Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: October 2008
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00041
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION


DeSoto County
Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
October 2008 / Volume 30 Number 10

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


Plan to Attend the Annual
Cattlemen's Meetin2


October
14-16 Sunbelt Ag Expo, Moultrie, GA

15 UF/IFAS Ona Range Cattle Research Center 2008 Weed Field Day

21-23 Reproductive Management School, Arcadia, FL

30 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Fall Meeting, Turner Center Exhibit Hall, 7:00 PM

31 1st Annual All Purpose Heifer Sale, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyard

November
7 2nd Annual All Breed Bull Sale, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyard

December
3-5 FCA December Quarterly Meeting, Ocala

12 Jorgensen Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyard

29 Special Slaughter Cow & Bull Sale, 12:00 Noon, Arcadia Stockyard

SURVEYS SHOW JAPANESE CONSUMER APPROVAL OF U.S.BEEF RISING
Surveys conducted on a statistically significant sample of Japanese consumers in March 2006 by Macromill showed that
the United States faced an uphill battle in regaining market share in the Japanese market for U.S. beef:
Only 7.7 percent of consumers surveyed considered the U.S. beef safety system to be "very credible" or
"somewhat credible."
Those who said the U.S. beef safety system was "not very credible" or "not at all credible" measured 72.5
percent.
Two years later, 24.7 percent of those surveyed say the safety of U.S. beef is "very credible" or "somewhat credible,"
while the number of dissenting opinions has been cut virtually in half- only 36.6 percent say it is not credible.
"This is an important movement in the Japanese marketplace," said Philip Seng, president and CEO of USMEF. "Prior to the discovery
of BSE in the United States, Japan alone represented nearly 43 percent of annual U.S. beef exports by volume (546,010 metric tons or
1.2 billion pounds), and that accounted for half of the value of all U.S. beef exports more than $1.8 billion." Source-Drovers Alert,
September 25, 2008 | Volume 10, Issue 39.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


I







MARKET INFORMATION
October 1, 2008


The summary below reflects the week ending October 3, 2008 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, October 7, 2008.
State Volume Steers Heifers
Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
TX 23,500 $99.37 $96.93 $93.92 $90.51 $91.56 $92.62
AL 11,100 $95-102 $87-93 $85-89 $83-89 $81-90 $75-84
TN 6,900 $96.32 $89.93 $89.46 $84.87 $82.62 $79.23
FL 8,900 $75-94 $77-87 $74-77 $70-88 $65-80 $65-67
GA 8,900 $85-98 $80-95 $80-89.50 $75-88 $70-85 $70-80
KY 24,500 $96.18 $94.41 $103.03 $85.67 $91.56 $86.68
OK 26,200 $110.81 $110.19 $109.47 $99.90 $100.45 $98.88
MO 23,000 $113.49 $109.96 $108.05 $98.45 $100.69 $99.50
CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 40 to 41 cents lower from 5.33-5.42 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 1.14 to 1.17 lower from 4.26-4.29 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 98 cents to 1.03
lower from 4.37-4.40 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 99 % cents to 1.18 % lower from 3.99-4.35 per
bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 1.03%-1.13 % lower from 4.19-4.24 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2
Yellow Corn rail was 1.02 % lower at 3.97 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday
October 3, 2008 http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







GRAIN CROPS-PLANTING AND GROWTH STATUS
Corn 96% had dented-9% harvested Barley 97% has been harvested
Soybeans 68% has dropped leaves-9% harvested Sorghum 35% is harvested
Winter wheat 42% has been planted Oats No Report
States with the worst pasture conditions-at least 27% of the acreage rated poor or worse-include: California (95%);
Kentucky (77%); Michigan (41%); Nevada (42%); North Dakota (48%); Ohio (41%) and Oregon (53%); Pennsylvania
(46%); Tennessee (47%); and Washington (40%).
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2008HTTP://DESOTO.IFAS.UFL.EDU/
YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
2008 1.87" 1.51" 2.52" 3.33" 2.55" 7.09" 6.79" 8.42" 2.69" ___36.77"
2007 1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 0.05" 0.78" 32.79"
2006 0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
2005 __ ___ _9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES (2 METERS) AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
HIGH 82.30 84.90 86.10 88.10 94.60 94.90 94.90 95.20 93.90 I INA
LOW 28.50 35.60 39.30 41.60 51.90 65.00 50.40 70.80 61.60 1NA
Rainfall for 2008 is currently 6.27 inches ahead of 2007

