Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00039
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: August 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION


DeSoto County
Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
Au ust 2008 / Volume 30 Number 8
CALENDAR OF EVENTS Fall Armyworm
August
23 Grazing Management 101-Okeechobee, FL

September
4-5 Advanced Grazing Management School, LaBelle, FL
9-10 Florida Cattlemen's Association Fall Quarterly, Sebring, FL
17-19 Wildlife Field Days: Longino Ranch, Quail Creek Plantation
26 FCA Replacement Heifer Sales, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyards

October
2 DeSoto/Charlotte Farm Bureau Annual Meeting, DeSoto Middle School Cafeteria, 6:30 PM
3 Mo Brangus & Express Ranches/Hines Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 12:00 Noon, Arcadia Stockyards
3-4 FCA Ranch Rodeo Finals and Cowboy Heritage Festival, Silver Spurs Rodeo Arena, Kissimmee
15 UF/IFAS Ona Range Cattle Research Center 2008 Weed Field Day
21-23 Reproductive Management School, Arcadia, FL
30 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Fall Meeting, Turner Center Exhibit Hall, 7:00 PM
31 1st Annual All Purpose Heifer Sale, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyard

RESEARCHER DISPUTES CLAIMS OF ORGANIC FOOD BENEFITS
Proponents of organic foods often claim they are nutritionally superior, and a recent research report from the Organic
Trade Association supports those claims. However, Joseph D. Rosen, PhD, emeritus professor of food toxicology at
Rutgers University and a scientific advisor to the American Council on Science and Health, evaluated the research and
released his findings this week. His report, titled "Claims of Organic Food's Nutritional Superiority: A Critical Review,"
concludes that researchers used selective data and failed to prove any nutritional benefits for organic foods. Source-
Food Systems Insider e-version, Friday, July 25, 2008, Vol. 8, Issue 14.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


I







MARKET INFORMATION
July 28, 2008


07/26/08
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 94.88
Live Heifer 94.68
Dressed Steer 151.61
Dressed Heifer 151.31
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnrenorts/Im ctl50.txt


BEEF PRODUCTION
Slaughter
Live Weights
Dressed Weights
Beef Production (M. of Pounds)


06/26/08
(Estimate)
668,000
1271
777
517.6


htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


07/12/08


Last Week Last Year


97.21
97.25
154.26
154.32


90.63
90.80
141.39
141.66


Last Week
(Estimate)
686,000
1268
775
530.1


Last Year
(Actual)
669,000
1273
783
521.9


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.44% 2.51%
Choice 56.80% 57.32%
Select 33.48% 32.95%
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


2.04%
53.74%
37.23%


UIOA NalA Nwi L LMXB 4
Chol 1'mclipnd


,/ .; ,// ./ / l/ 4/ / ,'


Choice/Select Spread
07/25/08
$6.37/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M XB403.TXT


Arcadia Slockyards Medium A Large 1 and 2 Bullsi/Sers & Helles Arcadla Stockyard Feeder Stees & Bull Medium & Large 1 & 2
July23. 208 July 23, 200B

15 0
2 0 1N 0D


40 SAO 00

leAe4b P0t m 0t BuilOl 1: $ ,O0
Welghts

The summary below reflects the week ending July 25, 2008 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, July 292008.
State I Volume Steers Heifers
Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
TX 19,200 $106.12 $112.60 $110.12 $100.49 $99.90 $104.92
AL 9,000 $100-109 $98-106 $96-101 $92-102 $89-96 $84-91
TN 7,600 $103.18 $100.73 $97.90 $95.61 $91.68 $87.60
FL 6,200 $89-102 $85-97 $81-90 $81-96 $80-90 $80-87
GA 7,300 $83-110 $86-104 $84-104 $76-101 $82-97.50 $79-80
KY 16,800 $111.52 $105.05 $99.30 $101.03 $96.01 $99.62
OK 24,600 $122.46 $114.51 $112.92 $108.23 $106.92 $106.42
MO 16,200 $117.06 $113.88 $ 114.32 $105.32 $106.10 $104.89

