Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: September 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00040
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION


DeSoto County
Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
September 2008 / Volume 30 Number 9S Oa W
UF/IFAS Ona Weed Field
CALENDAR OF EVENTS Day-2007
September
18-19 Wildlife Field Days: Longino Ranch, Quail Creek Plantation

26 FCA Replacement Heifer Sales, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyards

October
2 DeSoto/Charlotte Farm Bureau Annual Meeting, DeSoto Middle School Cafeteria, 6:30 PM
3 Mo Brangus & Express Ranches/Hines Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 12:00 Noon, Arcadia Stockyards

3-4 FCA Ranch Rodeo Finals and Cowboy Heritage Festival, Silver Spurs Rodeo Arena, Kissimmee
15 UF/IFAS Ona Range Cattle Research Center 2008 Weed Field Day
21-23 Reproductive Management School, Arcadia, FL
30 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Fall Meeting, Turner Center Exhibit Hall, 7:00 PM

31 1st Annual All Purpose Heifer Sale, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyard

PROPOSED DOWNER RULE IS ALL ABOUT PUBLIC RELATIONS
USDA announced a proposed rule this week to completely ban the slaughter of cattle that become non-ambulatory, even
after the initial inspection by the Food Safety Inspection Service. These animals would be condemned and disposed of.
The number of cattle affected by this new rule is miniscule .003% of cattle slaughtered. So this isn't a rule designed so
much to bolster food safety; nor is it expected to have much impact on producers' bottom lines. The aim of this rule is to
maintain consumer confidence in beef. All the negative publicity created by the Humane Society of the U.S. over the
downer cow issue has made it clear to producers that while the issue is a minor one, it can have a big consumer effect.
Every segment of the industry has been solidly behind this new rule, because it's in their own economic best interests to
send the proper message relative to humane handling of animals. It is, however, one of those precedents that has to be
concerning for the industry. This new rule has no basis in science; it's a public relations move. Ultimately, the industry
must respond to consumer wishes. But, at some point, the industry is going to have to trust itself to actually respond to
these desires or we will continue to see the government becoming more and more involved with the marketing of our
product. Source-Troy Marshall, Cow-Calf Weekly, Friday, August 29, 2008.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


I







MARKET INFORMATION
September 2, 2008


09/01/08
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 98.81
Live Heifer 98.96
Dressed Steer 155.65
Dressed Heifer 155.75
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnrenorts/Im ct150.txt


BEEF PRODUCTION
Slaughter
Live Weights
Dressed Weights
Beef Production (M. of Pounds)


08/30/08
(Estimate)
677,000
1281
782
528.1


htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


08/17/08


Last Week Last Year


98.66
98.79
155.70
155.78


94.33
94.50
148.41
148.66


Last Week
(Estimate)
673,000
1279
780
523.3


Last Year
(Actual)
705,000
1282
785
552.1


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.37% 2.32%
Choice 55.16% 55.10%
Select 34.88% 35.11%
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


2.12%
52.62%
35.75%


URA N.0.I1 N LMXBR 45



'0 -S


* R 4? ~ -A 4 f I


Choice/Select Spread
09/05/08
$6.25/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M XB403.TXT


Arcadia Stockyards Medium & Large and 2 BulLtsteers & Helfers Arcadia Stockyard Feeder Sleers & Buls Medium & Large I & 2
September 3, 20M September 3. 2008
180





':: i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i I T 11 l
10D $10 000





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State Volume Steers Heifers
Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
TX 13,200 $111.24 $104.71 $108.49 $104.72 $102.30 $105.54
AL 9,400 $106-114 $102-107 $96-100 $94-103 $90-97 $86-93
TN 6,200 $95.81 $91.01 $87.46 $95.81 $90.01 $87.46
FL 7,600 $94-104 $91-100 $90-93 $87-108 $83-92 $86-90
GA 9,500 $90-108 $90-104.50 $86-99 $85-100 $81-95 $78-88
KY 13,700 $107.55 $106.46 $107.17 $96.79 $98.77 $101.27
OK 12,200 $114.91 $114.70 $113.66 $106.63 $107.96 $107.40
MO 15,900 $123.12 $117.58 $117.30 $110.51 $108.35 $106.18

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 25 to 26 cents higher from 6.02-6.19 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 20 cents lower at 5.60 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 25 to 26 cents lower from
5.53-5.56 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 27% cents lower from 5.20-5.60 per bushel. Toledo US No 2
rail Yellow corn was 21% cents lower from 5.41-5.50 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 27% cents
lower at 5.22 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday August 29, 2008
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







