Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00003
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: January 1928
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
"Inside a good stout lantern hung its light"-Browning

Hamilton Smith Library, University of New Hampshire,
Durham, New Hampshire
WILLARD P. LEWIS, Librarian
"Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire,
under the act of August 24, 1912."

Volume Three, Number Four Monthly from October to June

JANUARY, 1928

USING THE TOOLS OF KNOWLEDGE
"All through the educational machine there is being produced a train-
ing in the ability to use the tools of knowledge, to use books and to use
libraries. More and more we are coming to realize that the duty of the
faculty in a university is that of inspiration to curiosity and in training
students how to satisfy that curiosity by means of libraries, laboratories
and other physical equipment. The temper in modern education is not to
run students through a mill in which they are told answers to questions
of which they have never heard, but rather to inspire them to ask questions
to give them a setting and a background and then let them learn of the
physical facilities by virtue of which they may answer the questions
themselves." -President Max Mason, University of Chicago.

READING
ADVENTURES IN READING, by May Lamberton Becker.
Here in the most readable pages are described those favorite books of
youth, which many have found to be enduring, some known by the reader,
others so warmly and alluringly commented upon that one is led to read
them. Books of fancy; novels old and new; books to dispel gloom-not the
"Pollyanna" type but the "Poetry Cure," or Jeffrey Farnol's novels; books
"for to admire, and for to see"-for those who travel and those who don't
-all these are mentioned in a most delightful manner. Mrs. Becker, the
Reader's Guide of the Saturday Review of Literature, has written these
charming comments on old and modern books, for all young folk who
would go adventuring in the book world.

RELIGION
WHAT CAN A MAN BELIEVE, by Bruce Barton.
Would the world be better or worse if it should abolish religion? Has
the church done more harm than good? Of the various religions now ex-
tant which is the best? What few simple things, if any, can a business
man believe?
Challenged to answer these questions honestly, Bruce Barton has
written a little volume which thinking doubters are reading with keen ap-
preciation. His novel comparison of church methods with business meth-
ods is illuminating. "Without change comes death."

G to
(V648
13








RUSSIA
THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION, by Lancelot Lawton.
Kerensky, Miliukov, Trotsky, Lenine, Kaminev, Stalin, the White
Army and the Red, the Mensheviks and the Bolsheviks, all these and many
others file across the stage in this narrative of Russia from the fall of the
Czar to the present time. In addition one finds social and political condi-
tions, family life, religion and the very psychology of the Russian people
set forth and keenly analyzed.

"Consider history, with the beginnings of it stretching dimly into the
remote time, emerging darkly out of the mysterious eternity, the true epic
poem and universal divine scripture." -Carlyle.

"OLD HICKORY"
ANDREW JACKSON, an epic in homespun, by Gerald W. Johnson.
His very fight for life was thrilling. His leadership in the Indian
wars and against the British in the battle of New Orleans displayed genius
of a high order. But his greatest achievements were accomplished in his
two terms as president of the United States, as the candidate and hero of
the rank and file of American democracy.

OUR TIMES
THE AMERICAN SONG-BAG, by Carl Sandburg.
The America of the present is built on the foundations of the past and
the very soul of her people has been expressed in her songs from "After
the Ball is Over" even down to the ballads of today.
AMERICA FINDING HERSELF, by Mark Sullivan.
Preeminent in the first decade of the nineteenth century are Roosevelt
and his Big Stick, the Wright brothers, the trust problem and pure food
agitation. Volume two of the history of the "Men on the Street" with its
host of detail and the picturesque presentation amply fulfills the promise
of volume one.
INDUSTRY'S COMING OF AGE, by Rexford Tugwell.
This country has suddenly achieved its majority in power and produc-
tivity, and now must consolidate these gains thru scientific management
and standardization if it is to keep its head amid the intoxication of
prosperity.


MIMICS
MARIONETTES, MASKS AND SHADOWS, by Winifred Mills and
Louise Dunn.
Have you sat before the Marionettes and wondered how the puppets
could be so real? The secret is revealed in this entrancing volume. Brief
sketches are given of the long-standing popularity of Punch and Judy
shows, of masks and shadow plays. While the volume was primarily
intended for high school students making their own puppet theatres, it has
an interest and fascination for any reader.








