAL REWARD, by Christine Whiting Parmenter.
Perhaps one would think that living on a New Hampshire farm
couldn't be very exciting. But with the mystery of the stolen necklace and
the advent of the "Honorable uncle," the Meredith family, especially the
twins, have adventures aplenty.


, <.








TIME
NEW YEAR'S DAY, the story of the calendar, by S. H. Hooke.
The origin of time divisions and the calendar back in the early days of
human history was closely allied to the development of social divisions
among the people and speech and writing as a means of social intercourse.
The division of time into months and days occurred in places as widely
apart as Egypt, Persia, and the Maya, civilization in Central America,
and scientists are still uncertain as to whether the calendar had a common
origin.

REVOLUTIONIST
LENIN, by Valeriu Marcu.
Regardless of whether your sympathies are for or against the Russian
government of the present day, you must admit that Nikolai Lenin belongs
in that category of noble souls who faithful to their beliefs have founded
new and hitherto untried governments and given themselves for their
causes. This volume written by an internationalist who knew his hero
presents the story of his life in an unusual manner, the world in which he
moved, and throws some light on the strange personality of the man him-
self.


OUR NEIGHBOR SOUTH OF US
MEXICO AND ITS HERITAGE, by Ernest Gruening.
After five trips to Mexico in as many years, continued contacts and
study of Mexican history and literature, the author gives a full and factual
presentation of the Mexican situation. Emphasis is laid upon the politi-
cal and social background of the Spanish conquest and on the handicap of
the Indian heritage. The agrarian and religious conflicts are treated at
length, an economic basis is shown for overshadowing militarism and local
contemporary politics as they appear in various Mexican states. Has an
excellent bibliography and index.


UNDERWATER
BENEATH TROPIC SEAS, by William Beebe.
Sitting on the bottom of the sea near picturesque coral reefs, the au-
thor studied life in the vicinity of Haiti. Small animals of varying bril-
liant colors inhabit the coral reefs and afford much delight to one interested
in submarine science. A nursery of tarpon, sea anemones, jelly fish,
sponges filled with other living creatures such as snapping shrimp that
can be heard fifty feet away are some of the unusual sights afforded the
deep sea diver.
Glimpses of the writer's personality are caught in unexpected para-
graphs especially in the two closing chapters on bird life in the region.


FEEDING THE WORLD
HUNGER FIGHTERS, by Paul de Kruif.
Admiring and enthusiastic essays on a dozen scientists, "hunger-
fighters," whose discoveries either provided more food or controlled the
diet deficiency diseases which the author calls the hidden hunger. Among







them is Carleton who introduced Russian wheat to grow big crops on the
dry Western plains; Dorset, who weathered sneers and disappointment but
found a cure for hog cholera; Saunders, the successful druggist, first head
of the Canadian Experiment Stations, and with his farmer assistant Mac-
kay, the breeder of Marquis wheat; Steenbock, who discovered the strange
nutritional value of the sun's rays; and Goldberger, whose work wiped out
pellagra.
Patient plodding, keen observation, reasoning and chance all played a
part in the discoveries. These men were leaders. Their personalities and
methods have been an inspiration to innumerable scientists and their
work of inestimable value.

BOOK AND LIBRARY NOTES
ANNIVERSARIES.
John Bunyan, born November 30, 1628.
Ivan Turgenev, born November 9, 1818.
Oliver Goldsmith, born November 10, 1728.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO BIBLIOGRAPHY
BIBLIOGRAPHY, by H. B. Van Hoesen and F. K. Walter.
An encyclopedic compendium of bibliography, practical enumerative
and historical, using the word in its widest possible sense and based on the
teaching experience and notes of the authors. Of tremendous value to the
library profession.
HISTORY OF PRINTING, by J. C. Oswald.
Of unusual worth are the illustrations and the chapters relating' to
incunabula and early printers in the various countries and cities in this
volume of painstaking research. Little attention is paid to the Gutenberg-
Coster controversy but Alden, Jenson, Plantin and their fellows are well
covered.
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE NEGRO IN AFRICA AND AMERICA, by
Monroe N. Work.
An extensive and thoroughgoing bibliography aided by grant from
the Carnegie Corporation, and including over 17,000 references, this com-
pilation includes not only material relating to the present day but also that
covering the historical and anthropological background. Of unusual im-
portance to all students of the negro and race problems.

THE ELECTION.
In connection with the coming election have you read-
The Democratic Party, by F. R. Kent.
The Republican Party, by W. S. Myers.
Dictionary of American Politics, by E. C. Smith.
Herbert Hoover, by W. H. Irwin.
Alfred E. Smith, by H. F. Pringle.
FIRST EDITIONS.
The Publishers Weekly has recently been publishing a series of ar-
ticles on "First Editions of Today and How to Tell Them," with notes
from the various publishers. In the majority of cases the publishers make
no special note to indicate a first edition other than to specially designate
all other printings and editions under the copyright note on the page back
of the title-page.








A NEW HAMPSHIRE AUTHOR
ANIMAL HEROES OF THE GREAT WAR, by Ernest Harold Baynes.
A graphic picture is presented of the service rendered the allied armies
in the Great War by dogs, mules, horses, pigeons, camels and other animals
and full tribute is paid to their value. For years the author made his home
on a vast game preserve in New Hampshire and was a friend and neighbor
not only to the tamer and gentler animals but also to wolves, foxes and
bears. His Bird Sanctuary at Meriden remains a monument to the man
who loved all "Bird Guests."

CURRENT VERSE
GOOD MORNING, AMERICA, by Carl Sandburg.
Despite the somewhat unkempt exterior there is much of real feeling
and true poetry running thru this collection of free verse. In the initial
piece which furnishes the title, pride and patriotism fairly bursts forth
even if at times there is a somewhat ironic questioning. If you are uncer-
tain as to what poetry is, note the definitions on the leaf following the title-
page, especially these-"Poetry is the achievement of the synthesis of hya-
cinths and biscuits," and "Poetry is the capture of a picture, a song, a flair,
in a deliberate prism of words."

CURRENT FICTION
BEAU IDEAL, by Percival Wren.
The last of the trilogy-Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; Beau Ideal-in
which John Geste continues his life of adventure, mystery, and romance in
the Legion in North Africa.
ALL KNEELING, by Anne Parrish.
Selfishness disguised as altruism, poverty of soul behind a beautiful
face, ability to manipulate other human beings with astonishing facility,
light satire of the popular lady novelist-make up the proverbial summer
novel slightly out of season.
STRANGE CASE OF MISS ANNIE SPRAGG, by Louis Bromfield.
Miss Annie Spragg dies in Brinoe, Italy, and her body is found marked
with the stigmata of the crucifixion. The amazing story of her life intro-
duces a dozen arresting characters and plots for a dozen novels. Not as
serious as the books of the author's American "panel" but an able and
humorous study of human nature.
A LANTERN IN HER HAND, by Bess Streeter Aldrich.
Abbie Deal lived her life and reared her children in Cedartown, Ne-
braska, where she experienced all the joys and sorrows, the pleasures and
struggles of pioneer life and was content. An enjoyable home story of life
and love.
A FOOL IN THE FOREST, by Anthony Pryde.
A jolly little yarn clean as a whistle, with schemes and scrapes, a
worth while girl, an adorable little minx, and Sam Smith.

"Sadie: I'm going out to buy a book.
Gertie: A Book! What on earth are you going to do with a book?
Sadie: Oh, my husband bought me the most wonderful reading lamp
yesterday."-Life.




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