Title: Manatee livestocker
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089230/00013
 Material Information
Title: Manatee livestocker
Series Title: Manatee livestocker
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Manatee County Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Manatee County Extension Service
Place of Publication: Palmetto, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089230
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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F UNIVERSITY o

UFIFLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION


MANATEE LIVESTOCKER


INSIDE THIS ISSUE:


Reproductive
Management School
Country of Origin
Labeling
Grazing Management
101
Grazing Management
School
Reproductive
Management School
Agenda
Beef Management
Calendar



CALENDAR
July 8-11 Livestock Eva
Camp
Aug 16 Maximizing the E(
tional Value of F
Youth Hog Show
Tampa
Aug 23 Grazing Manage
101-Okeechobe
Aug 23 Steer Weigh In
Sept 4-5 Grazing Manage
School
Sept 26 FCA Heifer Sale


2 l %LLIJ L LI V % IVIL
October 2
3
This school is sponsored by the Florida
3 Cooperative Extension Service and is
conducted with the assistance of area
4 large animal veterinary practitioners. It is
part of a continuing multi-county effort
to help South Florida beef producers
market more pounds of beef per cow
5 profitably.

The purpose of the school is to
strengthen managerial capabilities of
owners and operators of beef cattle
ranches. This is an intense school in re-
luation productive management of the cow herd.
Although the topic of pregnancy diagno-
duca- sis is given extensive treatment in the
lorida's program, participants should not expect
s- this training to make them proficient in
that skill. Rather it is hoped that an im-
ment proved understanding of the broad sub-
e ject of breeding herd management will be
achieved. Individuals enrolled in the
ment school will be better equipped to work


1-23, 2008

with their veterinarians in accom-
plishing breeding program objectives.

The school will be held October 21-
23, 2008 at the Turner Agri-Civic
Center in Arcadia. October 21 and
22nd the hours will be 8:00am-
6:00pm and on October 31 the hours
will be 8:00am-12:00 noon. The cost
of the course is a total of $350. A
$100 deposit is due by October 3rd
and is not refundable. The balance,
$250 is due October 21st.

The agenda for the course can be
found on page 4.

If you are interested in attending the
class you can find the forms at
http://manatee.ifas.ufl.edu/
agriculture/livestock/index.shtml or
by calling Christa, 941-722-4524.


Youth Livestock Evaluation Camp
July 8-11, 2008
9:30am-3:30pm
Manatee County Extension Office
Rogers Auditorium


The South Florida Beef Forage Program
2008
D ai Avf M t Sh U l' I*i r*






Manatee Livestocker


What is Country of Origin Labeling (COOL)?
By: Christa L. Carlson-Kirby
Extension Agent II, Livestock
Manatee County Extension Service
Department ofAgriculture & Natural Resources


Many producers and consumers have heard about
the Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) in regards
to Beef, Pork and Lamb products. However, the
law also includes fish, perishable agricultural com-
modities and peanuts. The first implementation of
the COOL Law came into effect in January 2004.
In this implementation the law required COOL for
farm-raised fish and shellfish. The law also de-
layed implementation of the balance of the com-
modities until September 30, 2006. In another law
on November 10, 2005, the balance of commodi-
ties requiring COOL was once again delayed until
September 30, 2008.

The 2007 Farm Bill has language in it specifying
that Beef, Pork and Lamb products from whole
muscle and ground meats must have a Country of
Origin Label by September 30, 2008. Since the
Country of Origin Label has been passed into ef-
fect, any animal born on or after July 15, 2008,
would have to have a signed affidavit from the sup-
pliers, markets, ect. to verify its country of birth,
production and processing. In other words when a
producer sells an animal they would then provide
production records or another affidavit to verify
country of birth to the person or location of which
they are selling their animal to. Sellers are respon-
sible for providing information on the animal's lo-
cations of production to the buyer.

