Title: Bulletin - Women's Trade Union League of Chicago
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089422/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bulletin - Women's Trade Union League of Chicago
Series Title: Bulletin - Women's Trade Union League of Chicago.
Physical Description: 46 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Women's Trade Union League of Chicago
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Chicago
Publication Date: October 1946
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Labor unions -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Labor unions -- Illinois -- Chicago   ( lcsh )
Women -- Employment -- Illinois -- Chicago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: V. 1-46, Apr. 1912-Nov. 1929
Numbering Peculiarities: Volume numbering irregular.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089422
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01815681

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630 S o u t h A s h 1 a d v a r d

Telephone Seeley: 1526 Chicago 7, Illinois
Vol. XXXVIII No. 10

OCTOBER 1946

OPEN HOUSE

THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 10, AT 8 O'CLOCK
At 630 South Ashland Boulevard

To meet the women guests and delegates attending
the American Federation of Labor Convention.

There will be a special program at 8:15, followed by refreshments.

The Women's Committee, appointed by the Chicago Federation of
Labor to plan the entertainment for the women guests attending tl(
American Federation of Labor Convention, arranged for the Open
House at our League so that the guests could visit our Club House
and meet the delegates and members of the Women's Trade Union
League of Chicago, as part of its official program of entertain-
ment.

We trust our members and delegates will attend and meet these dis-
tinguished guests.


AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR CONVENTION

The American Federation of Labor Convention will meet in Chicago,
for two weeks, beginning Monday, October 7, at the Morrison Hotel.
This is the first time that Convention has met in Chicago for 53
years, so it is a very great occasion for the Chicago Labor Mov-
mont.

The sessions will be open to the public. There will be a guests'
gallery for those wishing to visit the sessions.


CHRISTiMAS SALE PLANS UNDERWAY

jur annual Christmas Sale will be held this year on Saturday,
/December 7. Plans about the dinner will be announced later. The
preliminary plans are well under way and it is not too soon to r
mind our members to begin collecting and making articles for our
booths. We need well stocked booths because people come to buy
and if everyone would collect a few articles, that would do it.
i' iss iMargaret Mahr is Chairman again this year,






MORTGAGE FUND

The campaign to raise the $2000.00 necessary to clear off the
mortgage on our Club House at 630 South Ashland Boulevard,
started early in the year was very successful. We had hoped by
this time to be able to announce the fund raised but we were in-
terrupted in this work this summer. We need only $250.00 now to
clear our building.

Many of our members contributed,-some very generously, and these
gifts came in response to our appeal in the April Bulletin.
There are other members who may intend to contribute and now
that we have got down to the bottom of the barrel, we have to
scrape. However, $5.00 and $10.00 contributions could make up
the balance. .We hope it can be paid off soon.

The Unions gave the largest gifts and their contributions made
up the greater part of the fund we raised. Many outside.friends
contributed, too. They all responded very well. There are
still a few gifts pending.

.We are most grateful to all who contributed or assisted in any
way helping to raise this fund. It will be a memorable day when
we can burn the mortgage.


EQUAL RIGHTS AMENDMENT DEFEATED

Near the close of the 79th Congress, the so-called "Equal Rights"
Amendment was defeated, failing to secure the two-thirds vote re-
quired. This Amendment, as you know, if adopted, would destroy
the labor laws and other protective legislation for women..

While the proponents of this legislation pressed hard for the
passage of this Amendment, when it was about to be called they
tried to get it recommitted to Committee as they could see they
were facing defeat. Our side insisted it be called and the vote
"ended in a victory for us. It is interesting to find that
neither Senator Scott W. Lucas nor Senator C. Wayland Brooks
were recorded as voting on the Amendment. At least they did not
vote for it and we believe it was due to the good work-done
through our organizations throughout the State.

We still have to be on guard to see that the new candidates for
Congress are not misled by the term "equal rights" and allow
themselves to be pledged to vote for it.; Let us see that the
candidates are informed as to the dangers of this blanket legis-.
lation.


LEGISLATIVE VOTING RECORDS

The Joint Lgior Logislativ. Board of Illinois will issue its re-
port on thovoting records.of the Illinois Legislators and re-
commendations. They will also report on the voting records of
the members of Congress on labor bills. This information can be
secured through our office.


oeiu #28


October 1946j


Page 2





OF


WOMEN; TRADE UNIONISTS AND. AUXILIARY MEMBERS. .

Under Auspices of. the
. WOMEN S. TRADE .UNION LEAGUES.AND COMMITTEES. OF ILLINOIS AND WISCON SI N

FRIDAY EVENING AND SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25 and 26, 1946
'STEVENS HOTEL, CHICAGO
M- meetings in the West. Ball Robm, 3rd Floor,. '

FRIDAY. EVENING: Registration of Delegates, 7 to 8 O'Clock-


Opening of Conference -.- Rep

S.SATURDAY MORNING: -Continuing Reports of Delegates,


orts of Delegates.

S 10 O'Clock


SATURDAY NOON: LUNCHEON MEETING at 12:30, SOUTH BALLROOM, 3rd Floor
S' Luncheon, $2.82, including .tax and tip .