HORSE SLAUGHTER BILL MOVES FORWARD
A U.S. House of Representatives committee this week approved a measure that would ban the practice nationwide of
slaughtering horses for human consumption and halt the export of horses destined for consumption in other countries.
Animal-welfare groups have long campaigned for the horse slaughter ban, claiming the treatment of horses sold for
meat is cruel. They've already succeeded at forcing the closure of the three final U.S. horse slaughterhouses two in
Texas and one in Illinois. But since thousands of horses are still exported for slaughter in Canada and Mexico, and many
states have no laws that would prohibit the opening of new plants, the groups have been seeking federal regulation since
2001. The proposed legislation is the "Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act," sponsored by Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich.,
chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, and Rep. Dan Burton, D-Ind. The proposal would make it a crime
punishable by up to three years in prison to possess or transport horse meat for human consumption or horses intended
to be slaughtered for human meals. The Animal Agriculture Alliance called the proposal "horribly misguided and
misleadingly named." According to AAA, "multiple amendments intended to lessen the frightful negative impact the bill
would have on horse welfare were defeated along largely partisan lines." Opponents of the law, including many cattle
ranchers, horse breeders and veterinarians, believe the measure will have many unintended, inhumane consequences.
They say the now-defunct U.S. slaughter plants were regulated and inspected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture,
were run in a humane fashion and provided a necessary option to deal with unwanted horses. Since the closure of the
slaughter plants, reports of abandoned, neglected and starving horses have increased dramatically. Source-Drovers
Alert. September 25. 2008 I Volume 10. Issue 39.

Beef Management Calendar

October/November

Cut Hay. 1Check dustbags, oilers, etc.

Heavily graze pastures to be interplanted to ryegrass. Check pastures and hay fields for armyworms.

Check mineral feeder. ISurvey pastures for poisonous weeds.

Wean calves and cull cow herd. Check for external parasites, especially lice & treat.

Watch condition of cow herd and supplement if necessary. Determine bull replacement needs, develop selection
Post calving cows have the highest nutritional requirements criteria, and start checking availability of quality
in the first 82 days. I animals.

Plant cool season Ryegrass and small grains. IPlant cool season legumes.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







FARMERS' MARKETS GAIN POPULARITY
The number of farmers markets in the United States continues to grow, reports USDA's Agricultural Marketing
Service, reaching a total of 4,685 in August 2008. This represents a 6.8 percent increase since the same time last year.
AMS administrator Lloyd Day says fresh, locally grown foods, and the opportunity to interact with producers, attract
consumers to farmers' markets. Source-Food Systems Insider, E-Version, Friday, Sept. 26, 2008, Vol. 8, Issue 18

Arcadia Stockyards Market Report for September 3rd and October 1, 2008

$160.00

$140.00

$120.00
m Low Sept
$100.00 Low Oct
io High Sept
2 w High Oct
A $60.00 m Ae rage Sept

$ Average Oct

$20.00

$0.00
250-295 300-340 350-390 400-449 450495 500-545 550-595 600-630
Weight

I have created the above graph to give you an idea of the impact on the market locally over the past month. Only the
250--295 weight low September prices were better than the low October prices. For all other weights there was a
significant slide in prices. The article below reflects a lot of this on the national level. Jim!
FINANCIAL CRISIS AFFECTING AG COMMODITIES
The crises in global financial markets and confusion over potential government intervention have created extreme
volatility in U.S. stock markets, and economic uncertainty could spill over into agricultural commodities and prices.
According to a new report from economists with the American Farm Bureau Federation, the situation could moderate
global and domestic demand for U.S. farm products and intensify an already volatile price situation for both
commodities and the supplies that farmers must purchase. The report notes that the nation's agricultural sector is in
good financial condition at the farm level, which could serve to cushion the impact of the financial crisis. Tighter credit,
however, becomes a serious concern for agricultural production. The report uses farmers' investments in fertilizer as an
example, saying farmers currently are being asked to make commitments for their 2009 fertilizer needs and to pay a
substantial portion to that commitment, sometimes 100 percent, up front. The credit function of these transactions is
being shifted from the fertilizer producers and retail dealers to the farmers. The report goes on to say the current
financial instability simply serves to exacerbate the already volatile input/output price situation. October feeder-cattle
futures were limit down on Monday, as markets reacted to the on-again, off-again government bailout plan. October
live-cattle futures also dropped from $100 to $98 on Monday. By the end of trading Tuesday, October feeder cattle had
recovered somewhat to close at S104, and live cattle gained about a dollar back. Choice boxed-beef prices averaged
$155.40 per hundredweight on Tuesday, down about $4 from a week earlier. Corn prices, meanwhile, have fallen below
$5 on positive stocks and progress reports from USDA. The markets likely will be on edge today, as Congress reconvenes
to address a revised bailout proposal. Deep disagreements remain over what the government's role should be in the
current crisis, but a bi-partisan agreement to take action toward stabilizing credit markets should improve market
psychology and consumer confidence. Source-John Maday, managing editor-Drovers Alert, September 25, 2008,
Volume 10, Issue 40.
BQA PROGRAM RELEASES TRAIN THE TRAINER MANUAL
After months of hard work, the Beef Quality Assurance team which is partially funded by the Beef Checkoff, has
completed a 150-page "Train the Trainer" manual, a comprehensive compilation that gives a formal program definition
of BQA and is meant to standardize BQA practices across the United States. This project was led by BQA advisory
board member Dee Griffin, DVM, University of Nebraska, who says, "Cattle producers do their part to ensure product
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