GRAIN CROPS-PLANTING AND GROWTH STATUS
Corn 97% of the crop has reached the silking stage Barley 42% has been harvested
Soybeans 94% has reached bloom Sorghum 75% of the acreage is heading
Winter wheat 95% has been harvested Oats 74% has been harvested
Spring wheat 35% has been harvested
States with the worst pasture conditions-at least 40% of the acreage rated poor or worse-include: California (100%);
Colorado (48%); North Carolina (43%); North Dakota (48%); Oregon (54%); South Carolina (46%) and Texas (50%).
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2008HTTP://DESOTO.IFAS.UFL.EDU/
YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
2008 1.87" 1.51" 2.52" 3.33" 2.55" 7.09" 6.79" 8.42" __ ___34.01"
2007 1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 0.05" 0.78" 32.79"
2006 0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
2005 __ ___ _9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES (2 METERS) AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
HIGH 82.30 84.90 86.10 88.10 94.60 94.90 94.90 95.20 I I I I I NA
LOW 28.50 35.60 39.30 41.60 51.90 65.00 50.40 70.80 1NA
Rainfall for 2008 is currently 8.10 inches ahead of 2007

AMERICAN MEAT INSTITUTE PETITIONS FSIS ABOUT IRRADIATION LABELING
USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service has scheduled a public meeting about what action it should take regarding a
petition from the American Meat Institute that asks FSIS to recognize the use of low-penetration and low-dose electron
beam irradiation on the surface of chilled beef carcasses as a processing aid. Doing so would eliminate the need to label
the irradiation process in the ingredients label. Source-Drovers Alert, August 27, 2008 I Volume 10, Issue 35.
K-STATE RESEARCHERS EXAMINE LINK BETWEEN E. COLIAND DISTILLERS'
GRAINS
The USDA has awarded Kansas State University a National Research Initiative in Food Safety grant totaling nearly $1
million to study the connection between feeding distillers' grains and E. coli 0157:H7 in cattle. Due to the rapid growth
in U.S. ethanol production, feedyards increasingly use distillers' grains, an ethanol co-product, in their rations. Results
of some previous research, however, suggest a possible relationship between feeding distillers' grains and higher levels of
the pathogen. Source-Drovers Alert, August 27, 2008 I Volume 10, Issue 35.
FARMS MUST BE LARGE TO SUPPORT MOST FARM FAMILIES
High input costs and volatility in commodity prices causing fluctuations in farm income have forced changes on farm
families, according to a report from University of Minnesota ag business management educator Gary Hachfeld. Some
have taken off-farm jobs and shifted to part-time farming, but for many full-time farm families, survival has meant
expanding. Source--Drovers Alert. August 27. 2008 I Volume 10. Issue 35.

Beef Management Calendar

September/October

Last date to plant Sorghum-Sudan Grass Check dustbags, oilers, etc.

Check mineral feeder. Use at least 8% phosphorus in Check pastures and hay fields for grubs, mole crickets,
mineral and not over 2 'V to 1 calcium to phosphorus. Ispittlebugs and armyworms.

Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already done. Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
Stimulant.

Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat. Pregnancy check cows.

Control weeds in summer pastures. Plant warm season perennial pastures.

Make plans to attend the FCA Convention.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







