Title: Labor market trends : Key West.
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 Material Information
Title: Labor market trends : Key West.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida Industrial Commission. Florida State Employmment Service.
Publication Date: November 1951
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089401
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Full Text

Florida Industrial Commission


LABOR MARKET T I

Florida State Employment Service


November 1951


KEY WEST


Letter No. 10


NON-SEASONAL
FACTORS
RAISE
EMPLOYMENT
LEVEL







LABOR
SUPPLY
TIGHTENS AS
EMPLOYMENT
RISES









HUGE
BUILDING
THREATENED
BY LABOR
SHORTAGE








SEASONAL
EXPANSION
AHEAD


Marked increases in government and construction raised
the employment level in Key West 19 per cent since the
end of last year's tourist season in May. Manufacturing
and service establishments were still declining in
October, but wholesale and retail trade firms had started
hiring additional workers in anticipation of the approach-
ing winter season. A brisk year-round tourist trade has
kept employment in all industries fairly stable through-
out the summer and was a factor in the addition of a few
new firms to the business inventory. Government installa-
tions, representing the bulk of the area's payrolls,
scored an 8 per cent gain in civilian employment.
Had it not been for large gains in government and con-
struction, employment in the area would have dropped
slightly below the total for a year ago. This does not
mean that other industries have had a decline in business
activity, but does indicate a high degree of job-switch-
ing and a tight labor market. Government salaries,
generally higher in clerical occupations where much of
the expansion occurred, have attracted many workers away
from private industry. Unemployment has dropped down to
a minimum and is composed principally of sales and
service workers, most of whom will be absorbed in season-
ally expanding firms. Hotels, restaurants, and other
service and trade establishments are depending largely on
the usual inmigration of job-seekers to fill their labor
requirements for the winter months.
Except for the city's new steam electric plant con-
struction activity is largely concentrated in home build-
ing. Employment in the industry pyramided during the
past two months as several large projects got under way,
including 1,000 housing units for Naval personnel. Build-
ing permits topped $10 million after the record breaking
September total of $6,628,108 was added to this year's
figure. The industry is faced with an acute labor short-
age which threatens to retard building schedules unless
outside recruitment can be accomplished quickly.
Plumbers and common laborers are urgently needed now and
demand for other skilled tradesmen will grow as the
building progresses.

Judging by the volume of tourist inquiries and advance
reservations, Key West can expect a bonanza tourist
season this year that is likely to strain living accomo-
dations even after the addition of about 200 more motel


3 i') : 04
-vt


















EMPLOYMENT
AND WAGES
INCREASE
IN INSURED
FIRMS











WAGES PAID


rooms that will be ready this fall. Employers forecast
an 8 per cent increase in employment during the next two
months, excluding the large expansion in construction
which is difficult to measure at this time. Major gains
will occur in trade and service establishments, which
are the industries most responsive to seasonal variation.
Factory employment will edge upward, primarily in stone,
clay and glass products firms as demand for building
materials increase and in food processing with the
opening of the shrimping season in January,

A recent release of employment and wage data on firms
covered by the Florida Unemployment Compensation Law
reveals the growth of industry in Monroe County during
the past year. The first quarter of 1951, compared with
the first quarter of 1950, shows a gain-of 8 per cent in
the number of persons employed and 16 per cent in total
wages paid. Little change occurred in the proportionate
importance of the various industries to the total economy,
except for an increase in the ratio .of employees and
wages paid in service establishments accompained by a
corresponding decline in construction. From an income
point of view, based on wages paid during 1950, wholesale
and retail trade contributed most to the area, followed
by construction and service firms. A marked increase in
manufacturing resulted from a change in industry classi-
fication rather than expansion of factory payrolls.

BY EMPLOYERS COVERED BY THE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION LAW
MONR.OE COUNTY


'Nqes Paid During. F rst Quarter__ Per Cent
Industry 1951 19.50 Change

TOTAL .$ 900,340 $ 776,387 / 16.0
Construction 165,108 203,993 19.1
Manufacturing 96,253 55,980 / 71.9
Transportation, Communi-
cation & Public Util. 77,352 67,169 / 15.2
Wholesale & Retail Trade 299,370 267,925 i / 11.7
Finance, Insurance & Real
Estate 21,562 18,836 / 14.2
Service 240,695 162,434 i / 48.2


November News Letter
Released by:


J. H. Knight, Jr., Manager
Florida State Employment Service
Key West, Florida




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