The COOL law applies to all beef, pork, lamb,
fish, perishable agricultural commodities and pea-
nut products which are to be sold in a retail setting,
where the retailer is acquiring $230,000 or more
annually of that commodity regardless of their age


or gender. Any animal without country of
origin verification can only be used in a res-
taurant, cafeteria, food stand, or other food-
service venue. If an individual is selling less
than $230,000 annually on the commodity
product or if the retailer is selling processed
foods, they are not required to carry Country
of Origin Labels.

For a product to be labeled "US Origin" the
animal must be born, raised, and processed in
the US. To be labeled "Product of the US
and a Foreign Country of Origin" the animal
has originated in another country and was
raised and processed in the US. For a prod-
uct to carry the "Foreign Origin" Label the
animal and or product would be imported
into the US from a foreign country. Ground
meat products will require a label stating all
countries of origin which are in that ground
product.

Sources:
Agricultural Marketing Service. 2008.9 June
2008.

National Cattlemen's Beef Association. 2008.
9 June 2008.

"Country of Origin Labeling (COOL), July
2007". http:www.aragriculture.org 9 May
2008.
opics/COOL_July2007.htm>


Manatee County Fair Steer Weigh-In

Saturday, August 23, 2008

8:00am-11:00am


Page 2


t9USC.0






Volume 1, Issue 1


Grazing Management 101
August 23, 2008
Okeechobee County Extension Office


This course is sponsored by The South Florida Beef-
Forage Program of the University of Florida, Coop-
erative Extension Service. This course represents ba-
sic pasture management principles and concepts It is
part of a continuing multi-county education effort to
help South-Central Florida producers raise and mar-
ket high quality beef cattle, per cow, per acre, profita-
bly.
Grazing management is the manipulation of
livestock grazing to obtain defined outputs of live-
stock products. It involves careful management of
both pasture and livestock resources to meet desired
objectives. This course is offered in a two session for-
mat to offer basic pasture management principles
along with hands-on activities and demonstrations.
The theories of grazing management concepts and
pasture establishment methods are discussed in a
classroom setting during the first half of the day, and
the concepts taught are supported by practical appli-


cations in the field during the afternoon session.
The "Grazing Management 101" is offered
each summer and we encourage new farmers to at-
tend. Registration fee for this school is $ 20.00 if re-
turned by August 8, 2008, and $ 30.00 if returned
after August 8, 2008, or at the door. Registrations
should be returned to, and checks made payable to:
South Florida Beef-Forage Program
c/o Christa L. Carlson-Kirby, Treasurer
1303 17th St W
Palmetto, FL 34221

Anyone wishing to have more information may con-
tact, Christa L. Carlson-Kirby at the UF/UFAS
Manatee County Extension Office, 941-722-4524.


Grazing Management School
September 4-5, 2008
Hendry County Extension Office
Labelle


This school is sponsored by The South Florida Beef-
Forage Program of the University of Florida, Coop-
erative Extension Service. It is conducted with the
volunteer assistance of area livestock producers and
Allied Industries. It represents separation of the origi-
nal Forage and Pasture Management School into sub-
ject components that can be taught in a couple of
days. It is part of a continuing multi-county educa-
tion effort to help South-Central Florida producers
raise and market high quality beef cattle, per cow, per
acre, profitably.

Grazing management is the manipulation of livestock
grazing to obtain defined outputs of livestock prod-
ucts. It involves careful management of both pasture
and livestock resources to meet desired objectives.
This new course is offered in a two day session. The
theories of grazing management concepts and meth-
ods are discussed in a classroom setting during the
first day, and concepts taught are supported by practi


cal applications in the field during the second day
touring selected ranches in the area.