SPEAKERS::

Mrs. -Emily Taft Douglas, Illinois Congresswoman-at-Large'

i, .. Joseph Kelenan, Secretary: of the Chicago Federation '
Of Labor:
:ir. Keenan recently returned from Europe where.,he had the: assignment '
as Labor;.Advisor to, the American Military Governor :of Germany, where
he aided: in reorganizing the German labor movement in the American'
SZone.: He has a very interesting story.to'tell.

" SATURDAY AFTERNOON; 2:30

DISCUSSION. ON THE-NEnDED CHANGES:-.IN THE. SOCIAL SECURITY AGT:

SPEAKERS: .. .- --
Mr. Jack Elkin, Representative, Railroad Retirement Board

SMr. Robert Beasley, Regional Director, :Social Security
:Boa'rdl .
:The amendments passed at the:.close of -thid 79th: Congress to th Rail
road..Retirement Act make the pensions and other benefits for.rail-
"'"road workers the most comprehensive social security plan. inthe"' .
.country. You will have a chance to learn about it and to make a:
comparison with the Social Security Act. .CongresP failed: to pass
L:ny of the bills that would have extended the coverage or 'increase
'..the benefits under the Old Age and Survivors Insurance, :so it'isim-
portant that' we consider the changes needed in.the Social Security.' ,
;;Act to have the security the workers need.
Reservations for luncheon must be sent t'o our::office, 630 S'. Ashland
Boulevard,. not .later, than Thursday, October 24. "::.: .


S P ROG R 'A M.

INTERSTATE CONFERENCE.





4. IS THE FARE.R GETTING TOO ivUCH? Farm prices have risen considerably,. though not i
as much as would appear from a reading of the Chicago market quotations which apply
only to certain prime grades of cattle. Of the housewife s meat dollar, 530 went to
the farmer in 1935-1939. In May, 1.946 (under OPA) 770 went to the farmer. After CPA
went out,. did the farmer reap a bonanza? In April, 1947, the fanrer got .71. out of
the meat dollar, a decline of 6%, Even the rise from 530 to 710 is misleading be-
cause farm prices were in a state of dangerous decline inn 1935-1939, .rith an agricul-
tural crisis imminent. Although wholesale prices of meat went up 85- froui i'Aay 1946
to May 1947, farm meat prices went up only 55% in the same period.

5. HOW ABOUT THE PACKERS? Armour & Co. in 1945 made 9.3 million dollars (after
taxes), in 1946 '21 million dollars, an increase of 126%, although more than half the
year was under QPA control and volume of sales was reduced for a few months when the
packers were on strike to force the lifting of price control. The big four, Armour,
Swift, Cudahy and Itilson, recorded a total profit of $122,100,000 for 1946, more than
three times as much as they made in 1939, a return on each dollar of investment, 21.

More revealing is the change in the spread between the farn price and the wholesale
price. In June, 1946, the packer added 434 a pound to the farmers' price for beef.
In June, 1947, he added 16, an increase in'his margin of 242%. Only a negligible
amount of this is additional costs', the rest .just extra profits. In the same period,
the farmers' price rose 52% and the retailers' spread rose E 0, and both faniers' and
retailers' percentages were lower than earlier in the year.

Since June when prices of meat rose suddenly, no niew figures are yet available. This
much is clear, however. No economic cause for a price rise because of existing shor-
tages can be found.' Speculation and profiteering apocar to be the guiding reasons
for the drastic cut in the meat purchases we are all experiencing. The trend this
year has been for a drop in the share of the consumers dollar that goes to the fara-
er and to the retailer, and a sharpp increase in the share taken by the packer.

In the future, there may be some shortages. If profiteering could soar to such
heights with no economic cause, there is every reason to fear even worse conditions
later. Some people are suggesting that the cut in demand at these high prices will
bring prices down.' Tith the margins of profits now being rlade by the meatpacLers
however, they could afford to lose as much as 60O of their trade and still make more
money than they made in 1946, the best yePr in their history.

Price control did not cut profits, it prevented profiteering. It is clear that at
least for those industries where the health of ov.r co.Litry and the Savinh from star-
vation of millions of people of other lands are at stake, price control and profi-
teering control must immediately be restored. --Annie Stein
Memberr. I.W'TUL Legislative Committee

PUBLICATIOITS

UNITED NATIONS. Pamphlets: Structure of the United Tations; Basic Facts About the
United Nations. Leaflets What It Is; What It Does, How It T7orks. United Nations
Department of Public Information, Lake Success, New York, N. Y.

WOEN WORIERS. Women workers are the chief concern of the .'"TUL, and since the
League is without a research staff, we rely on the U.S. Women's Bureau for factual
data on employed women. "Women Workers in 1947" is comprehensive source material fur-
nished by the Women's Bureau, including data furnished by the Bureau of employmentt
Security, Social Security Administration. Copies of this document, mimeographed by
the League, provided invaluable background for discussion at the League's convention.
National Tfomen's Trade Union League, 317 Machinists Bldg. Washington 1,D.C. Price 25.

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