safety each and every day, multiple times a day. That belief is followed throughout the production chain to the final
product that our consumers can be confident in purchasing. And when the integrity of our industry is attacked or
questioned as it was a few months back, this manual enables us to have a collective response that shows our dedication to
providing consumers with a safe, wholesome beef product." The manual, which has been endorsed by the BQA
committee and reviewed by outside experts and technical advisors, will be sent to the 100 BQA coordinators for all 50
states. These coordinators will use it to train their trainers, who will then be given a copy of the manual so as to be
prepared to answer questions in the field. "This collection of BQA best management practices combines the expertise of
our state beef council staff, veterinarians, nutritionists, university extension specialists, feedlot owners and so many
more throughout the industry," Griffin says. "Checkoff dollars have allowed us to put the manual together for many
different uses, and it gives BQA coordinators one voice while out in the field with producers something that's now
imperative to our industry." The manual was produced to standardize BQA practices in an effort to raise consumer
confidence through offering proper management techniques and a commitment to quality within every segment of the
beef industry. Producers continue to embrace BQA because it is the right thing to do for the industry, Griffin concludes,
but also because they gain through increased profitability. As an educational program, BQA strives to maximize
consumer confidence in beef by focusing producers' attention to management practices that affect the safety and quality
of beef. Source-Drovers Alert, September 25, 2008, Volume 10, Issue 40. For further information about BQA visit:
http://bqa.org
GROUPS PROTEST "LOOP HOLE" IN COOL
The NFU was joined by R-CALF USA and the U.S. Cattlemen's Association in a letter to USDA Secretary Schafer
requesting that the USDA immediately remedy what they're calling a "loophole" in the agency's interim final rule for
COOL that would allow beef packers to label U.S. beef products under the "multiple countries" category. The provision
would allow packers to label exclusively U.S. products under a label that also includes other countries of origin. Doing so
would eliminate the need to segregate carcasses from different countries of origin at the processing level. The National
Farmers Union released a statement on Sept. 17, announcing their disappointment in this possibility; however, the
COOL rule is set to take effect Sept. 30 and industry observers say it is doubtful USDA will make any changes prior to
that time. Source-Drovers Alert, September 25, 2008, Volume 10, Issue 39.
THE CHESS GAME OF MANDATORY COOL
Well, mandatory country-of-origin labeling (COOL) is now the law of the land, or is it? The outrage was palpable when
it became obvious that beef packers had no intention of bearing all the cost of mandatory COOL and just intended to
take advantage of the multiple countries of origin label, and place it on all products. Then came the announcement that
the label could only be used if there was product from other countries processed on that day. Of course, it is all about the
letter of the law, so one could soon imagine a pen of Canadian or Mexican feeder calves at every packing plant to make
sure that one gets processed every shift. The stakes are high. Either the industry accepts the fact that mandatory COOL
is going to apply to an even smaller percentage of the product than anticipated, or the law is going to have be reopened
and reworked once again. Everyone knew the original law was a terrible piece of legislation. The original legislation will
cost the industry billions, which we can't afford; and the revised version, is going to allow packers to skirt the intent of
the law. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, October 3, 2008.
MANDATORY COOL & THE CHECKOFF MARRY UP
Outrage over the distorting of the intentions of the mandatory country-of-origin (COOL) law supposedly led Sen. Jon
Tester (D-MT) to introduce a bill that would modify the beef-checkoff program. Called the "Beef Checkoff
Modernization Act of 2008," the biggest proposed change is it would require at least 30% of checkoff revenues be spent
on promoting U.S. beef. This theoretically would be a way to pull U.S.-labeled product into the system and rectify the
problems being experienced with mandatory COOL. Of course, the problem with mandatory COOL has always been
that it was a red herring; it was just a chess piece in the game between those who felt the changes occurring in the
industry represented opportunity and needed to be dealt with proactively, and those who felt these changes represented
significant risk and had to be fought. It was about globalization, value-based marketing and a host of other factors
simmering between these two segments for quite some time. So it's not surprising that the checkoff battle has been
resurrected with Tester's legislation, which also includes the call for a producer referendum every seven years, and to
put in place a battle for checkoff dollars between the competing interests. Perhaps this is the time when the industry
needs to take a step back and put an end to this conflict. Without question, both sides have valid points. The checkoff
program has already taken steps to increase access to bidding for checkoff dollars and there's probably more that can
be done. The checkoff is governed by cattlemen, and opinion polls indicate its success in improving beef demand is well
understood and supported by the majority of cattlemen. Thus, spending millions of dollars every seven years to validate
this is simply a waste of funds. It's not hard to trace back the feud, or the common links with Montana and Tester, the
Livestock Marketing Association and R-CALF. Mistakes have been made, powerful individuals have been offended. But
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