TWO ANIMAL-RIGHTS INITIATIVES ON NOVEMBER BALLOT
Animal-rights supporters have targeted two states on opposite sides of the country for animal-welfare ballot initiatives
this year. In Massachusetts, voters will decide on a statewide ban on greyhound racing by 2010. The initiative could close
two greyhound tracks in the state. In California, voters will decide on Proposition 2, a ballot initiative sponsored by a
coalition of animal-protection groups requiring that egg-laying hens, veal calves and pregnant sows have room enough
to lie down, stand, turn around and fully extend their limbs, effective 2015. The initiative, Standards for Confining Farm
Animals, is backed by the California VMA. Some CVMA members have formed the Association of California
Veterinarians largely because they disagree with their association's support for Proposition 2. This week, the American
Veterinary Medical Association issued a statement indicating the organization is concerned about the California ballot
initiative. "Although the AVMA applauds every effort to promote animal welfare, the Association is concerned about
possible, unintended negative consequences to animal welfare of enacting the measure." The AVMA statement said the
organization "believes Proposition 2, 'Standards for Confining Farm Animals,' is admirable in its goal to improve the
welfare of production farm animals; however, it ignores critical aspects of animal welfare that ultimately would threaten
the well-being of the very animals it strives to protect. "The best housing environments take into consideration all
relevant factors, including: freedom of movement; expression of normal behaviors; protection from disease, injury and
predators; adequate food and water; and proper handling. Proposition 2 would clearly provide greater freedom of
movement but would likely compromise several of the other factors necessary to ensure the overall welfare of the
animals, especially with regard to protection from disease and injury." Selection of California and Massachusetts for
animal-welfare initiatives was not random. Clearly they were identified as states where voters would likely support such
measures. In California, the United Egg Producers held a rally this summer in hopes of swaying public opinion on the
issue. The group estimates that up to $50 million will be needed to successfully fight the issue. Source-Drovers Alert,
August 27, 2008 I Volume 10, Issue 35.
THIESSE'S THOUGHTS: USDA CROP REPORT
The USDA Crop Report issued on August 12 came in with a larger-than-expected crop production estimate for the 2008
corn crop in the U.S., which would make it the second largest U.S. corn crop in history, trailing only the 2007 total corn
production of 13.1 billion bushels in the U.S. Based on Aug. 1 conditions, USDA is estimating the 2008 corn crop at
almost 12.3 billion bushels, which is an increase of about 570,000 bushels from the July 1 estimated production of just
over 11.7 billion bushels. The August estimate is slightly higher than the just-under 12 billion bushels that most private
analysts estimated. The USDA soybean report on August 12 was slightly below grain trade estimates, and slightly lower
than the USDA estimate on July 1. USDA now projects the 2008 U.S. soybean crop at 2.973 billion bushels, which
compares to 3 billion bushels estimated by USDA on July 1. Source---Kent Thiesse Corn & Soybean Report, Crop News
Weekly, August 27, 2008 I Volume 8, Issue 35.
NCBA STATEMENT ON INDUSTRY-WIDE AFFIDAVIT FOR "COOL"
The National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) is pleased to join an industry-wide coalition in announcing the
development of a standardized affidavit to declare country of origin for livestock throughout the marketing chain.
Tomorrow, NCBA and other representatives from throughout the livestock and meat industries will meet with United
States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Under Secretary Bruce Knight to present this affidavit. Our goal was to
create a simple, efficient, and effective means of declaring livestock origin from conception to consumer, and we believe
this affidavit does exactly that. Producers can fill in information specific to their cattle and assert the origin of any
animal being sold. Livestock marketers further along the ownership chain can use individual affidavits to create a
single, combined affidavit for a group of animals. Representatives from every point in the supply chain unanimously
agreed to use this standardized affidavit, which will greatly ease the burden that a mandatory COOL places on
producers. NCBA has focused on implementing COOL in a manner that provides maximum benefit and minimal
disruption to our ranchers. We believe this affidavit will be a significant help in that effort. Additionally, NCBA is
working with our industry partners on the issue of so-called 'gap cattle,' which are animals traded in the period between
July 15, 2008 (the date that declared all livestock present in the U.S. as being of U.S. origin) and the September 30, 2008
implementation deadline. We are well aware that owners of these animals would be very hard pressed to recreate the
paper trail documenting origin. The industry consensus is that current owners should be considered to have first-hand
knowledge of those cattle. Therefore, these animals should be allowed to move through the marketing chain using the
standard affidavit. NCBA will continue to work on behalf of our cattlemen to put in place an effective and accurate
labeling system. Additionally, we will be leading the effort to educate producers on how to comply with the new rule.
See page 6 of this newsletter for the affidavit. Source: NCBA News Release. zA- ./

James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
"No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden". Thomas Jefferson







IFAS Extension


I UNIVERSITY of
Ur FLORIDA
IFAS Extension
South Florida Beef/Forage Program
Fall Wildlife Field Day Tours
2:00 6:00 PM
Meal Included
September 18, 2008--Longino Ranch, Sarasota
September 19, 2008--Quail Creek Plantation, Okeechobee


2:00 PM Registration each Day

2:30 PM Tour of each Site

5:30 PM Meal


Tour One: Longino Ranch is located approximately 15 miles West of Arcadia off of State Highway 72.
This tour site will be a follow up to last years Quail/Dove Shortcourse and we will tour the same
approximate route to highlight changes to the habitat that have occurred since last year. Highlights to
this tour will include areas that were burned and chopped last year as well as food plots and native plant
ID for wildlife. Focus of wildlife at this Ranch is Quail, Turkey and Deer.

Tour Two: Quail Creek Plantation is located on Hwy. 68E/Orange Avenue, Okeechobee, 5 miles east of 441.
This tour site will look at the hunting operations of this plantation with a focus on their quail release program, the
habitat at the plantation and native plant ID. The plantation utilizes burning and chopping in their habitat management
program. Focus of wildlife at this Ranch is Quail, Turkey, Deer and Pheasant.
Cost for each tour is $15.00 or $20.00 if attending both Field Day Tours. An evening meal will be
included in the registration cost for the Tour(s). P-e-Rcgistrations arc due by Septembr- 5, 2008. After
that date the cost to register is $20.00 per tour. Make checks payable to: The South Florida Beef-Forage
Program, c/o Christa L. Carlson-Kirby, 1303 17th St W., Palmetto, FL 34221.