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 60 to 65 cents lower from 5.74-5.95 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 58 cents lower from 5.43-5.44 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 51 to 53 cents lower
from 5.24-5.30 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 42 to 59 cents lower from 5.21 /2-5.53 z per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 59 3/4 cents lower from 5.19 /2-5.29 / per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow
Corn rail was 57 cents lower at 4.96 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday
July 25, 2008 http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







GRAIN CROPS-PLANTING AND GROWTH STATUS
Corn 34% of the crop has reached the silking stage Barley 93% is at or beyond the heading stage
Soybeans 45% has reached bloom Sorghum 33% of the acreage is heading
Winter wheat 71% has been harvested Oats 98% of the crop has headed
Spring wheat 95% has headed
States with the worst pasture conditions-at least 30% of the acreage rated poor or worse-include: Arizona (47%);
California (100%); Colorado (52%); North Carolina (42%); South Carolina (56%); and Texas (48%).
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2008HTTP://DESOTO.IFAS.UFL.EDU/
YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
2008 1.87" 1.51" 2.52" 3.33" 2.55" 7.09" 6.08" __ ___18.87"
2007 1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 0.05" 0.78" 32.79"
2006 0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
2005 ____ __9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES (2 METERS) AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
HIGH 82.30 84.90 86.10 88.10 94.60 94.90 94.90 I I I I NA
LOW 28.50 35.60 39.30 41.60 51.90 65.00 50.40 NA
Rainfall for 2008 is currently 3.92 inches ahead of 2007
Note: During July our FAWN Tower was relocated due to the construction of the new EOC for DeSoto County. There
was a loss of data for some items we record. It is our understanding though that rainfall amounts were not recorded
from 11:00 AM on July 28, 2008 until 1:00 PM on July 29, 2008. I would estimate that we had about 1.25 inches here
during that time. Also, I believe there was a problem with the low temperature.
$202.5 MILLION ADDED FOR CONSERVATION PROGRAMS
An additional $200 million will be made available through the 2008 farm bill to help farmers and ranchers nationwide to
solve natural resource problems through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, according to Agriculture
Secretary Ed Schafer. An additional $2.5 million will be available for Agricultural Management Assistance in 16 states.
"These additional funds will assist farmers and ranchers in solving critical natural resource problems," Schafer said.
"Voluntary incentive-based programs like EQIP and AMA are the key to helping producers meet their conservation
goals and provide the public with important benefits such as cleaner water, improved air quality, healthy soils, and
abundant wildlife." Source-Crop News Weekly. Corn & Soybean Digest. July 23. 2008 I Volume 8. Issue 30.

Beef Management Calendar

August/September

Control Smutgrass with Velpar if there is adequate soil Check dustbags, oilers, etc.
moisture. I

Treat for liver flukes as close to August 15th as possible. Check pastures and hay fields for armyworms.

Check mineral feeder. IRevaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.

Wean calves and cull Cow Herd. Pregnancy check cows.

If cattle grubs were found on cattle last winter or heel flies Determine bull replacement needs, develop selection
were observed in the pasture, treat for cattle grubs in criteria, & start checking availability of quality animals.
August. 1
Heavily graze pastures to be inter-planted to cool season Pregnancy test and cull open heifers from replacement
pastures. herd.
SURVEY OUTLINES FOOD-SHOPPING TRENDS
In spite of rising food costs and supermarket promotions, about 84 percent of U.S. consumers said they did not use their
economic stimulus checks for groceries. The survey was sponsored by Precima, a retail analytics firm, and involved
almost 2,000 consumers. Eighty-two percent of survey respondents indicated they have cooked at home more in the past
six months instead of spending at a restaurant. Source-Food Systems Insider, Friday, July 25, 2008, Vol. 8, Issue 14.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