this industry can no longer afford this feud. We have challenges, we have opportunities, and we must resolve these
personal and industry differences. Certainly there won't always be agreement, but there is value in having a democratic
process, and immense value in speaking with one voice; the stakes simply are too high to continue this internal vendetta.
Perhaps we've all been victims of this vendetta in one form or another, but mandatory COOL and this Tester's proposal
illustrate that it's vital the industry create its own solutions and not leave it to politicians who don't understand the
dynamics involved. It's time to stop this vicious cycle. It's time for cattlemen to let it be known that the industry comes
first, and we're not going to tolerate any more of these games. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, October 3, 2008.
IS CHUTE-SIDE DNA TESTING IN THE OFFING?
It's possible. Researchers at the University of Virginia are working on a handheld device for use in human medicine that
may eventually allow doctors, crime-scene investigators, pharmacists and others to quickly conduct DNA tests from
almost anywhere. James Landers, University of Virginia professor of chemistry and mechanical engineering and
associate professor of pathology, and his colleagues are developing a handheld device the size of a microscope slide that
houses many of the analytical tools of an entire laboratory, in extreme miniature. "This area of research has matured
enough during the last five years to allow us to seriously consider future possibilities for devices that would allow sample
in-answer out capabilities from almost anywhere," he says. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, October 3, 2008.
WHAT IS JATROPHA
Jatropha is the genus name for a number of plants which occur in the family Euphorbeaceae. In Florida, there are
several different species of Jatropha which are commonly grown in gardens, or as ornamental plants. Many of these
Jatropha species produce very colorful flowers and are huge butterfly and bee attractants. The species Jatropha curcas
has been identified as having the potential to produce relatively large amounts of oil for biodiesel. Biodiesel is the
alternative to petrol diesel which is used to power diesel engines. Jatropha curcas should form part of the biodiesel
solution to the world's energy crisis. There is no BEST crop, just the most appropriate species for the region in which
the crop will be grown. We believe that Florida's subtropical condition gives us a competitive edge (over most US States)
in the production of this high yielding oil crop. Oil Palm produces more oil per acre than Jatropha. However, oil palm is
susceptible to frost conditions and may not yield well in many parts of Florida. The oil palm belt (suitable growing
conditions) is located at 4 degrees north and 8 degrees south (of latitude). The Jatropha belt extends to 30 degrees north
and 35 degrees south. This includes a lot of South Florida. Jatropha curcas is the species you will need. This is simply
because it is the highest oil yielding species in the genus, capable of over 400 gallons per acre (650 trees per acre). Like
any other plant, Jatropha curcas does well under 'Best' conditions of soil, water and spacing. Ideally, a pH range of 6 to
6.8 suits the plants well, as well as adequate irrigation and fertilization. Jatropha however, will survive under harsh
conditions but your yields will obviously be lower in this case. Source-Lee County Extension Website, Fitzroy B.
Beckford (Roy), Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent, University of Florida, IFAS Lee County Extension.
JATROPHA CURACAS INFORMATIONAL MEETING SCHEDULED FOR HARDEE
COUNTY
An informational meeting has been scheduled for 10:30-11:15 Bryan Beer, II LaBelle Grove
November 13, 2008 at the Hardee County Commission Management
Chambers in Wauchula. The meeting will begin at 9:00 Hear from a citrus farmer who is
AM and end at approximately 11:30 AM. The location growing Jatropha. A case study of a
may possibly change to the Hardee Agri-Civic Center if pioneering Jatropha farmer!
numbers planning to attend grow larger than the Board 11:15-Noon Questions and Answers/Comments
Chamber can handle. I am told that if this occurs, from:
notification will be posted at the Board Chamber of the Roy Beckford
move to the Agri-Civic Center. Bryan Beer, II
9:00-9:15 Welcome and Introductions Lockie Bill Lambert Director, Hardee
Gary, Hardee County Extension Director County Economic Development Office
9:15-10:15 Roy Beckford Lee County Extension, Dr. Steve Futch Multi-county Citrus
University of Florida/IFAS: "So You Agent UF/IFAS
Wanna Grow Jatropha?" A one-hour Dr. John Arthington Director, Range
presentation on Ihoun' Iiarn. ed n:i h 1 FC
to apply them.
10:15-10:30 Break