BOOKS AND AUTHORS
BOSWELL'S PAPERS AND LETTERS.
The valuable collection of Boswell's papers and letters which was
recently discovered at Malahide Castle, Ireland, and includes correspond-
ence with Burke, Johnson, Goldsmith, Pitt, Reynolds, Voltaire, and many
other celebrities, is to be published next May by the press of William
Rudge, in 12 volumes.
JOHN GALSWORTHY.
This famous British author has announced as his selection of the
world's twelve greatest novels-Don Quixote, Tolstoi's Anna Karenina and
War and Peace, Dostoievsky's Brothers Karamazov, Turgenev's Fathers
and Children and Smoke, Dickens' Pickwick Papers and David Copperfield,
Dumas' Musketeer Series, Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn and Tom
Sawyer, and Thackeray's Vanity Fair.
NOBEL PRIZE.
The Nobel Prize in Literature for 1926 has been recently awarded to
Signora Grazia Deledda, a native of Sardinia for her novels of Sardinian
life.
YALE UNIVERSITY.
As the result of a questionnaire among a representative group of Yale
undergraduates the following five books have been selected as making the
broadest appeal among current books to university men-Lehmann's
Dusty Answer, Davis' Show Window, Cather's Death Comes for the
Archbishop, Montague's Right off the Map, Cabell's Something About Eve.

THE PLAY'S THE THING
THE ROAD TO ROME, by R. E. Sherwood.
Hannibal has brought his army and elephants across the Alps and
is about to enter Rome as conqueror. The beautiful and clever Amytis,
wife of the Roman dictator, in an offhand way persuades him to change
his plans and Rome is saved to work out its own destruction. The char-
acters are modern and real, the dialogue fresh and delightful.
LAZARUS LAUGHED, a play for an imaginative theatre, by Eugene
O'Neill.
A highly emotional play of Bethany and Rome in the time of Tiberius
and Caligula. The cruelties and terrors of degenerate Caesars contrast
with the purity and fascination of Lazarus, raised from the dead and freed
from all fear. O'Neill is recognized as the foremost living American
dramatist.
ESCAPE, by John Galsworthy.
Galsworthy's farewell to the stage is sentimental melodrama concerned
with the escape of a "gentleman" convict from Dartmoor prison and the
reactions of the people who connive at the affair. Plenty of action.

"I have ever gained the most profit and the most pleasure also, from
the books which have made me think the most; and when the difficulties
have been overcome these are the books which have struck the deepest root,
not only in my memory and understanding, but likewise in my affections."
-J. C. and A. W. Hare-"Guesses at Truth."








THREE COLLEGE BOOKS
BURTON-EDUCATION AND THE DEMOCRATIC WORLD.
A challenge to our colleges and universities is contained in these
thoughts and observations of a university president on democratic educa-
tion in general and on the ideals and obligations of institutions of higher
learning and of those who have studied therein to the world round about.
HAWKES-COLLEGE--WHAT'S THE USE?
The personal experiences of Dean Hawkes of Columbia University
give a human touch to his observations on the everyday problems of college
life.
WILKINS-THE CHANGING COLLEGE.
The onward march of higher education brings new problems for solu-
tion and new methods of instruction which have a distinct tendency
towards greater concern for and work with the individual student.

FICTION OF THE HOUR
ADAM AND EVE, though he knew better, by John Erskine.
An un-Biblical Lilith, the perfect companion all men desire; Eve, the
domestic, fault-finding woman every man finds he has married; and Adam,
the pathetically innocent and idealist man, discuss life in the same dialogue
style employed in "The Private Life of Helen of Troy."
CHILDREN OF THE WIND, by Doris Peel.
Nellie Blythe was one of those peace and comfort loving women, al-
ways protected from distressing thoughts, and as a consequence she missed
all that was significant in the lives of the members of her family.
CONFLICT, by Olive Higgins Prouty.
A sensitive, compassionate little girl grows up to marry thru patriot-
ism a man utterly unworthy of her yet one whom she champions and loves
all too tenderly. By the grace of fiction and an early death all ends well.
SPLENDOR, by Ben Ames Williams.
A fine chronicle portraying with Mr. Williams' honest adherence to
detail, the development, struggles and ambitions of an interesting New
England boy from his earliest recollections thru his career as a journalist;
and his unselfish sister. Well and sympathetically done.

LIBRARY NOTES
BENJAMIN THOMPSON BOOKS.
Thru the kindness of Colonel Lynde Sullivan, the library has been
presented with eighteen volumes from the library of Benjamin Thompson
and bearing his signature on the fly-leaf.
INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATE.
As in the past the library is loaning material to high schools in the
state for the annual Interscholastic Debate on "The Independence of the
Philippines."
ROOMS 205 AND 207A.
Commencing with the winter term the Library will have the use of
room 205 on the second floor of the Library Building for Reserved book
readers, from twelve m. until ten p. m. Room 207A containing the New
Hampshire books will be closed for reading-room purposes.
BULLETIN BOARDS.
Attention is called to the new bulletin boards in the hall.




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