This is the third annual "Grazing Management
School" and we encourage you and your personnel
to attend. Registration fee for this school is $ 60.00 if
returned by August 8, 2008, and $ 80.00 if returned
after August 8, 2008. Registration forms and further
information can be obtained by contacting Christa,
941-722-4524 or by email, ccarlson@ufl.edu. Regis-
trations should be returned to, and checks made
payable to:
South Florida Beef-Forage Program
c/o Christa Carlson-Kirby, Treasurer
1303 17th Street West
Palmetto, FL 34221 l


'f


Page 3






Manatee Livestocker


Reproductive Management School Agenda


Tuesday, October 21, 2008

8:00 Introductions
8:30 Pregnancy Testing an' nod n x
10:00 Break b o
10:10 Quiet Handling of Beef Cattle -
11:00 Pregnancy Testing Video o
11:30 Lunch (provided)' wru.ane .
12:15 Intact Tracts Lab
1:00 Lab-Hands On Pregnancy Testing
3:30 Heifer Development and Management of Young Cows
4:15 Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation
5:30 Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation-Live Animal Demo

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

8:00 Genetic Management for Efficient Reproduction
8:30 Coping with Calving Problems
9:15 Breeding Season Management
9:45 Break
10:00 Health Management-Vaccination Program For Reproduction
10:30 Nutrition for Reproduction
11:15 Reproductive Implications of Body Condition and Nutritional Management
12:00 Lunch (Provided)
12:30 Lab-Hands on Pregnancy Testing
3:30 Utilizing Performance Records

Thursday, October 23, 2008

8:00 The Role of Artificial Insemination in Beef Cattle
8:30 Herd Bull Selection
9:00 Estrus Synchronization and Heat Detection
9:30 Break
9:45 Nutrition for Reproduction-Forage Quality
10:15 The role of Ultra Sound in a Beef Cattle Herd--
10:45 Program Summary and Evaluation
11:00 Hands On Lab-End of School


Page 4







Volume 1, Issue 1


Beef Management Calendar

July
Cut corn silage.
Control weeds in summer pastures.
Apply nitrogen to warm season pastures, if needed.
Check mineral feeder.
Check for army worms and mole crickets, and treat if necessary.
Wean calves and cull cow herd.
Watch for evidence of footrot and treat.
* Consider preconditioning calves before sale including vaccination for shipping fever and IBR at least 3 weeks
before sale.
Check dust bags.
Update market information and plans.
Revaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.
August
Treat for liver flukes as close to August 15th as possible, if they are in your area.
Cut hay.
Apply lime for fall and winter crops.
Harvest Bahiagrass seed.
Check mineral feeder.
Update market information and marketing plans.
Check for army worms, spittlebugs, and mole crickets, and treat if necessary.
Check dust bags.
Wean calves and cull cow herd.
Watch for evidence of abortions.
Observe animals regularly for signs of disease.
* If cattle grubs were found on cattle last winter or heel flies were observed in the pasture, treat for cattle grubs
this month.
Pregnancy test and cull open heifers from replacement herd.
September
Cut hay.
Heavily graze pastures to be interplanted to cool season pastures.
Check mineral feeder.
Check for mole crickets, spittlebugs, and grasshoopers, and treat if necessary.
Check dust bags.
Wean calves and cull cow herd if not already done. Remove open, unsound, or poor producing cows.
Train cowboys to observe normal and abnormal behavior and signs of disease.
Be sure any replacement purchases are healthy and have been calfhood vaccinated for brucellosis.
September or October is a good time to deworm the cow herd if internal parasites are a problem.
* When replacement heifers are weaned, give them required vaccinations and teach them to eat from a bunk -
Then, put them on a good nutrition program.
Determine bull replacement needs, develop selection criteria, and start checking availability of quality
animals.
Review winter feed supply and feeding plans so that needed adjustments can be made before supplies
tighten and prices rise.


Page 5







































The South Florida Beef Forage Producer Survey

Many beef cattle producers have received the South Florida Beef Forage Program Producer Survey. This sur-
vey is used to advise and guide programs provided by the South Florida Beef Forage Program. I will also use
this survey to develop and guide the Manatee County Livestock Program. If you have received a survey please
fill it out and return the completed survey by using the self addressed stamped envelope provided. I would like
to thank you advance for your assistance with this survey. Results of the 2003 survey can be found online at
http://sfbfp.ifas.ufl.edu.







Christa L. Carlson-Kirby
Extension Agent II, Livestock




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