The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







DESOTO COUNTY CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION ANNUAL FALL MEETING
Let's have the biggest turnout ever!! The 2008 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Annual Meeting will be held at
7:00 p.m., Thursday, October 30, 2008 at the Turner Center Exhibit Hall. All members, along with their family, are
invited to attend. Members are asked to bring a covered dish. You may bring one guest to the steak dinner. Members
bringing more than one guest will be asked to pay $10.00 per each additional guest. Not only will you be able to enjoy an
excellent steak dinner by attending, you will also hear excellent information concerning beef cattle production and most
of all, you will have a great time socializing with your friends. I look forward to seeing you at this year's annual meeting
of the Cattlemen's Association.
HOW COULD WALL STREET IMPACT THE FARM GATE?
You would have to be a recluse not to be aware of the huge financial challenges awaiting the U.S. in the next few months.
While everyone has been discussing the impact of Wall Street on Main Street, let's go beyond that to the farm gate.
First, many of you deal with community banks, the Farm Credit System, FSA and other financial institutions. Is your
money safe and will they continue to loan money? Many of the lenders involved in this crisis were shadow bankers, who
are apart from the mainstream regulated lenders that must play by the rules. However, some banks have invested in
financial instruments or made loans in areas facing a major correction of asset values. These institutions may face
challenges. Expect more paperwork and documentation to be required. Government unfortunately will attempt to step
up oversight on all institutions, possibly under one regulation. Many of these oversight agencies may not have an
understanding of agriculture and rural areas. Producers must make their lender better by providing the financial
statements and detail necessary to tell the story to the oversight agencies. Credit will become more scrutinized and
possibly much more conservative you had better know your five Cs of credit. Liquidity, cash and financial sensitivity
testing will be very important in developing salable financial packages. For producers in the grain enterprise who
experienced red-hot markets and strong profits, watch for 2009 and 2010 margin compression because of increasing
input costs. Another barometer to measure upcoming economic health will be the economic health of the Asian
economies. Growth must be near 10% to maintain strong food and fuel demand. The final word is that Wall Street will
ripple to the far corners of the globe and to farm and rural communities. A proactive plan is your best remedy, but that
may not stave off some economic damage. Source-Corn and Soybean Digest, September 30, 2008.
CONSUMER TRUST KEY FOR ANIMAL AGRICULTURE
Animal agriculture may be at the tipping point that could send it from social license to social control, according to
Charlie Arnot, president of CMA Consulting, a Kansas City, Mo.-based consulting firm that manages the Center for
Food Integrity. Producing food for the vast majority not involved in food production is a noble pursuit, he says. But if
we do not retain and broaden consumer trust in what we do, we will lose that social license and will be faced with
increasing regulation and scrutiny, he cautions. The recent videos of animal abuse may be a watershed moment.
Primarily because for the first time, animal welfare has been connected with food safety via these visuals, Arnot
explains. That is complicated by the fact that agriculture generally operates in a science-based culture. However,
science is no longer enough to communicate with consumers. "We need to be able to talk about value judgements we
must be able to 'own' the ethical obligation we have to our animals and their care," he notes. Consumers sense a change
in the way their food is raised, but do not understand modern agriculture. "It is up to us to communicate that our
commitment to doing what's right has never been stronger," says Arnot. "Until we do this, we'll never earn consumer
trust." It goes back to the adage, they don't care how much you know until they know how much you care. "We've
improved safety, efficiency and traceability, but not consumer trust," he adds. "We need to stop talking about how we
used to be. Let's talk about who we are today in a way that builds consumer trust and confidence." Source-Drovers
Alert, October 9, 2008, Volume 10, Issue 42.
TOUGH TIMES-TOUGH DECISIONS
As fall approaches, we have seen a slide in cattle prices, fuel prices are declining but are still high and fertilizer remains
very high. The ability to grow winter forage such as ryegrass does not appear to be economical for this winter and
spring. Estimates are as high as $700-800 per acre to produce ryegrass (lack of rainfall would push the number to the
high-end). Every in-put has shown increases in cost as we head to the winter. There are several things I would
encourage you to do. First, do not cut cost with mineral. Keep the mineral in front of them. Second, I would encourage
you to observe your cow herd for productivity and eliminate any brood cows with low productivity, bad eyes, teeth, and
udders. For cows on good bahiagrass pasture (1 % acre per cow), have available 1200-1500 pounds of supplemental hay
and 700-800 pounds of 16% molasses (equivalent of 450# of Supplemental TDN). The amount of hay required would be
less, if the hay is of a higher quality. Jim Selph me "1
James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
"No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden". Thomas Jefferson
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