Pre-RegI s t d StnS t Spe b 1 30I8.


Registration Form
Name Today's Date:
Address Tour One:
City
Zip Code Tour Two:
Phone
Email
Total included: $ SofutionsforYourLife








NCBA
Recommended Country of Origin Affidavit/Declaration Statements


Continuous Country of Origin Affidavit/Declaration: (This following affidavit could be used by any
operation in the livestock chain attesting to the Country of Origin of livestock but particularly for first-level
producers.)

As an affidavit is deemed by USDA as an official record of Country of Origin, I attest through first-hand
knowledge, normal business records, or producer affidavit(s) that all livestock referenced by this
document or other communications specific to the transaction and transferred are of
origin. Should the origin of my livestock become other than that described
above, I agree to notify the buyer/agent when this occurs.

This affidavit/declaration shall remain in effect until revoked in writing by the undersigned and is
delivered to (agent/buyer).


Signature Date Business/Farm/Ranch Names/Location



Origin Declaration Language for Seller/Buyer Invoices and Other Sales Documents with a Continuous
Declaration on Record or as a Stand-Alone Declaration of Origin: (The following statement would be
used as a supporting declaration of origin specific to transactions involving livestock from persons with a
continuous affidavit on file, or as a stand alone affidavit/declaration on specific transactions) on invoices,
check-in sheets and other sales documents.)

I attest that all livestock referenced by this document and transferred are of
origin.


Signature Date


Appended Declaration Statement for Immediate/Direct Supplier Transactions to Packers: (Some packers
may request that their immediate/direct suppliers add the following language to the continuous or sales record
affidavit/declaration statements to affirm the period of time in which Country of Origin records would be
maintained by their immediate suppliers. This may be necessary as packers are required by law to maintain
Country of Origin records for one-year and they must be able to obtain records from their immediate suppliers
within that one-year period to substantiate country of origin claims).

I attest that (Insert business name) has, and will maintain records of
livestock origin for one year from the date of delivery of the livestock to the packer/buyer.

I attest that these records reflecting specific transactions are available for inspection for the sole purpose
of compliance with an audit as described by the country-of-origin labeling provisions contained in the
Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 as amended. (P.L. 108-767, USCA section 1638a, 2003).
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.










Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services MAIL OR FAX COMPLETED FORM TO:
Division of Animal Industry Bureau of Animal Disease Control
Division ofAnimal Industry Cattle
Bureau of Animal Disease Control Programs Office
Room 327, 407 S. Calhoun St.
APPLICATION FOR NAIS PREMISES REGISTRATION Tallahassee, FL 32399-0800
850/410-0900; Fax 850/410-0957


Section 585.145, F. S.,
CHARLES H. BRONSON 5C-3, 5C-4, 5C-5, 5C-6, 5C-7, 5C-9, 5C-20, and 5C-21 F. A. C.
COMMISSIONER
NOTE: All documents and attachments submitted with this request are subject to public review pursuant to Chapter 119, F.S.

Business/Farm/Ranch/Stable Account Information

Business/Premises Name
Primary Contact
Mailing Address
City ST Zip
Business Phone FAX
Mobile Phone Pager
E-mail Address
On-site Contact
(If ... above; Manager, Agent, Stable Manager, etc.)


Premises Information (Where animals are located or the Florida Management Headquarters)


Physical (911) Address
City ST Zip
County


Primary Business Function (please check only one)

OProduction Unit (Farm, Ranch, OClinic (Location where animals OMarket/Collection Point (Backgrounder, Order Buyer, USDA
Flock, Equine Facility) are treated for disease) Approved Market, Approved Dealer)
O Exhibition (Fairs, Shows) O Quarantine Facility E Laboratory E Port of Entry
O Slaughter Plant H Tagging Site H Rendering H Non-producer Participant


Species on Premises (please check all that apply, excluding wildlife)


Bovine =>
Avian =>
OAquaculture


O Beef H Dairy H Bison
O Chickens O Ducks O Geese H Guineas O Pheasants O Quail H Ratites O Turkeys
H Camelid O Deer H Goats O Horses O Rabbits O Sheep H Swine H