CATTLE ON FEED REPORT SHOWS SLIDING NUMBERS
USDA's latest Cattle On Feed (COF) report was called neutral to bearish as the marketing number came in significantly
lower than estimates. Nationwide, the COF number was at 96% of a year ago, placements were 91% and marketing at
92%. The seven-state COF number mimicked the national trends, as the numbers for on-feed, placements and
marketing came in at 96%, 90% and 88%, respectively. Placements were down 47% in Colorado, 18% in Texas, 22%
in Nebraska, and 20% in Kansas. The demise of the Canadian feeding industry continues, as Canada registered its
lowest COF number since 2004.
CATTLE INVENTORY NUMBERS DOWN AGAIN. As expected, the semi-annual inventory report released last week
showed a continued but small reduction of the U.S. beef cattle herd. USDA estimates the number of beef cows and
heifers that have calves at 33.15 million head on July 1 down from 33.35 million head in 2007; a drop of about 0.6%,
but a smaller decline than most pre-report estimates suggested. Similarly, USDA estimates a 2.2% decline in beef
replacement heifers, which is on the high side of pre-report figures, as well. All cattle and calves in the U.S. (as of July 1)
totaled 104.3 million head, slightly below the 104.8 million on July 1, 2007 and down 1% from the 105.2 million two
years ago. All cows and heifers that have calved, at 42.4 million, was down slightly from both July 1, 2007 and July 1,
2006. Beef cows, at 33.2 million, were down 1% from July 1, 2007, and 1% below two years ago. Milk cows, at 9.25
million, were up 1% from July 1, 2007 and 1% above two years ago. Source-Cow Calf Weekly, Friday, August 1, 2008.
USDA TAKES ACTION ON MANDATORY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING
WASHINGTON, July 29, 2008 -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture today issued an interim final rule for the
mandatory country of origin labeling (COOL) program that will become effective on Sept. 30, 2008. The rule covers
muscle cuts and ground beef (including veal), lamb, chicken, goat, and pork; perishable agricultural commodities (fresh
and frozen fruits and vegetables); macadamia nuts; pecans; ginseng; and peanuts -- as required by the 2002 and 2008
Farm Bills. USDA implemented the COOL program for fish and shellfish covered commodities in October 2004.
Commodities covered under COOL must be labeled at retail to indicate their country of origin. However, they are
excluded from mandatory COOL if they are an ingredient in a processed food item.
USDA has also revised the definition of a processed food item so that items derived from a covered commodity that has
undergone a physical or chemical change (e.g., cooking, curing, smoking) or that has been combined with other covered
commodities or other substantive food components (e.g., chocolate, breading, tomato sauce) are excluded from COOL
labeling.
Food service establishments, such as restaurants, lunchrooms, cafeterias, food stands, bars, lounges, and similar
enterprises are exempt from the mandatory country of origin labeling requirements.
The rule outlines the requirements for labeling covered commodities. It reduces the recordkeeping retention
requirements for suppliers and centrally-located retail records to one year and removes the requirement to maintain
records at the retail store. The law provides for penalties for both suppliers and retailers found in violation of the law of
up to $1,000 per violation.
The rule will become effective on Sept. 30, 2008. To allow time for covered commodities that are already in the chain of
commerce -- and for which no origin information is known or been provided -- to clear the system, the requirements of
this rule will not apply to covered commodities produced or packaged before Sept. 30, 2008.
The rule prescribes specific criteria that must be met for a covered commodity to bear a "United States country of
origin" declaration. In addition, the rule also contains provisions for labeling covered commodities of foreign origin,
meat products from multiple origins, ground meat products, as well as commingled covered commodities. Source-
USDA.
NEW BEEF CUTS BOOST EXPORTS TO JAPAN
The U.S. Meat Export Federation, with support from USDA, Nebraska Beef Council, Nebraska Corn Board, Nebraska
Department of Agriculture, University of Nebraska and Colorado State University, has developed 17 unique new beef
cuts to appeal specifically to Japanese consumers. The group credits these products with helping increase export
volumes of U.S. beef to Japan in April 2008 by 93 percent over those from one year earlier. Source-Cow Calf Weekly,
Friday, August 1, 2008.
MISCANTHUS: BIOFUELS WITH LESS LAND THAN CORN
In the largest field trial of its kind in the United States, researchers have determined that the giant perennial grass
Miscanthus x giganteus out performs current biofuels sources by a lot. Using Miscanthus as a feedstock for ethanol
production in the U.S. could significantly reduce the acreage dedicated to biofuels while meeting government biofuels
production goals, the researchers report. The new findings, from researchers at the University of Illinois, appear this
month in the journal Global Change Biology. Source-Crop News Weekly, Friday, August 6, 2008. 6- 6i/
James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
"No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden". Thomas Jefferson