SUF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA

I IFAS Extension


Pasture Weed Field Day 2008
Wednesday, October 15
8:30 AM
$50 On-site registration
We will need to know how many people we will be serving for lunch. Please contact Toni Wood at (863) 735-1314 or
email her at flstroll@ufl.edu. The registration fee, should be made payable to The South Florida Beef Forage Program
and may be sent directly to Toni Wood, 3401 Experiment Station, Ona, FL 33865. As long as you are preregistered, you
may bring your payment with you to the field day. If you are not pre-registered, on-site registration is $50.


HARD TO CONTROL WEEDS
Are you battling soft rush or blackberry? How do you
remove sedges (watergrass) from forages while ensuring
forage safety? What herbicides are available for pasture
weed control? Is that weed poisonous? How can we
fertilize economically? How good is Mulato as a forage?
These are all questions we ask.
Every year we are challenged with new questions,
problems, and sometimes, new weeds. It is our goal to
help you find an economical approach to weed control
in your pastures.
Controlling weeds can be a problem, and optimum
weed control will depend on the particular weed species,
the environment, weed age and size, as well as time of
year. We hope to share some information concerning
pasture weed control at this field day.
WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
Ranchers
Herbicide Applicators
Extension Educators
Anyone who wants to learn more
about weed control in pastures
PROGRAM
8:30 Arrive at Ona (See Map)
9:00 Opening Welcome & Address
9:10 Tour
Soft rush (bull rush) control
Blackberry update
Sedge (watergrass) control
Cogongrass
Fertility
Forage Update
12:00 Lunch at Range Cattle REC


1:30 Weed Garden Tour
CEU CREDITS
We are currently applying for CEU. Those needing
such credits will be asked to sign in when arriving at the
pasture and sign out at the end of the program.
TOUR SPEAKERS
Dr. Brent Sellers, Extension Weed Specialist and Asst.
Professor, University of Florida-IFAS Range Cattle
REC and Dept. of Agronomy
Dr. Greg MacDonald, Weed Scientist and Assoc.
Professor, University of Florida-IFAS Department of
Agronomy
Dr. Jason Ferrell, Weed Scientist and Asst. Professor,
University of Florida-IFAS Department of Agronomy
Dr. Maria Silveira, Soil and Water Scientist and Asst.
Professor, University of Florida-IFAS Range Cattle
REC and Dept. of Soil and Water Science
Dr. Joao (Joe) Vendramini, Agronomist and Asst.
Professor, University of Florida- IFAS Range Cattle
REC and Dept. of Agronomy
DIRECTIONS
From SR64: Travel South on CR663 approximately 5
miles and turn right onto Goosepond road. Travel
approximately 1.5 miles and turn left onto Experiment
Station Road. Follow the signs for parking. From
SR70: Travel North on CR661 approximately 10 miles
and turn left onto Goosepond road. Travel
approximately 1.5 miles and turn left onto Experiment
Station Road. Follow the signs for parking.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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