Signature of Applicant or Authorized Agent


Date


DACS-09215 Rev. 07/08

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







SUPPLEMENTAL AGRICULTURE DISASTER PROGRAMS
Under the new Supplemental Agriculture Disaster Programs included in the 2008 Farm Bill, producers must have crop
insurance or non-insured crop disaster assistance (NAP) coverage for the land for which assistance is being requested,
and for all farms in all counties in which they have an interest, including grazing lands in order to be eligible to
participate in the disaster programs. Since the 2008 Act was enacted after the application periods had closed for those
programs, producers who did not have such coverage could not comply with this requirement in order to be eligible for
the new disaster programs. However, the 2008 Act authorizes a waiver that allows producers to pay a fee, called a "buy-
in" fee, to be eligible for this new disaster assistance.
The buy-in fee for 2008 eligibility only for either the catastrophic risk protection insurance (CAT) or NAP is $100 per
crop, but not more than $300 per producer per administrative county, or $900 total per producer for all counties less
any previously paid fees for CAT and/or NAP. Producers can contact their local administrative FSA County Office to
file the application for waiver and pay the applicable fees.
The buy-in fee is due no later than Sept. 16, 2008, 90 days after the date of enactment, as required by the 2008 Act.
Those who miss this opportunity will not be eligible for disaster assistance. Producers are also reminded that the
payment of the applicable buy-in fee does not afford the producer crop insurance or NAP coverage; it only affords
eligibility for the 2008 disaster programs.
The following programs are included in the Supplemental Agriculture Disaster Program in the Farm Bill:
Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments (SURE) Program
Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP)
Tree Assistance Program (TAP)
Emergency Assistance Livestock, Honeybees and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP)
Note: While the Livestock Indemnity Program is part of the Supplemental Agriculture Disaster Program, it is exempt
from the CAT/NAP purchase requirement.
Fact Sheet on the 2008 Crop Year Buy-in for Disaster Assistance Programs.
http ://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA File/buvinwaiver08.pdf
An additional note: In order for our producers to be eligible for this program, we will have to ask for a USDA
Secretarial Disaster Declaration in addition to the Presidential Disaster Declaration that is requested during
storms/hurricanes. We work closely with FSA during these times so please feel free to send any loss estimates and data
that become available as the storm exits the state to my email (palmerlFidoacs.state.fl.us) or Nelson Mongiovi at
mongion(idoacs.state.fl.us.
21' ANNUAL REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL
The next Reproductive Management School will be held here in Arcadia on October 21-23, 2008. The cost for this
year's school is $350.00. The purpose of the course is to strengthen managerial capabilities of owners and operators of
beef cattle ranches. This is an intense course in reproductive management of the cow herd. Although the topic of
pregnancy diagnosis is given extensive treatment in the program, participants should not expect this training to make
them proficient in that skill.
Tuesday Oct 21. 2008 Wednesday Oct. 22. 2008 4:30 Body Conditions Scoring
Problem
8:00 Introductions-Jim Selph 8:00 Genetic Management for Thursday, Oct. 23 2008
8:30 Pregnancy Testing- Efficient Reproduction
10:00 Break 8:30 Coping with Calving Problems 8:00 The Role of Artificial
10:10 Quiet Handling of Beef Cattle 9:15 Breeding Season Management Insemination in Beef Cattle -
11:00 Pregnancy Testing Video 9:45 Break 8:30 Herd Bull Selection
11:30 Lunch (provided) 10:00 Health Management- 9:00 Estrus Synchronization and
12:15 Intact Tracts Lab Dr. Al Vaccination Program for Heat Detection
Warnick, Professor Emeritus, Reproduction 9:30 Break
Animal Science Dept., 10:30 Nutrition for Reproduction 9:45 Nutrition for Reproduction -
UF/IFAS Economics of Supplementation Forage Quality
1:00 Lab-Hands on Pregnancy 11:15 Reproductive Implications of 10:15 The Role of Ultrasound in a
Testing Body Condition and Beef Cattle Herd
3:30 Heifer Development and Nutritional Management 10:45 Program Summary and
Management of Young Cows- 12:00 Lunch (provided) Evaluation-Staff
4:15 Bull Breeding Soundness 12:30 Laboratory: Hands on 11:00 Hands-on Laboratory End of
Evaluation Pregnancy Testing-Staff Reproductive Management
5:30 Bull Breeding Soundness 3:30 Utilizing Performance Records School
Evaluation-Live Animal Demo
A $ 100.00 Deposit (non-refundable) is Due: October 3, 2008 if you plan on participating in this year's Reproductive
Management School with the remainder due on the first day of the school. For more information (registration forms,
etc.), please contact me at the Extension Office: 863-993-4846.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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