UNIVERSITY of UNIVERSITY of

Okeechobee County
IFAS Extension Extension Office IFAS Extension
Extension Office
Okeechobee, FL

This course is sponsored by The South Florida Beef-Forage Program of the University of Florida, Cooperative Extension
Service. This course represents basic Pasture Management principles and concepts. It is part of a continuing multi-County
education effort to help South-Central Florida producers raise and market high quality beef cattle, per cow, per acre,
profitably.
Grazing management is the manipulation of livestock grazing to obtain defined outputs of livestock products. It involves
careful management of both pasture and livestock resources to meet desired objectives. This course is offered in a two
session format to offer basic pasture management principles along with hands-on activities and demonstrations. The
theories of grazing management concepts and pasture establishment methods are discussed in a classroom setting during
the first half of the day, and concepts taught are supported by practical applications in the field during the afternoon
session.
This is the second offering of "Grazing Management 101" and we encourage new farmers to attend. Registration fee for
this school is $ 20.00 if returned by August 8, 2008, and $ 30.00 if returned after August 8, 2008 or at the door.
Registration forms can be obtained by contacting Jim Selph at 863-993-4846. Registrations should be returned to, and
checks made payable to: South Florida Beef-Forage Program, c/o Christa L. Carlson-Kirby, 1303 17th St W.,
Palmetto, FL 34221.

Agenda
8:00am Registration 10:15am Pasture Establishment
8:30am Introduction Lockie Gary
Pat Hogue 11:15am Pasture Management
8:45am Soils and Fertilization Dr. Joe Vendramini
Christa Carlson-Kirby 12:00pm Lunch
9:30am Morning Break 12:45pm Afternoon Tour
:45an Forage Species 4:00pin CoIclusioni


only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






U F UNIVERSITY of

IFAS Extension
South Florida Beef/Forage Program
Fall Wildlife Field Day Tours
2:00 6:00 PM
Meal Included
September 17, 2008-Frazier Ranch, Polk City
September 18, 2008--Longino Ranch, Sarasota
September 19, 2008--Quail Creek Plantation, Okeechobee


2:00 PM Registration each Day

2:30 PM Tour of each Site

5:30 PM Meal


Tour One: Longino Ranch is located approximately 15 West of Arcadia off of State Highway 72. This
tour site will be a follow up to last years Quail/Dove Shortcourse and we will tour the same approximate
route to highlight changes to the habitat that have occurred since last year. Highlights to this tour will
include areas that were burned and chopped last year as well as food plots and native plant ID for
wildlife. Focus of wildlife at this Ranch is Quail, Turkey and Deer.

Tour Two: Quail Creek Plantation is located on Hwy. 68E/Orange Avenue, Okeechobee, 5 miles east of 441.
This tour site will look at the hunting operations of this plantation with a focus on their quail release program, the
habitat at the plantation and native plant ID. The plantation utilizes burning and chopping in their habitat management
program. Focus of wildlife at this Ranch is Quail, Turkey and Pheasant.

Cost for each tour is $15.00 or $20.00 if attending bothTours. An evening meal will be included in the
registration cost for the Tour(s). Registrations are due by September 5, 2008. After that date the cost to
register is $20.00 per tour. Make checks payable to: The South Florida Beef-Forage Program, c/o
Christa L. Carlson-Kirby, 1303 17th St W., Palmetto, FL 34221.

Registration Form
Name Today's Date:
Address Tour One:
City
Zip Code Tour Two:
Phone
Email
Total included: $ Solutionsfor Your Life





The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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